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HVO—100 years ago this December

To set the stage for our 100th anniversary in 2012, we have reflected over the past few months on events leading to the founding of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912.

As Frank Perret made his way to Italy, Thomas Jaggar made plans to relocate to Hawaiʻi in early January 1912. Meanwhile, the 1911 holiday season was made livelier by spectacular volcanic activity at Kīlauea. Lava within Halemaʻumaʻu, which had begun Frank Perret photo of Kīlauea Iki with Halemaʻumaʻu in background. to cover the crater floor in November, continued to rise and was within 35 feet of the crater rim by the end of December (right). Rumors that the Technology Station, built on the crater rim by Perret, had burned down due to the rising lava lake were rampant, but Hilo newspapers assured the public that the hut was only scorched. However, intense heat of the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake separated the heavily corroded steel cable that Perret had strung across the crater in July, causing it to fall into the lake. The floating "lava islands," which had been a constant feature during Perret's time at Kīlauea, disappeared in the rising lava lake.

"100 years ago this month" complete series (July through December)

Preview of coming events

In January 2012, HVO will conduct its 3rd annual Volcano Awareness Month and begin a year-long celebration of its 100th anniversary with activities and events described in the schedule below. Link to SCHEDULE of EVENTS--2012 Volcano Awareness Month

A fissure erupted on the east flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō early on the morning of September 21, 2011, feeding channelized ʻaʻā flow down the cone.

 
Archive of previous feature stories

  Halema`uma`u plume captures the sun in the early morning, creating a picturesque sight.
Photograph by M. Poland
November 14, 2008

Hanging with the sun and the moon

Top: Halema`uma`u plume captures the sun in the early morning, creating a picturesque sight.

Bottom: With stagnant winds present, Halema`uma`u plume stands straight up, showing off the distant, but bright, full moon.

Archive of Featured Photographs

  With stagnant winds present, Halema`uma`u plume stands straight up, showing off the distant, but bright, full moon.
Photograph by M. Poland
November 13, 2008

 

More Volcano Information from HVO and Beyond

Earthquake seismogramReport a felt earthquake to HVO using this form.
More USGS Volcano Web sites

Volcano WatchCurrent issue of Volcano Watch essay, written weekly by USGS scientists.
National Park ServiceHawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, home to HVO. Find visitor information and resources here. Graphic: Kids DoorVolcanoes for kids, from the Volcano World website.
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Last modification: 1 December 2011 (pnf)