HVO Maps

Maps

July 23, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on July 7 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of July 23 is shown in red. The yellow line is the active lava tube system. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

Map with thermal mosaic overlay

This map overlays a georeferenced thermal image mosaic onto the flow field change map to show the distribution of active and recently active breakouts. The thermal images were collected during a helicopter overflight of the flow field on July 23. The June 27th flow is outlined in green to highlight the flow margin. The yellow line is the active lava tube. (see large map)

July 7, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on June 30 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of July 7 is shown in red. The yellow line is the active lava tube. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

Small-scale map of flow field

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on June 30 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of July 7 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

June 30, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on June 19 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of June 30 is shown in red. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

Map with thermal mosaic overlay

This map overlays a georeferenced thermal image mosaic onto the flow field change map to show the distribution of active and recently active breakouts. The thermal images were collected during a helicopter overflight of the flow field today (June 30). The June 27th flow is outlined in green to highlight the flow margin. The yellow line is the active lava tube. Temperature in the thermal mosaics is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas, including active breakouts. (see large map)

June 23, 2015 — Kīlauea


Landsat satellite image shows June 27th lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 by the Landsat 8 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.

The lava flow field is partly obscured by clouds, but the image shows much of the activity on the June 27th flow. Active breakouts are scattered over a wide area northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, with the farthest active lava about 7.8 km (4.8 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. (see large map)

June 19, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on June 4 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of June 19 is shown in red. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

Map with thermal mosaic overlay

This map overlays a georeferenced thermal image mosaic onto the flow field change map above and shows the distribution of active and recently active breakouts. The thermal images were collected during a helicopter overflight of the flow field today (June 19). The June 27th flow is outlined in green to highlight the flow margin. The yellow line is the active lava tube. (see large map)

June 4, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on May 21 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of June 4 is shown in red. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

Small-scale map of flow field

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on May 21 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of June 4 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

May 30, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image shows June 27th lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Saturday, May 30, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. The image is provided courtesy of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.

The image shows that scattered breakouts continue to be active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The farthest active lava in this image is 7.9 km (4.9 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. (see large map)

May 21, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on April 23 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of May 21 is shown in red. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

May 6, 2015 — Kīlauea


Landsat satellite image shows June 27th lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 by the Landsat 8 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.

The lava flow field is partly obscured by clouds, but the image shows much of the activity on the June 27th flow. There have been three areas of breakouts active on the June 27th flow recently. The Feb 21 breakout has slowly migrated north over the past couple months. The breakout north of Kahaualeʻa has been active recently at the forest boundary, triggering small brush fires. The farthest breakout is 6-8 km (4-5 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and consists of scattered activity near the forest boundary. (see large map)

April 23, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on April 9 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of April 23 is shown in red. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. (see large map)

April 20, 2015 — Kīlauea


Landsat satellite image shows June 27th flow

This satellite image was captured on Monday, April 20, 2015 by the Landsat 8 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.

The lava flow field is partly obscured by clouds, but the image shows much of the activity on the June 27th flow. There have been three areas of breakouts active on the June 27th flow recently. The breakout on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō is obscured by clouds, but the breakout north of Kahaualeʻa is visible through patchy clouds in this image. This breakout has been active recently at the forest boundary, triggering small brush fires. The farthest breakout is about 6 km (4 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and consists of scattered activity at the forest boundary. (see large map)

April 9, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on April 3 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of April 9 is shown in red. We were not able to map some parts of the flow field with breakouts today due to poor weather, and these areas are denoted in boxes. Neither area has changed significantly since our previous mapping. See the map posted on April 1 to see the entire June 27th lava flow field and location of Pāhoa. (see large map)

April 3, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on March 24 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of April 3 is shown in red. (see large map)

Map show flow field with thermal overlays

This map overlays georegistered mosaics of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the three areas of breakouts near Puʻu ʻŌʻō on April 3. The perimeter of the flow at the time the imagery was acquired is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal mosaics is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts). (see large map)

April 1, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on March 10, before shutting down near Pāhoa, is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow based on satellite imagery from April 1 is shown in red. Some recent changes north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō are not shown, as that part of the flow field was hidden from satellite view by clouds. (see large map)

March 24, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map showing flow field changes

This map shows the changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow on March 17 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of March 24 is shown in red. Small changes west of Puʻu Kahaualeʻa are not shown, as that part of the flow field was hidden by Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s gas plume at the time of mapping. (see large map)

March 17, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map of proximal flow field with thermal overlays

This map overlays georegistered mosaics of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the three areas of breakouts near Puʻu ʻŌʻō on March 17 at about 8:00 AM. The perimeter of the flow at the time the imagery was acquired is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal mosaics is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts). (see large map)

March 10, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map of distal flow field

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on February 27 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of March 10 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Map of distal flow field with thermal overlay

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on March 10 at about 10:35 AM. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe). The perimeter of the flow at the time the imagery was acquired is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Map of flow field west of Kaohe Homesteads with thermal overlay

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow west of Kaohe Homesteads on March 10 at about 10:30 AM. The perimeter of the flow at the time the imagery was acquired is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts). (see large map)

Map of proximal flow field with thermal overlays

This map overlays georegistered mosaics of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow near Puʻu ʻŌʻō on March 10 at about 10:25 AM. The perimeter of the flow at the time the imagery was acquired is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts). (see large map)

Small-scale map of flow field

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on February 27 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of March 10 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube (see large map)

March 3, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 by the Landsat 8 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds. The yellow outline is the flow margin as mapped on Friday, February 27.

The image above shows a close-up of the June 27th lava flow in the area of Kaohe Homesteads and Pāhoa. Although the leading tip of the flow has been stalled for weeks, active breakouts have persisted a short distance upslope of this stalled tip. These breakouts are largely flowing over existing portions of the June 27th flow and have not expanded the flow margins a significant amount.

Update on Friday, March 6: An overflight on the morning of Friday, March 6, showed no major changes in the June 27th flow margin compared to this March 3 map. (see large map)

February 27, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map of distal flow field

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on February 23 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 27 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Map of distal flow field with thermal overlay

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on February 27 at about 11:40 AM. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe). The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Map of flow field west of Kaohe Homesteads with thermal overlay

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow west of Kaohe Homesteads on February 27 at about 11:35 AM. The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts). (see large map)

Map of proximal flow field with thermal overlays

This map overlays georegistered mosaics of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow near Puʻu ʻŌʻō on February 27 at about 11:50 AM. The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white areas are active breakouts). (see large map)

February 23, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map of distal flow field

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on February 19 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 23 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Map of distal flow field with thermal overlay

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on February 23 at about 12:30 PM. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe). The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white shows active breakouts).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Map of proximal flow field with thermal overlay

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow near Puʻu ʻŌʻō on February 23 at about 12:00 PM. The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white shows active breakouts). (see large map)

February 19, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map of distal part of flow field

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on February 10 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 19 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Thermal overlay of distal part of flow field

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on February 19 at about 10:30 AM. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe). The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white shows active breakouts).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of flow field

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on February 10 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 19 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but is not distinguishable). (see large map)

Small-scale map of flow field

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on February 10 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 19 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

February 14, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Saturday, February 14, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. The image is provided courtesy of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds. The yellow outline is the flow margin as mapped on Tuesday, February 10.

