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January 2012
HVO's 100th Anniversary
and
Volcano Awareness Month

Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., is at work in HVO's first building. Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., arrived on Kīlauea and took over the continuous study of Hawaiʻi's active volcanoes on January 17, 1912—the date often noted as the founding of HVO, America's first volcano observatory. Jaggar, shown at work in HVO's first building in 1925 (left), served as the Director of HVO until his retirement in 1940.
The events leading to Jaggar's arrival, as well as HVO's accomplishments since 1912, are recounted in —The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory—A Remarkable First 100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes,— a newly published USGS General Interest Product.
Image from June 1, 1950 Mauna Loa southwest rift zone fissure eruption
January 21, 2012 HVO Open House Schedule HVO celebrates its 100th anniversary with an Open House on Saturday, January 21. Island residents and visitors are invited to tour the observatory (not usually open to the public) and interact with HVO scientists on this special day. Scheduled activities include displays and demonstrations on Hawaiian volcanoes and HVO's work, and more.
January 2012 is Hawaiʻi Island's 3rd annual Volcano Awareness Month. HVO, in cooperation with Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, is offering numerous public programs—talks, hikes, and other events, scheduled throughout the month—to promote the importance of understanding the volcanoes on which we live and to celebrate HVO's centennial.
Image from fissure eruption


 
Archive of previous feature stories

  Halema`uma`u plume captures the sun in the early morning, creating a picturesque sight.
Photograph by M. Poland
November 14, 2008

Hanging with the sun and the moon

Top: Halema`uma`u plume captures the sun in the early morning, creating a picturesque sight.

Bottom: With stagnant winds present, Halema`uma`u plume stands straight up, showing off the distant, but bright, full moon.

Archive of Featured Photographs

  With stagnant winds present, Halema`uma`u plume stands straight up, showing off the distant, but bright, full moon.
Photograph by M. Poland
November 13, 2008

 

More Volcano Information from HVO and Beyond

Earthquake seismogramReport a felt earthquake to HVO using this form.
More USGS Volcano Web sites

Volcano WatchCurrent issue of Volcano Watch essay, written weekly by USGS scientists.
National Park ServiceHawai`i Volcanoes National Park, home to HVO. Find visitor information and resources here. Graphic: Kids DoorVolcanoes for kids, from the Volcano World website.
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URL http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/index.html
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Last modification: 15 January 2012 (pnf)