HVO Maps

Maps

August 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 29, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 28 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 29 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that has channeled lava to the east. Over the past day, lava has emerged from this ground crack with a small amount spilling onto the surface. The farthest reach of this lava, marked on the map, was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. (see large map)

August 28, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 28, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 27 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 28 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the most distant surface breakout, which was 8.6 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it later emerged to form a new pad of lava. Yesterday, there was no surface activity there and no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. This morning, however, steam was rising above a crack extending east beyond the end of the lava pad, suggesting that lava was once again advancing within a crack below ground. The most distant steaming area was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. (see large map)

August 27, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 27, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 25 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 27 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days. The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.5 km (7.1 miles) east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.0 km (1.9 miles) from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. However, the tip of the flow was inactive today and there was no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. The most distant active flows were 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 25, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 22 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 25 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days. The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.4 km east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.1 km from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. A more northerly branch of the flow, which intersected the southern edge of an older flow, has declined in vigor over the last couple of days. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


Map of June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s ERZ

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 22, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 22 is shown in red. The heavy brown line marks the extent of steaming along a ground crack into which lava is flowing. Though lava is not visible within the crack, it is inferred that lava is using the crack as a pathway to continue its advance to the northeast. A more northerly branch of the flow is entering a different part of the forest about midway along the length of the flow. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of August 12, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on August 6 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 12 is shown in red. The recently active (2013–2014) Kahaualeʻa flows are shown in orange, and all older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. The yellow line is the approximate trace of the lava tube feeding the flow. (see large map)

August 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea’s east rift zone flow field

Map showing the June 27th flow at Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of August 6, 2014. The area of the flow as mapped on July 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 6 is shown in red. The recently active (2013–2014) Kahaualeʻa flows are shown in orange, and all older lava flows (1983–2013) are shown in gray. (see large map)

May 7, 2012 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea Summit Area Map

Map of the summit area of Kīlauea showing the location of the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook vent, and road and trail closures in response to the eruption. Kīlauea's caldera is located within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. (see large map)