The image above shows a close-up of the June 27th lava flow in the area of Kaohe Homesteads and Pāhoa. Although the leading tip of the flow has been stalled for several weeks, active breakouts have persisted a short distance upslope of this stalled tip. The image shows active breakouts (red pixels) roughly 400 meters (440 yards) upslope of the stalled tip, with additional breakouts scattered 2-3 km (1.2-1.9 miles) upslope. Also, several small breakouts are active in the area west of Kaohe Homesteads.

(see large map)

February 10, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on February 5 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 10 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Thermal overlay of distal part of flow field

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on February 10 at about 12:30 PM. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe). The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white shows active breakouts).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on February 5 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 10 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but has not been mapped). (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on February 5 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 10 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

February 5, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on January 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 5 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on January 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 5 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but has not been mapped). (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on January 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of February 5 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

January 29, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on January 26 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow based on today’s overflight (January 29), is shown in red. The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on January 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of January 29 is shown in red. The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but has not been mapped). (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on January 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of January 29 is shown in red. The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

January 26, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on January 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow based on satellite imagery acquired today (January 26), is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

January 22, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on January 19 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of January 22 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Thermal overlay of distal part of flow field

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on January 22 at about 9:15 AM. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe). The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white shows active breakouts).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on January 19 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of January 22 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but has not been mapped). (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on January 19 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of January 22 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

January 19, 2015 — Kīlauea


Map of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on January 13 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as determined from satellite imagery and aerial photography on January 19 is shown in red. The most distal active portion of the flow at that time was approximately 600 meters (0.4 miles) from Highway 130. Overall the activity has been sluggish and comprised of scattered breakouts and oozing pāhoehoe toes.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

January 13, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on January 9 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as determined from our overflight in the morning on January 13 is shown in red. The most distal (Makai) portion of the flow remains inactive while upslope breakouts continue. The front of the north lobe remains active. Overall the activity is sluggish and comprised of scattered breakouts and oozing Pāhoehoe toes.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow in the morning on January 9 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as determined from our overflight acquired in the morning on January 13 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but has not been mapped). (see large map)

January 9, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow in the afternoon on January 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as determined from satellite imagery acquired in the morning on January 9 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow in the afternoon on January 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as determined from satellite imagery acquired in the morning on January 9 is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the active lava tube (the tube continues downslope but has not been mapped). (see large map)

January 6, 2015 — Kīlauea


Thermal overlay of distal part of flow field

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on January 6 at about 11:30 AM. The perimeter of the flow at that time is outlined in yellow. The base image is a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe).

Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas (white shows active breakouts). During the overflight, the two most active areas were the widespread area of breakouts just upslope from the stalled flow behind the Pahoa Marketplace and the front of the flow lobe farther upslope advancing slowly to the north-northeast.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 30 at 2:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on January 6 at 11:30 AM is shown in red.

The most active parts of the flow were in an area 400 to 900 m (440 to 980 yards) behind the stalled tip of the flow above Pahoa Marketplace, and at the front of a flow lobe that branches off to the north about 3 km (2 miles) behind the stalled flow tip. Other active breakouts on the distal part of the flow were scattered between these two areas.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on December 30 at 2:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on January 6 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. Most surface activity was concentrated along the leading 3 km (2 miles) of the flow, but other breakouts were active just north of the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well pad.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the mapped extent of the active lava tube. (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on December 30 at 2:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on January 6 at 11:30 AM is shown in red.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

January 4, 2015 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Sunday, January 4, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. The image is provided courtesy of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds. The yellow outline is the flow margin as mapped on Tuesday, December 30.

The image above shows a close-up of the June 27th lava flow in the area of Kaohe Homesteads and Pāhoa. Although the leading tip of the flow has stalled recently, active breakouts have persisted a short distance upslope of this stalled tip. The image shows active breakouts (red pixels) roughly 400 meters (440 yards) upslope of the stalled tip, with additional breakouts scattered 2-3 km (1.2-1.9 miles) upslope. Also, several small breakouts are active in the area of ground cracks, near the abandoned well site.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

December 30, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 22 at 3:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 30 at 2:30 PM is shown in red.

The downslope tip of the flow was stalled about 530 m (580 yards) upslope from the Pahoa Marketplace at 19.498695 , -154.969467 (Decimal Degrees ), but weak activity was present about 50 m (55 yards) behind the front. Other small breakouts were sparsely scattered across the flow up to about 3 km (2 miles) upslope from the stalled tip (and others even farther upslope), but most of the activity was concentrated along the leading 1 km (0.6 miles) of the flow. This differs from the previous few weeks and is not an increase in activity near the flow front, but rather a decrease in activity farther upslope.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Tick marks show distance above Pahoa Marketplace. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on December 22 at 3:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 30 at 2:30 PM is shown in red.

Most surface activity was within the leading 3 km (2 miles) of the flow, but other small breakouts were scattered along the length of the flow up to the area just north of the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well pad. One other breakout, outside the map area, was active near Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the mapped extent of the active lava tube. (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on December 22 at 3:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 30 at 2:30 PM is shown in red. The lava flow remains active, but its overall level of activity appears to have declined over the past several days.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

December 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


Large scale orthophoto map

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 19 at 8:30 AM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on December 22 at 3:00 PM is shown in red. Advancement of the flow continued at a slower rate, compared to last week, and the flow moved about 265 meters (290 yards) since Friday’s mapping. A southern branch of the flow on this map, following the main steepest-descent path is stalled. The more northerly advancing branch was 30 meters (33 yards) from the fire break road and 675 meters (738 yards) away from the back of the Pāhoa Marketplace, measured in a straight line. Tick marks show distance above Pāhoa Marketplace measured along the main steepest-descent path. The blue line shows the dominant steepest-descent path for the drainage the lava flow is following, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue line on this map can be used to infer only an approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on December 19 at 8:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 22 at 3:00 PM is shown in red. A relatively narrow lobe of lava continues to advance downslope toward the Pāhoa Marketplace. The tip of the flow was about 675 meters (738 yards) from the upslope edge of the Pāhoa Marketplace, as measured along a straight line path. Several other breakouts were active farther upslope between 2 and 3 kilometers (1.2-1.9 miles) along the narrow lobe, as well as 8 kilometers (5 miles) along the north side of the crack system. The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on December 19 at 8:30 AM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on December 22 at 3:00 PM is shown in red. The leading tip of the flow had slowed, but had also widened and split into two branches. The southern branch has stalled while the northern branch continues to advance downslope toward the Pāhoa Marketplace, and the closest was about 675 meters (738 yards) away. Other breakouts were active between about 2.0-3.0 km (1.2-1.9 miles) behind the tip of the flow and about 8.0 kilometers (5 miles) along the northern side of the crack system near the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well site. The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the mapped extent of the active lava tube. (see large map)

December 19, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 18 at 11:15 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 19 at 8:30 AM is shown in red

Advancement of the flow continued at a slower rate, compared to earlier in the week, and the flow moved about 120 meters (130 yards) since yesterday’s mapping. A southern branch of the flow on this map, following the main steepest-descent path, was stalled when mapped this morning. The more northerly advancing branch was 0.9 km (0.6 miles) away from the back of the Pahoa Marketplace, measured in a straight line. Tick marks show distance above Pahoa Marketplace measured along the main steepest-descent path. The flow will probably reconnect with the steepest-descent path at around the 0.4-mile-mark, if it continues.

