HVO Kilauea Status

Recent Kilauea Status Reports, Updates, and Information Releases

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Saturday, May 28, 2016 9:16 AM HST (Saturday, May 28, 2016 19:16 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō are still active. At the summit, inflationary tilt has resumed and the lava lake level has risen slightly. As of yesterday, scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. None of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flows currently pose a threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: Inflationary tilt began midday yesterday and continues this morning. Based on web cam imagery, the lava lake level has risen slightly from yesterday's measurement of 39.5 m (130 ft) below the floor of Halema’uma’u crater. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continue. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 7,000 t/d during the past week. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which began on May 24, are still active. As of yesterday, one lobe extended about 1.2 km (4,100 ft) to the northwest and the other about 1.2 km (4,100 ft) to the southeast. Webcam views of both breakouts overnight show continued surface activity feeding these flows. For recent photographs and maps of these two new active flows, see web links below. Very slow deflationary tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō continued over the past day. Persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater continues. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 460 metric tons/day when last measured on May 24.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: In addition to the new lava flows on the flanks of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field continues, with small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. Recent satellite images and aerial observations indicate that the active breakouts are within about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Friday, May 27, 2016 9:44 AM HST (Friday, May 27, 2016 19:44 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō are still active but have not advanced significantly overnight. At the summit, deflationary tilt continues and the lava lake level has changed little. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. None of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flows currently pose a threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: Deflationary tilt continued at the summit over the past day. This morning the lava lake level was measured at 39.5 m (130 ft) below the floor of Halema’uma’u crater. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continue. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 7,000 t/d during the past week. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which began on May 24, are still active but have not advanced significantly over the past day. One lobe extends about 1.2 km (4,100 ft) to the northwest and another extends about 1.2 km (4,100 ft) to the southeast. Webcam views of both breakouts overnight show continued surface activity feeding these flows. Neither lava flow has extended beyond the existing Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field. For recent photographs and maps of these two new active flows, see web links below. Deflationary tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō continued over the past day. Persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater continues; slight subsidence of the crater floor was observed overnight. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 460 metric tons/day when last measured on May 24.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: In addition to the new lava flows on the flanks of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field continues, with small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. Recent satellite images indicate that the active breakouts are within about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Thursday, May 26, 2016 10:03 AM HST (Thursday, May 26, 2016 20:03 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō are still active but have not advanced significantly. At the summit, deflationary tilt continues and the lava lake has dropped slightly. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. None of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flows currently pose a threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: Deflationary tilt continued at the summit over the past day. The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater has dropped, and the lava lake level was measured at 39 m (130 ft) below the floor of Halema’uma’u crater this morning. A rockfall within the Overlook crater at 12:11 am this morning impacted the lake and triggered sloshing and agitation of the lake briefly. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continued. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 7,000 t/d during the past week. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō which began on May 24 are still active but have not advanced significantly over the past day. An HVO overflight yesterday morning (May 25) showed that the northern breakout was feeding a new channelized lobe that was about 950 m (0.6 miles) long. Webcam views overnight showed that this vent fed several small lava channels but the flow does not appear to have advanced significantly in the past day. The eastern breakout, in the area of the 2011 "Peace Day" flow, was feeding short flows near the vent yesterday morning, with the flow front stalled. Webcam views of this breakout overnight show continued activity around the vent. Neither lava flow has extended beyond the existing Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field. Deflationary tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō continued over the past day. Persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater continues. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 460 metric tons/day when last measured on May 24.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: In addition to the new lava flows on the flanks of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field continues, with small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. Recent satellite images indicate that the active breakouts are within about 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 10:41 AM HST (Wednesday, May 25, 2016 20:41 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō are still active but have not advanced significantly. At the summit, the most recent deflation-inflation event began shortly before midnight, and deflationary tilt continues this morning. The summit lava lake level has dropped since yesterday in concert with the tilt. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. None of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flows currently pose a threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater remained active, and the lava lake level was measured at 30 m (100 ft) below the floor of Halema’uma’u crater this morning. Summit tilt began to drop slightly by mid-day yesterday, and the onset of the most recent deflation-inflation (DI) event began before midnight with marked deflationary tilt. As expected, the lava lake level is dropping in concert with the deflationary tilt. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continued. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 7,000 t/d during the past week. These values are typical for active pond conditions. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: The two new lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō are still active but have not advanced significantly. An HVO overflight at 8:30 a.m., HST, this morning, showed that the flow originating from the northeast flank of the cone, at the site of the June 27th lava flow, consists of a channelized flow that has made a new 950 m (0.6 mi) long lobe flowing toward the northwest. The original branch, which was flowing in a more west-northwest direction, was stalling. The other flow, east of the cone in the area of the 2011 "Peace Day" flow, is still active but has not advanced significantly. Neither lava flow had extended beyond the existing Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field at the time of this morning’s overflight. Deflationary tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō continued through yesterday, but little net change in tilt has been recorded since early this morning. Persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater continues. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 460 metric tons/day when last measured on May 24.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: In addition to the new lava flows on the flanks of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field continues, with small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. The most distant breakouts were about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, May 24, 2016 11:16 AM HST (Tuesday, May 24, 2016 21:16 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. At around 6:50 a.m. a lava flow broke out from the northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone; a second flow also broke out on the east flank of the cone. At the summit, inflationary tilt continued through much of yesterday; however, little change in tilt has occurred overnight. The summit lava lake level has risen slightly since yesterday, and spattering has been intermittently visible from the Jaggar overlook this morning. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. None of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flows currently pose a threat to nearby communities. A small flurry of deep earthquakes has occurred on the lower part of the southwest rift zone of Kīlauea over the past several days. Earthquakes in this area of the rift zone are observed intermittently, and do not represent unusual behavior for Kīlauea.

