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Links to info about Hawaiʻi's two most active volcanoes:

Kīlauea: Daily eruption updates, maps and photos/videos.

Mauna Loa: Weekly updates and current monitoring data.

  

HVO installs a new webcam to track lava flow

HVO scientists recently installed HPcam, a new webcam to help track lava flow activity on Kīlauea Volcano's south flank. During daytime hours (left), it might be difficult to discern active lava from the landscape, but smoke from burning vegetation and fume from the lava tube are often telltale signs of the flow's location.  At night, the webcam switches to a more sensitive low-light mode to better see the active flow. In this mode, hot lava appears as bright white. For example, white streaks in the upper left part of the image captured on July 10 (right), are lava channels streaming down the pali (cliff). The line of small white dots to the right of the pali indicates active lava on the coastal plain.
HVO scientists recently installed HPcam, a new webcam to help track lava flow activity on Kīlauea Volcano's south flank. During daytime hours (left), it might be difficult to discern active lava from the landscape, but smoke from burning vegetation and fume from the lava tube are often telltale signs of the flow's location. At night, the webcam switches to a more sensitive low-light mode to better see the active flow. In this mode, hot lava appears as bright white. For example, white streaks in the upper left part of the image captured on July 10 (right), are lava channels streaming down the pali (cliff). The line of small white dots to the right of the pali indicates active lava on the coastal plain. Click on image to enlarge.



 

More Volcano Information from HVO and Beyond

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Volcano WatchCurrent issue of Volcano Watch essay, written weekly by USGS scientists.
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Last modification: 19 July 2016 (pnf)