The blue line shows the dominant steepest-descent path for the drainage the lava flow is following, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue line on this map can be used to infer only an approximate flow paths. Flow front (see large map)

December 18, 2014 — Kīlauea


Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on December 16 at 11:15 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 18 at 11:15 AM is shown in red.

The leading tip of the flow had slowed, but had also widened and split into two branches. Both branches continue to advance downslope toward the Pahoa Marketplace, and the closest was about 1.0 km (0.6 miles) away. Other breakouts were active about 2.0 km (1.3 miles) behind the tip of the flow and within the crack system near the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well site.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The yellow line marks the mapped extent of the active lava tube. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 16 at 11:15 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 18 at 11:15 AM is shown in red

The leading tip of the flow had slowed, but had also widened and split into two branches. Both branches continue to advance downslope toward the Pahoa Marketplace, and the closest was about 1.0 km (0.6 miles) away. Tick marks have been placed along the steepest-descent path at an interval of 0.4 miles, measured from Pahoa Marketplace.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

December 16, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow early yesterday morning (December 15) is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on December 16 at 11:15 AM is shown in red.

The active tip of the flow was about 1.5 km (~0.9 miles) from the upslope edge of the Pahoa Marketplace along the path of steepest descent that the flow is currently following. The flow width varies from about 30 to 230 m (33 to 250 yd), and the current flow front is near this maximum width. Tick marks have been placed along the steepest-descent path at an interval of 0.4 miles, measured from Pahoa Marketplace.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on December 9 at 2:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 16 at 11:15 AM is shown in red.

A relatively narrow lobe of lava continues to advance downslope toward the Pahoa Marketplace. The tip of the flow was at 19.498695 , -154.969467 (Decimal Degrees ) at an elevation of 220 m (720 ft). This is about 1.5 km (0.9 miles) from the upslope edge of the Pahoa Marketplace, as measured along the path of steepest descent that the flow has been following. Several other breakouts were active farther upslope along the narrow lobe, as well as within the crack system and on the upper part of the flow field northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on December 9 at 2:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 16 at 11:15 AM is shown in red.

Most change on the flow field is due to advancement of the relatively narrow lobe of lava continues to advance downslope toward the Pahoa Marketplace. The tip of the flow at the time of mapping was about 1.5 km (0.9 miles) from the upslope edge of the Pahoa Marketplace, as measured along the path of steepest descent that the flow has been following. This particular flow branch, which started from the crack system near the True/Mid-Pacific well site on November 19 (27 days ago), is now 8.0 km (5.0 miles) long. This equates to an average advance rate of 300 m/day (330 yd/day) over that period.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

December 15, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 12, 2014, at 10:00 AM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped from satellite imagery collected early this morning is shown in red. This represents an advancement of 0.8 km (~0.5 miles) in slightly less than 3 days.

The active tip of the flow was about 1.8 km (~1.1 miles) from the upslope edge of the Pahoa Marketplace along the path of steepest descent that the flow is currently following. Tick marks have been placed along the steepest-descent path at an interval of 0.4 miles, measured from Pahoa Marketplace.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

December 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 9, 2014, at 2:30 PM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on the ground on December 12 at 10:00 AM is shown in red. This represents an advancement of 0.9 km (~0.6 miles) in slightly less than 3 days.

The active tip of the flow was about 2.6 km (~1.6 miles) from the upslope edge of the Pahoa Marketplace along the path of steepest descent that the flow is currently following. Tick marks have been placed along the steepest-descent path at an interval of 0.4 miles, measured from Pahoa Marketplace. The front of the flow was at 19.493432, -154.978043 (Decimal Degrees) at an elevation of about 250 meters (~820 ft).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

December 9, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow. The area of the flow on December 1, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 9 at 2:30 PM is shown in red.

Most surface flow activity is focused into a narrow lobe that branches off the west edge of the flow field north of the East Rift Zone crack system. The front of this finger (19.487854, -154.983492 Decimal Degrees) was 3.4 km (2.1 mi) upslope from the intersection of Highway 130 and Pahoa Village Road at the Pahoa Marketplace, at an elevation of 275 meters (900 ft).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This large-scale map shows the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on December 1, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 9 at 2:30 PM is shown in red.

Most surface flow activity is focused into a narrow lobe that branches off the west edge of the flow field north of the East Rift Zone crack system. The front of this finger (19.487854, -154.983492 Decimal Degrees) was 3.4 km (2.1 mi) upslope from the intersection of Highway 130 and Pahoa Village Road at the Pahoa Marketplace, at an elevation of 275 meters (900 ft).

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on December 1, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 9 at 2:30 PM is shown in red.

Most surface flow activity is focused into a narrow lobe that branches off the west edge of the flow field north of the East Rift Zone crack system, upslope from the intersection of Highway 130 and Pahoa Village Road at the Pahoa Marketplace. A breakout was also active on the upper part of the flow field, about 3.3 km (2.0 mi) downslope from Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

December 1, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on November 24, 2014, at 12:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 1 at 11:30 AM is shown in red.

Most surface flow activity is focused into a narrow finger that branches off the west edge of the flow field north of the East Rift Zone crack system. The front of this finger (19.475836, -154.986834 Decimal Degrees) was 4.6 km (2.9 mi) upslope from the intersection of Highway 130 and Pāhoa Village Road at the Pahoa Marketplace.

The dotted blue lines show the pertinent steepest-descent paths, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Note that about 1 km (0.6 mi) downslope from the tip of the active flow two different steepest-descent paths come very close together. This is a location where the ground becomes very flat, and the flow could end up following either (or both) of these paths.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 24, 2014, at 12:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 1 at 11:30 AM is shown in red.

Most surface flow activity is focused into a narrow finger that branches off the west edge of the flow field north of the East Rift Zone crack system. The front of this finger was 4.6 km (2.9 mi) upslope from the intersection of Highway 130 and Pāhoa Village Road at the Pahoa Marketplace.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Note that about 1 km (0.6 mi) downslope from the tip of the active flow two different steepest-descent paths come very close together. This is a location where the ground becomes very flat, and the flow could end up following either (or both) of these paths.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 24, 2014, at 12:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on December 1 at 11:30 AM is shown in red.

Most surface flow activity is focused into a narrow finger that branches off the west edge of the flow field north of the East Rift Zone crack system. The front of this finger was 4.6 km (2.9 mi) upslope from the intersection of Highway 130 and Pāhoa Village Road at the Pahoa Marketplace. Breakouts were also active in three other general locations: where the narrow finger branches from the older flow, at the eastern edge of the flow field within the crack system, and about 3.5 km (2.2 mi) downslope from Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. (see large map)

November 24, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 17, 2014, at 2:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 24 at 12:00 PM is shown in red.

This afternoon the bulk of the activity was in the region of the distal East Rift Zone crack system, near the old geothermal well site, and downslope. As lava issues from the distal crack region, pāhoehoe flows are moving downslope, parallel to, and west of, the previous Pāhoa flow.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the recently active lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 17, 2014, at 2:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 24 at 12:00 PM is shown in red.