Summit Observations: The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater remained active, with the lava lake level measured at around 23 m (75 ft) below the Halema`uma`u crater floor this morning, high enough to view intermittent spattering from the Jaggar overlook. Inflationary tilt continued through much of yesterday, however little change in tilt has occurred since around 9 p.m. last night. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continued. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 7,000 t/d during the past week. These values are typical for active pond conditions. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: At around 6:50 a.m., in concert with sharp deflationary tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, two lava flows broke out from the flanks of the cone. One is on the northeast flank, approximately 250 m (0.15 mi) from the rim of the cone, heading toward the northwest. The other flow is on the east flank of the cone, approximately 500 m (0.3 mi) from the rim of the cone, heading toward the southeast. At around 8:30 a.m., during an HVO overflight, the flow on the northeast flank was roughly 1 km (0.6 mi) long, and the flow on the east flank was around 700 m (0.4 mi) long, but neither has extended beyond the existing flow field. Typical of new breakouts, the initial flow activity has been vigorous, but neither flow is currently threatening any nearby communities. The floor of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater has subsided slightly with the new flow activity. Persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater continues. No change in seismic activity has been noted, and remains low and steady. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 300 metric tons/day when last measured on May 10.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: In addition to the new lava flows on the flanks of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field continues, with small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. The most distant breakouts were about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Monday, May 23, 2016 8:25 AM HST (Monday, May 23, 2016 18:25 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. Seismicity and deformation are within normal levels throughout the volcano. Inflationary tilt at the summit continues, and the summit lava lake level is rising in concert with the tilt. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. These flows currently pose no threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater remained active, with the lava lake level measured at 29 m (95 ft) below the Halema`uma`u crater floor yesterday afternoon. The lava level has risen several meters since that time in concert with the continuing summit inflationary tilt. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continued. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 6,400 t/d during the past week. These values are typical for active pond conditions. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Webcam images show persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater and from skylights in the lava tube on the northeast flank of the cone. Inflationary tilt at the cone continues, with a slight increase in rate around mid-day yesterday. Seismic activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō has been low and steady over the last day. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 300 metric tons/day when last measured on May 10.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: Webcam images show continued surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field in the form of small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. The most distant breakouts were about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Sunday, May 22, 2016 8:17 AM HST (Sunday, May 22, 2016 18:17 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. Seismicity and deformation are within normal levels throughout the volcano. Inflationary tilt at the summit continues, and the summit lava lake level is rising in response to the tilt. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. These flows currently pose no threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater remained active, with the lava level at about 25-30 m (80-100 ft) below the Halema`uma`u crater floor this morning. The level of the lava lake has risen over the past day, in concert with the continuing summit inflationary tilt. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continued. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 6,400 t/d during the past week. These values are typical for active pond conditions. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Webcam images show persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater and from skylights in the lava tube on the northeast flank of the cone. Inflationary tilt has been measured on the cone since around noon yesterday. Seismic activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō has been low and steady over the last day. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 300 metric tons/day when last measured on May 10.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: Webcam images show continued surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field in the form of small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. The most distant breakouts were about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Saturday, May 21, 2016 8:02 AM HST (Saturday, May 21, 2016 18:02 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. Seismicity and deformation are within normal levels throughout the volcano. Summit deflationary tilt switched to inflationary tilt yesterday evening. The current level of the lava lake at the summit has not changed significantly since yesterday. Scattered lava flow activity continued on the June 27th lava flow field within about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. These flows currently pose no threat to nearby communities.

Summit Observations: The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater remained active, with the lava level at about 35 m (115 ft) below the Halema`uma`u crater floor this morning. There have been minor fluctuations in the lava lake level over the past day, with no significant net change since yesterday. The deflationary tilt observed over the last few days switched to inflationary tilt yesterday evening, marking the most recent deflation-inflation (DI) event recorded at the summit. These events are common and represent typical behavior for the Kīlauea summit. Tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering continued. Sulfur dioxide emissions from the summit vent ranged from 4,100 to 6,400 t/d during the past week. These values are typical for active pond conditions. Data from GPS networks and interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) show continued long-term inflation of the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone magma reservoirs.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Webcam images show persistent glow from spatter cones within the crater and from skylights in the lava tube on the northeast flank of the cone. The tiltmeter on the cone measured deflationary tilt through yesterday, but little change in tilt has been recorded since early this morning. Seismic activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō has been low and steady over the last day. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents was about 300 metric tons/day when last measured on May 10.

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: Webcam images show continued surface flow activity on the June 27th flow field in the form of small breakouts scattered northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō where they have been occurring for the past several months. Mapping from last week's overflight indicates that the most distant breakouts were about 5.8 km (3.6 mi) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flows are not currently threatening any nearby communities.

MORE INFORMATION

Daily Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Subscribe to these messages: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

Webcam images: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/

Photos/Video: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia

Lava Flow Maps: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/

Definitions of terms used in update: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/definitions.pdf

Sulfur dioxide emission rate discussion: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/view.php?id=207

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻōŤ) eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/seismic/volcweb/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

Lava viewing information:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea_update/viewing.pdf
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



Update Archive

Older updates can be found using the HVO Alert Archive Search.

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For more information about the Volcano Alert Level and Aviation Color Code, please see the U.S. Geological Survey's Alert Notification System for Volcanic Activity Fact Sheet (pdf) or the USGS Volcanic Activity Alert-Notification System web page.