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Kilauea

3 November 2000

Kamoukuna ocean entry plume and coastline along the Kilauea Volcano flow field, Hawai`i
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Left: Only one bench is forming at the Kamokuna entry. The steam plume is positioned at the eastern side of the bench. This marvelous view of the coastline is due to such clear air this morning, after a record-setting rainstorm.

Right: Glow was seen early this morning from Chain of Craters Road, but no active flows were visible during daylight on Pulama pali. Last week's eastern flow has stopped descending the pali. Probably this morning's glow is from a skylight. 

Active Pulama pali, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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1,995-foot elevation level skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: A new skylight at the 1,995-foot elevation was sampled this morning. The brightly incandescent lava is almost 2 m below the ground surface. The tube carrying the lava is nearly 4 m wide. Ghostly volcanologists give scale.

5 November 2000

Surface flow, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Surface flow, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: An active pahoehoe flow spreads across a small area well below Pulama pali. Right: As the skin of the flow cools and thickens, the lava oozes out between the skin and older flow to continue spreading.

Right: Hot crust on fluid pahoehoe is very viscous, as demonstrated by the ability of scientists to pull the thin crust forming on the flow.   

Testing surface flow, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Close up of 250-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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250-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: The lower roof in the tube at the 250-foot skylight has collapsed and exposes a very clear view of flowing lava.  The temperature of the surface of the lava was measured to be approximately 1130?C. Right: The area around the 250-foot elevation skylight is so cracked and broken that close approach is very dangerous.        

9 November 2000

Kamoukuna ocean entry plume and bench along the Kilauea Volcano flow field, Hawai`i
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Left: The active bench has two points where lava enters the sea. The larger one is in line with the main tube, just west of the center of the bench, and has a moderate plume. The much smaller one, on the eastern side of the bench, is fed by another tube.

1,360-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Close up of the 1,360-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Part of the 1,360-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano flow field, Hawai`i
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Above left: Up-slope view of the 1,360-foot skylight. Above right: Closer view of the 1,360-foot skylight. Left: The roof of the tube at the 1,360-foot skylight was reheated by lava flowing in the active tube. The roof partly melted, forming dripping lava strings seen here and in the close-up above. (Large images show more detail.) 

The 1,995-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: This is the most recent view of the 1,995-foot skylight, looking up the tube toward the source.

The 1,210-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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The 1,120-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: The 1,210-foot skylight is shown here in an `a`a flow. Flowing lava is about 6 m below the surface. Right: Another skylight at the 1,120-foot elevation, perhaps the one high on Pulama pali seen by the observer on recent mornings.

11 November 2000

The Frost Moon (November's full moon) illuminates vog on the coastal flat of Kilauea. The vog rolls down from Pu`u `O`o and nearby vents, blown by trade winds. View is westward at 0455.  

Vog in moonlight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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21 November 2000

Ocean Entry bench, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Lava on the ocean entry bench, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: The Kamokuna ocean entry bench has recovered from its collapse that occurred on Thursday, November 16, 2000.  Two to three lava entry points span the central third of the new bench. Right: An area of surface-flow activity is at the water's edge on the west end of the bench.
Red glow from 2,300-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Red glow from 2,300-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left:  Glow emanates from lava flowing through the tube below the 2,300-foot skylight. Right: The persistent 2300-foot skylight brightens the surrounding rock.

Map of flows from Pu`u `O`o to the ocean; September 2000

Map of lava flows on south coastal part of Kilauea Volcano as of September 2000

Large map. Map shows lava flows (red) active in September 2000 above and on Pulama pali and on the coastal plain, as well as flows erupted earlier from Pu`u `O`o and Kupaianaha. The eastern part of the active flow field (orange) extended to the Royal Gardens private access road on January 11 and entered the sea near Waha`ula on February 3-14, 2000. That flow stopped in  mid-August. A new flow (red) descended  Pulama pali and crossed the coastal plain in September, and lava is now entering the sea at Kamokuna, an area about 1.5 km west-southwest of Waha`ula. 


Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so those readers planning a visit to the volcano should contact Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park for the most current eruption information (tel. 808-985-6000).


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Updated: 1 December 2000 (JA)