This afternoon there were lots of breakouts in the region of the distal crack(s) SW of Kaohe and close to the old well site. Today’s activity consisted of pāhoehoe flows that are expanding the margins of the crack flows and also feeding a series of pāhoehoe lobes and breakouts that are moving downslope along the western margin of the first Pāhoa flow. Burning vegetation and smoke marks the advance of the pāhoehoe flows in the rainforest. Upslope there were a few tiny breakouts above where the tube enters the crack system.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the recently active lava tube. (see large map)

November 17, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 14, 2014, at 1:40 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 17 at 2:00 PM is shown in red.

Only one hot spot, identified by infrared camera and suggestive of at least a very recent breakout, was sighted along the front part of the flow from the East Rift Zone cracks west of Kaohe Homesteads to the stalled flow tip near Pāhoa Village Road. The lava tube feeding this part of the flow field may have been abandoned following the onset of a large breakout from the tube near Puʻu Kahaualeʻa, just downslope from Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

This afternoon, however, there were lots of breakouts between Puʻu Kahaualeʻa and the East Rift Zone crack system, the larger of which are noted on the map. A downslope progression of breakouts along the lava tube since yesterday afternoon, visible via webcam and aerial observation, suggests a gradual refilling of the tube in this area. We can only wait to see how much of the tube system within and below the crack system is reoccupied with lava.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the recently active lava tube. (see large map)

November 14, 2014 — Kīlauea


Orthophoto map

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base at 1:13,000 scale to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow as mapped on November 12 and 13, 2014, is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 14, at 1:40 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

At the time of mapping there were active breakouts on the north side of the flow field 700 meters (0.4 miles) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road.

Surface activity also continues elsewhere on the flow. Surface breakouts on the north side of the flow field range from about 230 meters (250 yards) to 2.7 kilometers (1.7 miles) mauka of Apaʻa Street. The breakout that has been the most active in the past few days is approximately 230 meters (250 yards) mauka of Apaʻa Street. Other scattered breakouts on the south side of the flow range from 230 meters (250 yards) to 1.2 kilometers (0.75 miles) along the flow margin mauka of Apaʻa Street.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 12 and 13 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 14 at 1:40 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49544, -154.95292 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 12 and 13 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 14 at 1:40 PM is shown in red. Surface activity continues along the north margin of the flow between 230 meters (250 yards) upslope of the flow tip and 2.7 kilometers (1.7 miles) mauka of Apaʻa Street. The most active flow over the past few days is approximately 230 meters (250 yards) from Apaʻa Street. Also, above where the flow enters the crack there was a small breakout 260 meters (285 yards) in length along the flow margin.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

November 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Orthophoto map

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base at 1:13,000 scale to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on November 10, 2014, at 10:45 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 12, at 7:00 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The tip of the flow is not active, but there are active breakouts on the north side of the flow field about 400 meters (437 yards) upslope. The flow tip is 155 meters (170 yards) from Pāhoa Village Road.

Surface activity also continues elsewhere on the flow. Surface breakouts on the north side of the flow field range from about 435 meters (475 yards) mauka to 440 meters (481 yards) makai of the Apaʻa Street. One of the breakouts is moving northeast and inside the fence of the Transfer Station. A breakout moved northward along Apaʻa street and eastward onto a property, destroyed a house, continued northeast and has reached 270 meters (295 yards) makai of Apaʻa Street. A breakout 760 meters (831 yards) mauka of Apaʻa Street has continued to move northeastward and has flowed to within 375 meters (410 yards) of Apaʻa Street. Other breakouts continued to flow on the north (2.4 kilometers; 1.5 miles) and on the south (1.2 kilometers; 0.75 miles) sides of the flow field.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 10 at 10:45 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 12 at 7:00 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49544, -154.95292 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 10 at 10:45 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 12 at 7:00 AM is shown in red. Surface activity occurred along the north margin of the flow between 400 meters (437 yards) upslope of the flow tip and 2.2 kilometers (1.4 miles) mauka of Apaʻa Street. A breakout has moved along Apaʻa Street, onto a property makai of Apaʻa Street and continued 270 meters (295 yards) farther northeast. Another breakout has moved within the fence of the Transfer Station. A breakout 760 meters (831 yards) mauka of Apaʻa Street has continued to move northeastward and reached 375 meters (410 yards) mauka of Apaʻa Street. Also, there were two distinct, though small, breakouts along the flow margin above the crack system.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

November 10, 2014 — Kīlauea


Orthophoto map

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base at 1:13,000 scale to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on November 7, 2014, at 3:30 PM is shown in pink, while expansion of the flow as mapped on November 10 at 10:45 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow front has not advanced during the last 24 hours. At the time of mapping, the tip of the flow was stalled 155 meters (170 yards) from Pāhoa Village Road, but there were active breakouts on the north side of the flow field 300 meters (328 yards) upslope of the flow tip.

Surface activity also continues elsewhere on the flow field. Breakouts on the north side of the flow field range from about 450 meters (492 yards) upslope to 190 meters (207 yards) downslope of Apaʻa Street / Cemetery Road. One of the breakouts is moving northeast and is about 20 meters (22 yards) from the southwest corner fence of the transfer station. A breakout moving northwest from the street has moved onto private property across the street from the transfer station, where it set an unoccupied house on fire at 11:55 AM, HST. A breakout 760 meters upslope of Apaʻa Street / Cemetery Road has sent a narrow finger of lava moving to the northeast. Other breakouts occurred on the north (2.4 kilometers; 1.5 miles) and on the south (1.2 kilometers; 0.75 miles) sides of the flow field upslope of the street.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 7, 2014, at 3:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 10 at 10:45 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49544, -154.95292 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 7, 2014, at 3:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 10 at 10:45 AM is shown in red. Surface activity was present along the north margin of the flow between 300 meters (328 yards) upslope of the flow tip and 2.2 kilometers (1.4 miles) upslope of Apaʻa Street / Cemetery Road. In the vicinity of the transfer station, a breakout has moved along Apaʻa Street and onto private property across the street from the station, setting an unoccupied home there on fire at 11:55 AM, HST. Another breakout has moved to within about 20 meters (22 yards) of the transfer station fence.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

November 7, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on November 5, 2014, at 1:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 7 at 3:30 PM is shown in red.

The June 27th flow has moved no closer to Pāhoa Village Road, but breakouts continue along the edges and interior of the flow in several places, including near the Pāhoa cemetery, the transfer station, and north of Kaohe Homesteads. There were also a few breakouts well upslope, closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The dotted blue lines show the pertinent steepest-descent paths, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

November 5, 2014 — Kīlauea


Orthophoto map

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base at 1:13,000 scale to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on November 3, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 5 at 1:00 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow has not advanced during the last 24 hours. At the time of mapping, the tip of the flow was stalled, but two days ago there was an active breakout on the north side of the flow field 130 meters (140 yards) upslope of the flow tip. As of today that flow has not moved. The tip of the flow was 155 meters (170 yards) from Pāhoa Village Road. Pāhoehoe flows did not move significantly closer to the two story structure along the southeast margin of the flow. Surface activity also continues elsewhere on the flow. A surface breakout behind the flow front about 115 meters (125 yards) makai of the Cemetery. Breakout activity, mauka of Apaʻa street, occurred along the north margin of the flow at 335 meters (366 yards), 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) and along the south margin at 1.2 kilometers (0.75 miles).

