HVO Maps

Maps

September 19, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 17, 2014, at 3:45 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 19 at 11:45 AM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 16.4 km (10.2 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 2.4 km (1.5 miles) upslope from Cemetery Road. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) was 18.7 km (11.6 miles).

The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on topography. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 19 was 19.47593/-154.975505 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on topography (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses satellite imagery acquired in March 2014 as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The blue line and arrowheads show the projected path of the flow over the next two weeks (to October 3), based on the average flow rate over the last two days and the local topography. Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change. Satellite image provided by Digital Globe. (see large map)

September 17, 2014 — Kīlauea


Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kîlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 17 was 19.4737016 /-154.977834 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kîlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 15, 2014, at 2:00 PM is shown in pink, while advancement of the flow as mapped on September 17 at 3:45 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 16.0 km (10 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and had crossed the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve boundary into the vacant northwest corner of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front was advancing toward the northeast and was 3.76 km (2.3 miles) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 18.2 km (11.3 miles). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Satellite image of area around flow front

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 as a base image to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. The purple arrows show the projected path of the flow over the coming two weeks, based on the current flow activity and local topography. Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change. Satellite image provided by Digital Globe. (see large map)

September 15, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 12, 2014, at 12:30 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 15 at 2:00 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 15.5 km (9.6 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and had crossed the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve boundary into the vacant northwest corner of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front was advancing toward the northeast and was 4.3 km (2.7 miles) upslope from Pāhoa Village Road. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 17.7 km (11.0 miles). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 15 was 19.469506 /-154.981172 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

September 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of Kīlauea’s ERZ flow field

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone on September 12, 2014. The area of the flow on September 10, 2014, at 2:45 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 12 at 12:30 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 14.9 km (9.3 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 0.17 km (0.1 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 17.1 km (10.6 miles). The flow was advancing toward the northeast. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

Large-scale map of Kīlauea’s ERZ flow field

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 12 was 19.46388/-154.98343 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the digital elevation model (DEM) perfectly represents the earth's surface. But, DEMs are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. The purple arrow shows a short term projection of flow direction based on the flow behavior over the past several days and the local topography. (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, with digital surface data provided by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which have partly controlled the June 27th flow’s advance direction. The June 27th flow as of September 10, 2014, at 2:45 PM is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~12:30 PM on September 12) is shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow was advancing toward the northeast. (see large map)

September 10, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone on September 10, 2014. The area of the flow on September 8, 2014, at 12:45 PM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 10 at 2:45 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 14.5 km (9.0 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 0.6 km (0.4 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 16.6 km (10.3 miles). The flow was advancing toward the northeast. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 8 was 19.460895/-154.986613 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, with digital surface data provided by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which have partly controlled the June 27th flow’s advance direction. The June 27th flow as of September 8, 2014, at 12:45 PM is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~2:45 PM on September 10) is shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow was advancing toward the northeast. (see large map)

September 8, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 8, 2014. The area of the flow on September 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 8 at ~12:45 PM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 13.7 km (8.5 miles; straight-line distance) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The flow was advancing toward the north, roughly parallel to the Forest Reserve boundary. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on September 6 at ~11:10 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 8 at ~12:45 PM is shown in red. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. The latitude and longitude of the flow front on September 8 was 19.455405/-154.991771 (Decimal degrees; WGS84). The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, courtesy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which have partly controlled the June 27th flow’s advance direction. The June 27th flow as of September 6 is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~12:45 PM on September 8) is partly transparent and shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow was advancing toward the north, and its front was at the location of the last obvious east-northeast-trending structure visible on the map. (see large map)

September 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 6, 2014. The area of the flow on September 3 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 6 at ~11:10 AM is shown in red. The front of the active flow was 13.2 km (8.2 miles) from the vent and 1.4 km (0.9 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve, and was advancing toward the north, roughly parallel to the Forest Reserve boundary. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The area of the flow on September 3 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on September 6 at ~11:10 AM is shown in red. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. September 6 point Lat/Lon position: 19.448003/-154.992676 Decimal Degrees; WGS84. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). (see large map)

