HVO Kilauea Status

Recent Kilauea Status Reports, Updates, and Information Releases

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Friday, July 31, 2015 8:48 AM HST (Friday, July 31, 2015 18:48 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Inflationary tilt continued at Kīlauea's summit over the past day, and was accompanied by a modest increase in lava lake level. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Data from Kīlauea's summit tiltmeters showed that inflationary tilt continued during the past day. The lava lake displayed a corresponding steady rise within the vent as well. Seismicity continues at background levels. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,600 to 5,500 metric tons/day for the week ending July 28.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 500 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 23, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam and satellite views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest and burning vegetation along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Phot

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Thursday, July 30, 2015 10:08 AM HST (Thursday, July 30, 2015 20:08 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Inflationary tilt characteristic of a Deflation/Inflation event was observed at Kīlauea's summit over the past day, and was accompanied by a modest increase in lava lake level. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Data from Kīlauea's summit tiltmeters showed inflationary tilt over the past day, consistent with the inflation phase of a Deflation/Inflation (DI) event. The lava lake displayed a steady rise within the vent, consistent with inflationary tilt, along with intermittent spattering periods. Seismicity continues at background levels. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,900 to 6,100 metric tons/day for the week ending July 21.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. A tiny lava flow emerged from a vent on the east crater floor yesterday at 15:30 and again at 18:20, at the same location as was posted yesterday. This flow, confined to Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater, was brief in duration and coverage. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 400 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 17, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam and satellite views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest and burning vegetation along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Phot

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 9:29 AM HST (Wednesday, July 29, 2015 19:29 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: No substantial tilt was observed at Kīlauea's summit over the past day, and only minor changes in lava lake level occurred. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Data from Kīlauea's summit tiltmeters remained essentially unchanged over the past day, reflecting only minor fluctuations. The lava lake level showed minor fluctuations as well, owing to spattering. Seismicity continues at background levels. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,900 to 6,100 metric tons/day for the week ending July 21.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. A tiny lava flow emerged from a vent on the east crater floor at around 02:00 am, but, confined to Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater, stopped 45 minutes later. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 400 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 17, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam and satellite views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest and burning vegetation along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Note about sulfur dioxide emission rate: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207
(Explains how HVO's method of measuring SO2 changed in 2014 and the effects of that change on reported estimates of emission rates.)

MORE INFORMATION

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawaii (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 8:55 AM HST (Tuesday, July 28, 2015 18:55 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Deflation continued at Kīlauea's summit over much of the past day, with minor changes in lava lake level. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Deflation continued at Kīlauea's summit over much of the past day, with summit tilt flattening out this morning. The lava lake level had minor fluctuations due to spattering, and a small collapse occurred within the crater this morning which briefly agitated the lava lake. Seismicity continues at a low background level, with several small earthquakes beneath the summit, East Rift Zone and Southwest Rift Zone, and scattered across the volcano's south flank. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,900 to 6,100 metric tons/day for the week ending July 21.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 400 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 17, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam and satellite views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Note about sulfur dioxide emission rate: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207
(Explains how HVO's method of measuring SO2 changed in 2014 and the effects of that change on reported estimates of emission rates.)

MORE INFORMATION

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawaii (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Monday, July 27, 2015 8:48 AM HST (Monday, July 27, 2015 18:48 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Deflation began yesterday at Kīlauea's summit, and the lava lake level dropped slightly. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Deflation began yesterday at Kīlauea's summit and continues this morning, and the lava lake level dropped slightly over the past day. Spattering was also common in the lake over the past day, with brief fluctuations in lava level. Seismicity continues at a low background level, with several small earthquakes beneath the summit and Southwest Rift Zone, and scattered across the volcano's south flank. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,900 to 6,100 metric tons/day for the week ending July 21.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 400 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 17, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Note about sulfur dioxide emission rate: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207
(Explains how HVO's method of measuring SO2 changed in 2014 and the effects of that change on reported estimates of emission rates.)

MORE INFORMATION

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawaii (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Sunday, July 26, 2015 8:49 AM HST (Sunday, July 26, 2015 18:49 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Inflation continued at Kīlauea's summit, and the lava lake level rose slightly. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Inflation continued at Kīlauea's summit, as part of a DI event, and the lava lake level rose slightly over the past day. Seismicity continues at a low background level, with several small earthquakes beneath the summit and Southwest Rift Zone, and scattered across the volcano's south flank. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,900 to 6,100 metric tons/day for the week ending July 21.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 400 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 17, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Note about sulfur dioxide emission rate: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207
(Explains how HVO's method of measuring SO2 changed in 2014 and the effects of that change on reported estimates of emission rates.)

MORE INFORMATION

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawaii (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Saturday, July 25, 2015 8:53 AM HST (Saturday, July 25, 2015 18:53 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). All times are Hawai`i Standard Time.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Inflation continued at Kīlauea's summit, and the lava lake level rose slightly. The East Rift Zone lava flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but has not advanced significantly and poses no threat to nearby communities. Low levels of seismic activity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: Inflation continued at Kīlauea's summit, as part of a DI event, and the lava lake level rose slightly over the past day. Seismicity continues at a low background level, with several small earthquakes beneath the summit and scattered across the volcano's south flank. Summit sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from 2,900 to 6,100 metric tons/day for the week ending July 21.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no obvious change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which hosts several incandescent, outgassing crater vents. Low levels of background seismicity continue. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 400 tonnes/day when measurements were last possible on July 17, 2015.

'June 27th Lava Flow' Observations: Webcam views show continued activity on the flow field. Active breakouts were scattered across a broad area extending from about 4 to 8 km (2.55 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The most distant breakouts are evident by the smoke plumes produced where they are creeping into the forest along the edge of the flow field.



Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Note about sulfur dioxide emission rate: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207
(Explains how HVO's method of measuring SO2 changed in 2014 and the effects of that change on reported estimates of emission rates.)

MORE INFORMATION

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawaii (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



Update Archive

Older updates can be found using the HVO Alert Archive Search.

New Update Format

For more information about the Volcano Alert Level and Aviation Color Code, please see the U.S. Geological Survey's Alert Notification System for Volcanic Activity Fact Sheet (pdf) or the USGS Volcanic Activity Alert-Notification System web page.