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 3, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 5 at 1:00 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49544, -154.95292 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 3, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 5, at 1:00 PM is shown in red. Surface activity occurred along the north margin of the flow 335 meters (366 yards) and 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) upslope of Apaʻa Street. In addition, there was breakout activity along the south margin at 1.2 kilometers (0.75 miles) mauka of Apaʻa Street.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

November 3, 2014 — Kīlauea


Large scale orthophoto map

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on November 1, 2014, at 11:00 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 3 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow has not advanced during the last 24 hours. At the time of mapping, the tip of the flow was stalled, but a few breakouts were active just upslope from the front.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on November 1, 2014, at 11:00 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 3 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49544, -154.95292 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube. The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on November 1, 2014, at 11:00 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 3, at 11:30 AM is shown in red. Surface activity today was scattered from the flow front to about 2.2 kilometers (1.4 miles) upslope of Apaʻa Street.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

November 1, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:5,000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 31, 2014, at 12:25 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on November 1 at 11:00 AM is shown in red. The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The dominant breakout is that northeast of the Pāhoa cemetery. This breakout reconnected with the north edge of the flow on private land farther downslope, forming a kipuka. The breakout near the transfer station was also active, but had slowed considerably. The leading edge of the flow has not advanced since Thursday, October 30, 2014, and remains at 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84).

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

October 31, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 30, 2014, at 12:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 31 at 12:25 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow has not advanced during the last 24 hours. At the time of mapping, the tip of the flow was stalled, but a few tiny oozing breakouts were active just upslope from the front. The tip of the flow was 155 meters (170 yards) from Pāhoa Village Road.

Surface activity also continues elsewhere on the flow. A new breakout occurred along the north margin of the flow downslope from Pāhoa cemetery. The breakout was moving downslope along the north margin of the flow, and was active as of 12:25 PM. Another breakout was active along the north margin of the flow just above Apaʻa Street, near the transfer station, and heading in a northwest direction.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 30, 2014, at 12:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 31 at 12:25 PM is shown in red. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 30, 2014, at 12:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 31 at 12:25 PM is shown in red. Surface activity today was scattered from the flow front to about 2.2 kilometers (1.4 miles) upslope of Apaʻa Street. The most persistent breakout was at the 2.2 kilometer (1.4 mile) distance traveling northward. Pāhoehoe toes were oozing from a broad front 135 meters (148 yards) across.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

October 30, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:5,000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 29, 2014, at 11:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 30 at 12:00 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49590, -154.95256 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow advanced about 65 meters (70 yards) during the preceding 24.5 hours. At the time of mapping, the tip of the flow was stalled, but a few tiny oozing breakouts were active just upslope from the front. The tip of the flow was 155 meters (170 yards) from Pāhoa Village Road.

Surface activity also continues elsewhere on the flow. A new breakout occurred along the north margin of the flow about 100 m downslope from Pāhoa cemetery. The breakout was moving downslope along the north margin of the flow, and was active as of 6:30 PM. Another breakout was active along the north margin of the flow just above Apaʻa Street, and heading in a northeast direction. The actively advancing part of the breakout was 100 meters (110 yards) from Apaʻa Street.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

October 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:5,000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 28, 2014, at 1:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 29 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow advanced about 170 meters (185 yards) during the preceding 22.5 hours, traveling through private property. The flow was 215 meters (235 yd) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road at the time of mapping. A crudely mapped finger was also active just outside the same private property along the north side of the flow.

Flow inflation over the past several days has lifted the flow surface higher than the old cane field berm just upslope from Apaʻa Street. Two new breakouts from along the north edge of the flow started yesterday and overtopped the berm. Though not large, the more vigorous of the two breakouts was following the previously projected steepest-descent path that passes just east of the transfer station.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 24, 2014, at 12:10 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 29 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49544, -154.95292 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the active lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 24, 2014, at 12:10 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 29 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. Surface activity today was scattered from the flow front to about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) upslope, where breakouts have been persisted for several weeks across the surface and along the sides of the flow field, before it necks down into the finger now advancing toward Pāhoa Village Road. A few other breakouts were active farther upslope, west of Kaohe Homesteads, and a single small breakout was active on the flow field about 5 kilometers (3 miles) downslope from the vent.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 24, 2014, at 12:10 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 29 at 11:30 AM is shown in red.

The front of the June 27th flow continues to advance as a narrow finger, and was 215 meters (235 yards) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road at the time of mapping. The flow front was up about 50 meters (55 yards) wide, but was much narrower in some areas where its width was confined by topography and obstacles. (see large map)

October 28, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:5000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 27, 2014, at 11:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 28 at 1:00 PM is shown in red. The mapping today was focused on the immediate flow front region, and did not cover the western margin of the flow near Apaʻa St. (see marked margin). Also, another lobe upslope of Cemetery Rd. is not shown in this map, but it only advanced about 30 m (33 yards) over the past day. The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow advanced about 150 meters (164 yards) between these two mapping times, and was advancing through private property this afternoon. At the time of mapping (1 PM), the flow was 390 meters (430 yards) directly upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The latitude and longitude of the front as of 1 PM was 19.49412, -154.95378 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). Though not shown on this map, the flow front advanced an additional 70 meters (77 yards) by 5:30 PM.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

October 27, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:12,000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 26, 2014, at 12:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 27 at 11:30 AM is shown in red. The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow advanced about 180 meters (200 yards) during the preceding 23 hours, and reached thick vegetation beyond the northeast edge of the lush pasture that the flow had been traversing. At the time of mapping, the flow was 540 meters (590 yards) directly upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.49307, -154.95469 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). Though not shown on this map, the flow advanced an additional 30 meters (33 yards) by 4:30 PM.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

October 26, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:12,000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 25, 2014, at 5:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 26 at 12:30 PM is shown in red. The dotted blue lines show steepest-descent paths in the area, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.492276, -154.956200 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84).

The flow advanced about 190 meters (210 yards) during the preceding 19.5 hours, traveling completely through the cemetery above Pāhoa. At the time of mapping, the flow was 715 meters (780 yards) directly upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The flow was advancing downslope between two intersecting steepest-descent paths and was trending toward the southern one. The flow will likely return to the original steepest-descent path about 300 m (330 yd) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road, if it continues.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

October 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front map at 1:12,000 scale

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 24, 2014, at 12:10 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 25 at 5:00 PM is shown in red. The dotted blue lines show the pertinent steepest-descent paths, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM).

The flow advanced about 315 m (345 yd) during the past 29 hours, crossing Apaʻa Street/Cemetery Road at about 3:50 AM this morning, and was about 80 m (260 ft) from the Pāhoa Cemetery at 5 PM. The flow was deflected away from the steepest-descent line it had been generally following, and toward the cemetery, by an old man-made cane-field berm just above Apaʻa Street. The flow is advancing downslope between two intersecting steepest-descent paths and will likely return to the original steepest-descent path about 300 m (330 yd) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road, if it continues.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue lines can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. For calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

October 24, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 22, 2014, at 1:50 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 24 at 12:10 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the front of the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa was 19.48901, -154.95947 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 22, 2014, at 1:50 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 24 at 12:10 PM is shown in red. Surface activity was mostly focused along the narrow finger of lava advancing toward Pāhoa, but other breakouts remain active up to about 3 km (2 miles) upslope from the tip of the flow. Persistent breakouts near where lava first enters ground cracks are no longer active.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 22, 2014, at 1:50 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 24 at 12:10 PM is shown in red.