Shaded-relief map of East Rift Zone near flow front

This shaded-relief map, courtesy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks, faults, and grabens (down-dropped blocks between adjacent faults; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/glossary/?term=graben) that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, and which are partly controlling the June 27th flow’s advance direction. They are not old lava channels. The June 27th flow as of September 3 is shown in pink, while flow advance since then (as of ~11:10 AM on September 6) is partly transparent and shown in red. At the time of the mapping, the flow had mostly filled a ground crack (which extended to the west and was steaming) and was advancing toward the north. (see large map)

September 4, 2014 — Kīlauea


Small-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Small-scale map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 4, 2014. Lava on the surface at 1 PM, outlined in red, was 13.3 km (8.3 miles) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. The front of the flow was spilling into another crack, which was steaming. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. For an explanation of down-slope path calculations see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. (see large map)

Large-scale map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Large-scale map showing the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. Flow advancement is illustrated with black dots which show the flow front on specific dates. The most distant surface lava at 1 PM on September 4, outlined in red, was 13.3 km (8.3 miles) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. September 4 point Lat/Lon position: 19.446211/-154.990149 Decimal Degrees; WGS84. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/of2007-1264.pdf). (see large map)

Map showing shaded-relief map of ERZ near flow front

This shaded-relief map, courtesy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, shows some of the cracks and faults that are present in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. The June 27th flow is partly transparent and shown in pink, while the active surface lava at 1 PM on September 4 are outlined in red. The front of the western of these three pads of lava was entering another ground crack, which was steaming. (see large map)

September 3, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 3, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on September 1 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of September 3 is shown in red. Last night, lava welled up out of the crack it was filling and spilled out onto the ground to feed new surface flows. As of early afternoon today (September 3), lava on the surface was 13.2 km (8.2 miles) from the vent and 1.3 km (0.8 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (see large map)

September 1, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 1, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of September 1 is shown in red. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the distal end of the flow, where lava in the forest had reached 12.6 km (7.8 miles) from the vent. Most lava at the far end of the flow, however, was cascading into a deep ground crack (brown line), which was steaming at the surface. The most distant steam, which may represent the leading end of the lava in the crack, was 12.9 km (7.9 miles) from the vent and 1.7 km (1.1 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line within the flow marks the lava tube. (see large map)

August 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 29, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 28 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 29 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that has channeled lava to the east. Over the past day, lava has emerged from this ground crack with a small amount spilling onto the surface. The farthest reach of this lava, marked on the map, was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. (see large map)

August 28, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 28, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 27 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 28 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the most distant surface breakout, which was 8.6 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it later emerged to form a new pad of lava. Yesterday, there was no surface activity there and no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. This morning, however, steam was rising above a crack extending east beyond the end of the lava pad, suggesting that lava was once again advancing within a crack below ground. The most distant steaming area was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. (see large map)

August 27, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 27, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 25 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 27 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days. The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.5 km (7.1 miles) east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.0 km (1.9 miles) from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. However, the tip of the flow was inactive today and there was no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. The most distant active flows were 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 25, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 25 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days. The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.4 km east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.1 km from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. A more northerly branch of the flow, which intersected the southern edge of an older flow, has declined in vigor over the last couple of days. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 22, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 22 is shown in red. The heavy brown line marks the extent of steaming along a ground crack into which lava is flowing. Though lava is not visible within the crack, it is inferred that lava is using the crack as a pathway to continue its advance to the northeast. A more northerly branch of the flow is entering a different part of the forest about midway along the length of the flow. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of August 12, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 12 is shown in red. The recently active (2013–2014) Kahaualeʻa flows are shown in orange, and all older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. The yellow line is the approximate trace of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of August 6, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on July 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 6 is shown in red. The recently active (2013–2014) Kahaualeʻa flows are shown in orange, and all older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. (see large map)

May 7, 2012 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea Summit Area Map

Map of the summit area of Kīlauea showing the location of the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook vent, and road and trail closures in response to the eruption. Kīlauea's caldera is located within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. (see large map)