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Lava covered Kalapana 10 years ago

Lava moves through Harry K. Brown park, Kalapana, Hawai`i,
Harry K. Brown Park, Kalapana
May 6, 1990

Ten years ago the beloved seaside communities of Kapa`ahu and Kalapana on the southeast flank of Kilauea Volcano were overrun by lava. It was an agonizing experience for all who witnessed the retaking of homes and farmland, cherished gathering spots, and places of worship. Over an 11-month period, the slow advance of lava eventually covered about 2 km2 to an average thickness of 10 m and created a new shoreline several hundred meters seaward.

Kalapana was covered by lava from the Kupaianaha vent, which was active between July 1986 and February 1992. For first few years, lava from the vent poured through lava tubes and into the sea about 2 km west of the Kalapana area. Then a series of brief eruptive pauses in 1990 resulted in new surface flows and new tubes that delivered lava into the heart of Kalapana. Full story.

 

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