The front of the June 27th flow continues to advance as a narrow finger, and was 150 m (165 yd) upslope from Apaʻa Street at the time of mapping. The flow front was about 50 m (55 yd) wide and moving at a rate of about 10 m (33 ft) per hour through the morning. A slightly broader and slower-moving lobe splits off from the southeast edge of the finger about 300 m (330 yd) back from the front, and it was about 250 m (275 yd) from Apaʻa Street.

The dotted blue lines show the pertinent steepest-descent paths, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 20, 2014, at 1:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 22 at 1:50 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front was 19.48343, -154.96314 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 20, 2014, at 1:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 22 at 1:50 PM is shown in red. While breakouts were scattered across the leading 2 km (1.2 mi) of the flow, most surface activity was within the leading 700 m (765 yd). A few tiny breakouts were also still active about mid-way along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 20, 2014, at 1:00 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 22 at 1:50 PM is shown in red.

Today, the June 27th flow was once again moving closer to Apaʻa Street. The flow front was a narrow finger, 20 to 50 m (22–55 yd) wide, traveling downslope within a gully on private land. Because the flow was quite narrow, it was advancing relatively rapidly – it went 370 m (405 yd) in the past 2 days – but it will likely slow down when it reaches more level terrain just above Apaʻa Street. When mapped from the air this afternoon, the flow was about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) upslope from the closest point along Apaʻa Street, as measured in a straight line, and about 1.0 km (0.6 mi) upslope as measured along the path of steepest-descent that the flow has been following for several weeks.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 20, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 17, 2014, at 7:40 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 20 at 1:00 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front, which had moved no closer to Pāhoa, was 19.48277 , -154.96556 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 17, 2014, at 7:40 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 20 at 1:00 PM is shown in red. Breakouts were scattered across the leading 2 km (1.2 mi) of the flow, and there were a few small breakouts mid-way along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 17, 2014, at 7:40 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 20 at 1:00 PM is shown in red. The flow front did not advance and was still about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) upslope from the closest point along Apaʻa Street (Cemetery Road), as measured in a straight line, and about 1.3 km (0.8 mi) upslope measured along the path of steepest-descent that the flow has been following.

A narrow finger has been advancing about 80 m (90 yd) per day along the southeast edge of the flow, near the front, for the past week. At that rate, the finger of lava should overtake the front in the next day or two. It will likely follow the same steepest-descent path that the flow has been following. Other breakouts upslope from the flow front have caused additional widening the flow. The flow is about 670 m (730 yd – more than 7 football fields end to end) across about 1.3 km (0.8 mi) back from the front.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 17, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 15, 2014, at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 17 at 7:40 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front, which was barely active at that time, was 19.48277 , -154.96556 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 15, 2014, at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 17 at 7:40 AM is shown in red. Breakouts were scattered across the leading 1.9 km (1.2 mi) of the flow, and there were a few small breakouts mid-way along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 15, 2014, at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 17 at 7:40 AM is shown in red. The flow front advanced about 50 m (55 yd) since our October 15, 2014, overflight. The flow front is still about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) upslope from the closest point along Apaʻa Street (Cemetery Road), as measured in a straight line, and about 1.3 km (0.8 mi) measured along the path of steepest-descent that the flow has been following.

A 10-day flow projection is not included because of the very low flow advance rate over the past several days. The flow, however, could speed up again at any time (or slow down even further); it could stall, and a new active flow front could start again farther upslope; or the flow could stop altogether.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 15, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 13, 2014, at 9:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 15 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.48271, -154.96598 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 13, 2014, at 9:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 15 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. Breakouts were mainly scattered across the leading 1.8 km (1.1 mi) of the flow, and midway along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 13, 2014, at 9:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 15 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. The flow front advanced about 50 m (55 yd) since our October 13, 2014, overflight. The flow front is still about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) upslope from the closest point along Apaʻa Street (Cemetery Road), as measured in a straight line, and about 1.3 km (0.8 mi) measured along the path of steepest-descent that the flow is currently following.

A 10-day flow projection is not included because of the very low flow advance rate over the past two days. The flow, however, could speed up again at any time (or slow down even further); it could stall, and a new active flow front could start again farther upslope; or the flow could stop altogether.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 13, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 10, 2014, at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 13 at 9:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.48305, -154.96630 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 10, 2014, at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 13 at 9:30 AM is shown in red. Breakouts were mainly scattered across the leading 2.1 km (1.3 mi) of the flow, and midway along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. A few other small breakouts were active along the flow between these two main areas of activity. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 10, 2014, at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 13 at 9:30 AM is shown in red. The flow front advanced about 220 m (240 yd) since our October 10, 2014, overflight. This puts the flow front about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) upslope from the closest point along Apaʻa Street (Cemetery Road), as measured in a straight line, or about 1.4 km (0.9 mi) measured along the path of steepest-descent that the flow is currently following.

The solid blue line with the arrowhead shows the projected path of the flow over the next 10 days (to October 23), based on the steepest-descent path and the average advance rate of 74 m/day (81 yd/day) calculated for the period since October 6. The amount of lava erupted from the June 27th vent, and the advance rate of the resulting lava flow, have been variable. The flow could speed up or slow down; the flow front could stall again, and a new active flow front could start again farther upslope; or the flow could stop altogether. Thus, this projection is subject to change.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 10, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 8, 2014, at 10:20 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 10 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.48188, -154.96789 (Decimal Degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. Changes to the flow field are barely visible at this scale.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 8, 2014, at 10:20 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 10 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. Breakouts were mainly scattered across the leading 1.5 km (1 mi) of the flow, and midway along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. A few other breakouts were active on the surface within the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. Most of the changes to the flow margins just upslope from the flow front are due to more precise mapping today, rather than actual flow widening. The overall activity level was relatively low.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 8, 2014, at 10:20 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 10 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. Most of the changes to the flow margins just upslope from the flow front are due to more precise mapping today, rather than actual flow widening. The flow front advanced about 115 m (126 yd) since our October 8, 2014, overflight. This puts the flow front about 1.3 km (0.8 mi) upslope from the closest point along Apaʻa Street, as measured in a straight line, or about 1.6 km (1.0 mi) measured along the projected path of steepest-descent.

The solid blue line with the arrowhead shows the projected path of the flow over the next 10 days (to October 20), based on the steepest-descent path and the average advance rate of 86 m/day (94 yd/day) calculated for the period since October 3. The amount of lava erupted from the June 27th vent, and the advance rate of the resulting lava flow, have been variable. The flow could speed up or slow down; the flow front could stall again, and a new active flow front could start again farther upslope; or the flow could stop altogether. Thus, this projection is subject to change.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line can be used to infer only an approximate flow path. (see large map)

October 8, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 6, 2014, at 12:15 PM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on October 8 at 10:20 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.48107, -154.96857 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 6 at 12:15 PM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on October 8 at 10:20 AM is shown in red. Breakouts were mainly scattered across the leading edge of the flow. A few other breakouts were active on the surface within the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 6, 2014, at 12:15 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 8 at 10:20 PM is shown in red. The flow front advanced about 200 m (220 yd) since our October 6, 2014, overflight. This puts the flow front about 1.7 km (1.1 mi) upslope from Apaʻa Street, as measured along the path of steepest-descent.

