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Kilauea

4 June 2001

Another pulse of magma at Kilauea

Uwekahuna, Sand Hill, and north component of Kilauea Iki tilt, Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i.
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Details of Uwekahuna tilt in past 24 hours, Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i.
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Left: Tilt at Uwekahuna (upper two plots), Sand Hill (next two plots), and north component at Kilauea Iki during past two days, showing yesterday's deflation and this morning's abrupt inflation. The tilt at Uwekahuna is shown as radial and tangential components relative to a center near Halemaumau. The tilt at Sand Hill and Kilauea Iki is shown as E-W and N-S components. Upward deflection indicates inflation at Uwekahuna and Kilauea Iki and deflation at Sand Hill. The tilt is larger at Uwekahuna than at the other two stations--typical because Uwekahuna is generally closer to the expected tilt maximum. That is why we generally use the Uwekahuna tilt in general discussions. Right: Detail of past 24 hours at Uwekahuna tiltmeter, showing yesterday's deflation and this morning's inflation. On this plot, the tilt is resolved into east-west and north-south components. To get the actual magnitude of tilt, take the square root of the sum of the squares of each component.
Tremor at North Pit on the floor of the caldera, Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i.
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Seismogram being recorded by the North Pit seismograph. The North Pit seismometer is on the caldera floor just north of Halemaumau. The record extends from about 0830 yesterday until this morning at about 0550. Note the gradual pickup in background volcanic tremor yesterday, ending abruptly with the onset of summit inflation at 0125 this morning. View this and other images of plots in large view for best results. The Moire pattern will go away in the larger views.
Two days of tilt at Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i.
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Details of Pu`u `O`o tilt in past 24 hours, Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i.
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Left: Tilt on the northwest flank of Pu`u `O`o cone. The tilt is shown as radial components relative to the center of the crater in the cone. Inflation is indicated by upward deflection of the curve. Note the gradual deflation yesterday and the sharp inflation this morning, which is still in progress. Right: Detail of past 24 hours at Pu`u `O`o cone tiltmeter, showing yesterday's deflation and this morning's sharp inflation. On this plot, the tilt is resolved into east-west and north-south components. To get the actual magnitude of tilt, take the square root of the sum of the squares of each component.

8 June 2001

Murky morning on Pulama pali, Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i.
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Yes, Kilauea can have murky days. This helicopter view through a squall shows three channels of the active east flow on Pulama pali. Note the smoke from fires along the west edge of the flow. Downed trees to right were felled by earlier flows.

 

Map of flows from Pu`u `O`o to the ocean: 22 March 2001

Map of lava flows on south coastal part of Kilauea Volcano as of 22 March 2001

Large map Map shows lava flows erupted during the 1983-present activity of Pu`u `O`o and Kupaianaha. The flows active from mid-December 2000 through 22 March 2001, above and on Pulama pali and on the coastal plain, are shown in red. Most of the recent flows are fed from breakout points at 1920-1700 feet, above the pali in the northern part of the large red area. Lava re-entered the sea just west of Kamokuna on January 21, 2001, but soon stopped when activity shifted from the western to the eastern branch of the flow. Since then, activity has been divided between the eastern and western branches. Breakouts from the eastern tube system have destroyed hundreds of meters of the Royal Gardens access road. Lava fed through the eastern system has been entering the ocean since April 25, a few hundred meters northeast of Kupapau Point. On May 31, a tiny trickle of lava fed through the western tube system dripped into the water about 500 m west of the Kamokuna bench.


Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park; be sure to click on the inDEPTH button.


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The URL of this page is http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia/archive/2001/Jun/
Contact: hvowebmaster@usgs.gov
Updated: 6 July 2001 (DAS)