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Kilauea

27 October 2000

Pu'u 'O'o, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Pu'u 'O'o Crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: Pu`u `O`o crater, seen from the air, is visible intermittently through gas and clouds that hang closely on the cone. Right: Brief glimpses of Pu`u `O`o crater floor revealed no incandescence or visible lava.
The active Kamakuna ocean entry, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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The active Pulama pali, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: A steam plume rises consistently at the Kamokuna entry as lava flows into the ocean. Right: On Pulama  pali, active pahoehoe flows on the west side of the active tube descend the 1985 `a`a flow. A narrow pahoehoe lobe recently reached the 900-foot elevation on the east lobe of the 1985 `a`a. The east lobe, now stagnant, brushed against trees in a few places, burning them and causing smoke smelled lately at the end of Chain of Craters Road.  
Close up of skylight at the 1,750-foot elevation level, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Skylight at the 1,750-foot elevation level, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: Above Pulama pali, an active pahoehoe breakout at the 1,790-foot elevation extends down to about the 1,650-foot elevation. This image is of a  new skylight on this breakout at the 1,750-foot elevation. Right: Another view through the skylight at 1,750-foot elevation into the central stream of lava coming from the breakout at 1,790 feet.
Burning vegitation under a new flow, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Flame within a pahoehoe flow, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: Flames from burning vegetation under new pahoehoe play through an older `a`a flow along the 1,790-foot elevation breakout. Right: Also at 1,790 feet, burning wood under the flow sends flames through a cylindrical chimney (likely a tree mold) in the pahoehoe. 

28 October 2000

Kamoukuna ocean entry, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Littoral Cone, ocean entry, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: The Kamokuna ocean entry glows dimly at sunset while the bench grows quietly into the sea. Such activity is accompanied by minor explosions where the surf and lava interact at the newly forming edge of the bench. Right: Recently active littoral cones, yet to be coated with sulfur and other solids deposited from the plume, stand among remnants of collapsed littoral cones on the bench. 
250-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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270-foot elevation skylight, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i
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Left: The previously bright skylight at the 250-foot elevation now is dark and entirely crusted over, with only a little glow visible within the tube. Right: A recently found skylight at the 270-foot elevation displays shallow moving lava within the tube. 

Map of flows from Pu`u `O`o to the ocean; September 2000

Map of lava flows on south coastal part of Kilauea Volcano as of September 2000

Large map. Map shows lava flows (red) active in September 2000 above and on Pulama pali and on the coastal plain, as well as flows erupted earlier from Pu`u `O`o and Kupaianaha. The eastern part of the active flow field (orange) extended to the Royal Gardens private access road on January 11 and entered the sea near Waha`ula on February 3-14, 2000. That flow stopped in  mid-August. A new flow (red) descended  Pulama pali and crossed the coastal plain in September, and lava is now entering the sea at Kamokuna, an area about 1.5 km west-southwest of Waha`ula. 


Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so those readers planning a visit to the volcano should contact Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park for the most current eruption information (tel. 808-985-6000).


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The URL of this page is http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia/archive/2000/Oct/27-28/
Contact: hvowebmaster@usgs.gov
Updated: 21 November 2000 (JNA)