The solid blue line with the arrowhead shows the projected path of the flow over the next 10 days (to October 16), based on the steepest-descent path and the average advance rate of 120 m/day (130 yd/day) achieved since September 29. The amount of lava erupted from the June 27th vent, and the advance rate of the resulting lava flow, have been variable. The flow could speed up or slow down; the flow front could stall again, and a new active flow front could start again farther upslope; or the flow could stop altogether. Thus, this projection is subject to change.

The dotted blue line shows the steepest-descent path, calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/), that the flow is projected to follow. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the dotted blue line indicates an approximate flow path direction. (see large map)

October 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th lava flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 3, 2014, at 9:20 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 6 at 12:15 PM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.48026, -154.97030 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on October 3, 2014, at 9:20 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 6 at 12:15 PM is shown in red. Breakouts were mainly scattered across the leading 1.5 km (1 mi) of the flow, and midway along the length of the flow where lava first entered the crack system. A few other breakouts were active on the surface within the crack system. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The area of the flow on October 3, 2014, at 9:20 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 6 at 12:15 PM is shown in red. The flow front advanced about 360 m (390 yd) since our October 3, 2014, overflight. This puts the flow front about 1.7 km (1.1 mi) directly upslope from Apaʻa Street. The distance is 1.9 km (1.2 mi) when measured along the path of steepest-descent.

The blue line and arrowhead shows the projected path of the flow over the next 10 days (to October 16), based on the steepest-descent path and the average advance rate of 120 m/day (130 yd/day) achieved since October 3. This projection is subject to change because the amount of lava erupted from the June 27th vent, and the advance rate of the resulting lava flow, have been variable. The flow could speed up or slow down; the flow front could stall again, and a new active flow front could start again farther upslope; or the flow could stop altogether. (see large map)

October 3, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on October 01 at 09:40 AM is shown in pink and the flow as mapped on October 03 at 09:20 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.47775, -154.97252 (Decimal degrees; WGS84).

Small breakouts, comprised of Pāhoehoe toes and lobes, were scattered across the leading edge of the flow. The flow front has advanced 270 m (295 yards) since our Oct 1, 2014 over flight. The northern lobe is inactive as of today. Several breakouts were also active along the margin of the flow upslope of the leading edge and midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. Small breakouts were scattered across the leading edge of the flow today. Lava continues to advance downslope and extended the front by about 270 m (295 yards) since our October 1, 2014 over flight. Several breakouts were also active along the margin of the flow upslope of the leading edge and midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. Surface activity comprised of Pāhoehoe toes and lobes were scattered across the leading edge of the flow. Lava continued to advance downslope and extended the front by about 270 m (295 yards) since Wednesday, October 1, 2014. (see large map)

October 1, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 29 at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 01 at 09:40 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.47701, -154.97528 (Decimal degrees; WGS84).

Small breakouts were still scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the front. The closest surface activity to Pāhoa is a breakout upslope of the stalled front that has now overtaken and extended the front by about 30 m (33 yards). Several breakouts were also active midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. Small breakouts were still scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the front. A breakout upslope of the stalled front has now overtaken and extended the front by about 30 m (33 yards). Several breakouts were also active midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. Surface activity near the flow front was advancing slowly northeast in two lobes. The active lobe farthest from the vent (the closest to Pāhoa) has now overtaken the stalled front and extended it by about 30 m (33 yards). It traveled about 150 m (273 yards) since Monday, September 29. A second lobe was about 450 m (492 yards) back from the stalled front, and it moved only about 140 m (153 yards) since Monday. (see large map)

September 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 26, 2014, at 11:15 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 29 at 10:30 AM is shown in red. The latitude and longitude of the flow front at that time was 19.47634, -154.97677 (Decimal degrees; WGS84).

The distal tip of the flow was inactive, but small breakouts were scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the stalled front. The closest surface activity to Pāhoa was about 125 m (137 yards) behind the stalled front. Several breakouts were also active midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. Small breakouts were scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the stalled front. Several breakouts were also active midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. Surface activity near the flow front was advancing slowly northeast in two lobes. The lobe farthest from the vent (the closest to Pāhoa) was about 125 m (137 yards) behind the stalled flow front. It traveled about 80 m (87 yards) since Friday, September 26. A second lobe was about 580 m (634 yards) back from the stalled front, and it moved only about 65 m (71 yards) since Friday. (see large map)

September 26, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 24, 2014, at 10:45 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 26 at 11:15 AM is shown in red. The distal tip of the flow was inactive, but small breakouts were scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the stalled front. The most substantial breakouts were on top of a pad of lava within the crack system about 5 km (3 miles) back from the stalled front, and midway along the length of the flow just upslope from where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The most vigorous breakouts were on top of a pad of lava within the crack system about 5 km (3 miles) back from the stalled front, and midway along the length of the flow just upslope from where lava first entered the crack system.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses satellite imagery acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The flow front closest to the transfer station was inactive, but small, sluggish breakouts were scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the stalled front. None of these breakouts near the stalled front was advancing significantly. (see large map)

September 24, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 19, 2014, at 11:45 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 24 at 10:45 AM is shown in red. The distal tip of the flow was inactive, but small breakouts were scattered across the surface of the flow from just behind the front to about 4 km (2.5 miles) upslope. The most active of these breakouts was advancing northeast from the north edge of the flow about 750 m (820 yards) back from the stalled front, but was fairly weak. It was 15.7 km (9.8 miles) straight-line distance from the vent.

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the most-active, slowly advancing breakout on September 24 was 19.473080, -154.981264 (Decimal degrees; WGS84).

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses satellite imagery acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The flow front closest to the transfer station was inactive, but small, sluggish breakouts were scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the stalled front. The most active breakout was advancing northeast from the north margin of the flow. Because the flow has not been advancing at its leading edge, we do not project its advance at this time. (see large map)

September 19, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 17, 2014, at 3:45 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 19 at 11:45 AM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 16.4 km (10.2 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 2.4 km (1.5 miles) upslope from Cemetery Road. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) was 18.7 km (11.6 miles).

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on topography. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 19 was 19.47593/-154.975505 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on topography (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses satellite imagery acquired in March 2014 as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The blue line and arrowheads show the projected path of the flow over the next two weeks (to October 3), based on the average flow rate over the last two days and the local topography. Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change. Satellite image provided by Digital Globe. (see large map)

September 17, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kîlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 15, 2014, at 2:00 PM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on September 17 at 3:45 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 16.0 km (10 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and had crossed the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve boundary into the vacant northwest corner of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front was advancing toward the northeast and was 3.76 km (2.3 miles) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 18.2 km (11.3 miles). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kîlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 17 was 19.4737016 /-154.977834 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The purple arrows show the projected path of the flow over the coming two weeks, based on the current flow activity and local topography. Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change. Satellite image provided by Digital Globe. (see large map)

September 15, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 12, 2014, at 12:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 15 at 2:00 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 15.5 km (9.6 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and had crossed the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve boundary into the vacant northwest corner of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front was advancing toward the northeast and was 4.3 km (2.7 miles) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 17.7 km (11.0 miles). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 15 was 19.469506 /-154.981172 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

September 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s ERZ flow field

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone on September 12, 2014. The area of the flow on September 10, 2014, at 2:45 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 12 at 12:30 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 14.9 km (9.3 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 0.17 km (0.1 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 17.1 km (10.6 miles). The flow was advancing toward the northeast. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s ERZ flow field

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 12 was 19.46388/-154.98343 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, with digital surface data provided by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which have partly controlled the June 27th flow’s advance direction. The June 27th flow as of September 10, 2014, at 2:45 PM is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~12:30 PM on September 12) is shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow was advancing toward the northeast. (see large map)

September 10, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone on September 10, 2014. The area of the flow on September 8, 2014, at 12:45 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 10 at 2:45 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 14.5 km (9.0 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 0.6 km (0.4 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 16.6 km (10.3 miles). The flow was advancing toward the northeast. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 8 was 19.460895/-154.986613 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, with digital surface data provided by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which have partly controlled the June 27th flow’s advance direction. The June 27th flow as of September 8, 2014, at 12:45 PM is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~2:45 PM on September 10) is shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow was advancing toward the northeast. (see large map)

September 8, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 8, 2014. The area of the flow on September 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 8 at ~12:45 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 13.7 km (8.5 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The flow was advancing toward the north, roughly parallel to the Forest Reserve boundary. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on September 6 at ~11:10 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 8 at ~12:45 PM is shown in red. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 8 was 19.455405/-154.991771 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, courtesy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which have partly controlled the June 27th flow’s advance direction. The June 27th flow as of September 6 is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~12:45 PM on September 8) is partly transparent and shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow was advancing toward the north, and its front was at the location of the last obvious east-northeast-trending structure visible on the map. (see large map)

September 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 6, 2014. The area of the flow on September 3 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 6 at ~11:10 AM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 13.2 km (8.2 miles) from the vent and 1.4 km (0.9 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve, and was advancing toward the north, roughly parallel to the Forest Reserve boundary. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on September 3 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 6 at ~11:10 AM is shown in red. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. September 6 point Lat/Lon position: 19.448003/-154.992676 Decimal Degrees; WGS84. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, courtesy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which are partly controlling the June 27th flow’s advance direction. They are not old lava channels. The June 27th flow as of September 3 is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~11:10 AM on September 6) is partly transparent and shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow had mostly filled a ground crack (which extended to the west and was steaming) and was advancing toward the north. (see large map)

September 4, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Small-scale map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 4, 2014. Lava on the surface at 1 PM, outlined in red, was 13.3 km (8.3 miles) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The front of the flow was spilling into another crack, which was steaming. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. For an explanation of down-slope path calculations see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Large-scale map showing the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. Flow advancement is illustrated with black dots which show the flow front on specific dates. The most distant surface lava at 1 PM on September 4, outlined in red, was 13.3 km (8.3 miles) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. September 4 point Lat/Lon position: 19.446211/-154.990149 Decimal Degrees; WGS84. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/of2007-1264.pdf). (see large map)

Map showing shaded-relief map of ERZ near flow front

This shaded-relief map, courtesy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks and faults that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. The June 27th flow is partly transparent and shown in pink, while the active surface lava at 1 PM on September 4 are outlined in red. The front of the western of these three pads of lava was entering another ground crack, which was steaming. (see large map)

September 3, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 3, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on September 1 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of September 3 is shown in red. Last night, lava welled up out of the crack it was filling and spilled out onto the ground to feed new surface flows. As of early afternoon today (September 3), lava on the surface was 13.2 km (8.2 miles) from the vent and 1.3 km (0.8 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

September 1, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 1, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of September 1 is shown in red. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the distal end of the flow, where lava in the forest had reached 12.6 km (7.8 miles) from the vent. Most lava at the far end of the flow, however, was cascading into a deep ground crack (brown line), which was steaming at the surface. The most distant steam, which may represent the leading end of the lava in the crack, was 12.9 km (7.9 miles) from the vent and 1.7 km (1.1 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line within the flow marks the lava tube. (see large map)

August 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 29, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 28 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 29 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that has channeled lava to the east. Over the past day, lava has emerged from this ground crack with a small amount spilling onto the surface. The farthest reach of this lava, marked on the map, was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. (see large map)

August 28, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 28, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 27 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 28 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the most distant surface breakout, which was 8.6 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it later emerged to form a new pad of lava. Yesterday, there was no surface activity there and no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. This morning, however, steam was rising above a crack extending east beyond the end of the lava pad, suggesting that lava was once again advancing within a crack below ground. The most distant steaming area was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. (see large map)

August 27, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 27, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 25 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 27 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days. The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.5 km (7.1 miles) east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.0 km (1.9 miles) from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. However, the tip of the flow was inactive today and there was no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. The most distant active flows were 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 25, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 25 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days. The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.4 km east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.1 km from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. A more northerly branch of the flow, which intersected the southern edge of an older flow, has declined in vigor over the last couple of days. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 22, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 22 is shown in red. The heavy brown line marks the extent of steaming along a ground crack into which lava is flowing. Though lava is not visible within the crack, it is inferred that lava is using the crack as a pathway to continue its advance to the northeast. A more northerly branch of the flow is entering a different part of the forest about midway along the length of the flow. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of August 12, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 12 is shown in red. The recently active (2013–2014) Kahaualeʻa flows are shown in orange, and all older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. The yellow line is the approximate trace of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of August 6, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on July 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 6 is shown in red. The recently active (2013–2014) Kahaualeʻa flows are shown in orange, and all older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. (see large map)

July 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. The area of the flow as mapped on July 18 is shown in pink, while widening of the flow as of July 29 is shown in red. Older lava flows are distinguished by color: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange; early episode 61 flows (2011–2013) are very light tan; and the recent episode 61 Kahaualeʻa flows (2013–2014) are reddish orange. (see large map)

July 18, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of "June 27 breakout" flow near Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Map showing the “June 27 breakout” flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. The area of the new flow as mapped on June 30 is shown in pink, while widening of the flow as July 18 is shown in red. Older lava flows are distinguished by color: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange; the 2011–2013 episode 61 flows are very light tan; and the 2013–2014 Kahaualeʻa flows are reddish orange. (see large map)

June 30, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27 breakout in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27, 2014, breakout at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. The area of the new flow as mapped on June 27 is shown in pink, while widening of the flow as June 30 is shown in red. Older lava flows are distinguished by color: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange, and 2011–2013 episode 61 flows are very light tan. The 2013–2014 Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, which is now dead, is reddish orange. (see large map)

Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s ERZ flow field

Map showing the June 27, 2014, breakout and the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of June 30, 2014. The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow (pale orange) is no longer active — it was beheaded when the lava level at Puʻu ʻŌʻō dropped with the onset of the June 27 breakout. The area of the new flow as mapped on June 27 is shown in pink, while widening of the flow as June 30 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. (see large map)

June 27, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s ERZ flow field

Map showing the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow (pink) in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of June 17, 2014. The most distant active Kahaualeʻa 2 lava flows were 7.1 km (4.4 miles) straight-line distance northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. A new breakout (shown in red) started today on the northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō and is sending new lava flows toward the northeast. Time will tell if these new flows rob the supply of lava to the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, causing it to stall. Older lava flows are distinguished by color: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange, and episode 61 flows (2011–2013) are reddish orange. The Kahaualeʻa 2 lava tube is shown with a yellow line (dashed where its position is poorly known). (see large map)

May 7, 2012 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea Summit Area Map

Map of the summit area of Kīlauea showing the location of the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook vent, and road and trail closures in response to the eruption. Kīlauea's caldera is located within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. (see large map)