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Kilauea

Note: Check Photo Glossary or a good dictionary for any terms unfamiliar to you.

Images and Chronology
Looking for images you could swear you saw here but can't find now? Check Image Archive

27 December 2007

Drained pond, "Thanksgiving Eve" breakout, and satellite shields

Drained pond 1 in foreground and TEB and satellitic shields just beyond and to the left. A recently active seep produced the pahoehoe flows directly left of pond 1.
Closeup of top of TEB shield (fuming) with drained pond 1 in foreground.
Left. Drained pond 1 in foreground and TEB and satellitic shields just beyond and to the left. A recently active seep produced the pahoehoe flows directly left of pond 1.Right.Closeup of top of TEB shield (fuming) with drained pond 1 in foreground.
Closeup of the still-incandescent supply end of the drained pond 1. Note the rockfalls from collapse of the walls and the dark lava coating the lower walls when the pond refilled in the last few weeks.
Looking up a string of satellitic shields (fuming) to the TEB shield (also fuming) in the distance. Several active toes of small flows are smoking in the foreground.
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Left. Closeup of the still-incandescent supply end of the drained pond 1. Note the rockfalls from collapse of the walls and the dark lava coating the lower walls when the pond refilled in the last few weeks.Right. Looking up a string of satellitic shields (fuming) to the TEB shield (also fuming) in the distance. Several active toes of small flows are smoking in the foreground.

20 December 2007

"Thanksgiving Eve" breakout

View from the west looking at the Thanksgiving Eve Breakout (TEB) outlet (orange glow in center of photo) and the first pond in the perched channel (upper left).  TEB lava is flowing southeast under the surface and breaking out approximately 500 m (0.3 mi) southeast (out of view).  Lava in the first pond is about 5 m (16 ft) below the rim.
View looking southwest at TEB flow.  The TEB outlet, and top of the TEB shield, is the small pointed hill in the upper right of the photo.  Two breakouts near the base of the shield have created new flows.  The upper-most breakout is the light grey lava (with incandescence) in the left half of the photo.  Pu`u `O`o is in the distance.
Left. View from the west looking at the Thanksgiving Eve Breakout (TEB) outlet (orange glow in center of photo) and the first pond in the perched channel (upper left). TEB lava is flowing southeast under the surface and breaking out approximately 500 m (0.3 mi) southeast (out of view). Lava in the first pond is about 5 m (16 ft) below the rim.Right.View looking southwest at TEB flow. The TEB outlet, and top of the TEB shield, is the small pointed hill in the upper right of the photo. Two breakouts near the base of the shield have created new flows. The upper-most breakout is the light grey lava (with incandescence) in the left half of the photo. Pu`u `O`o is in the distance.
The lower-most breakout near the base of the TEB shield is shown here, flowing southeast.  This breakout comprises a broad fan of thin pahoehoe flows.
Active pahoehoe breakout from seeps on the east side of the perched channel.
Left. The lower-most breakout near the base of the TEB shield is shown here, flowing southeast. This breakout comprises a broad fan of thin pahoehoe flows. Right.Active pahoehoe breakout from seeps on the east side of the perched channel.

13 December 2007

"Thanksgiving Eve" breakout

View of the west side of Pond 1, with lava at the rim.  Spattering is occurring at the head of a cooled overflow.
Ponded lava within a broad seep on the eastern wall of Pond 3.  The line of incandescence marks a front of overturning lava crust.  Pond 3, which lacks incandescence, is the long narrow feature just above this seep.  Just above Pond 3 is another large seep, flowing down the west flank of the perched channel.
Left. View of the west side of Pond 1, with lava at the rim. Spattering is occurring at the head of a cooled overflow. Right. Ponded lava within a broad seep on the eastern wall of Pond 3. The line of incandescence marks a front of overturning lava crust. Pond 3, which lacks incandescence, is the long narrow feature just above this seep. Just above Pond 3 is another large seep, flowing down the west flank of the perched channel.
Pahoehoe flow originating from the ponded seep on the east side of Pond 3.
Complex lava channel originating from a seep on the western side of Pond 3.  This flow is overriding lava from an earlier seep.
Left. Pahoehoe flow originating from the ponded seep on the east side of Pond 3. Right. Complex lava channel originating from a seep on the western side of Pond 3. This flow is overriding lava from an earlier seep.

10 December 2007

"Thanksgiving Eve" breakout

View of the active portion of the Thanksgiving Eve breakout, forming a narrow, braided channel to the south, extending 400 m (0.25 mi) from its source at Fissure D.  Steam marks the beginning of the perched channel, which extends towards the upper right-hand corner of the photo.
Thanksgiving Eve breakout flow emerges from the top of a small lava shield built over the last several weeks.
Left.View of the active portion of the Thanksgiving Eve breakout, forming a narrow, braided channel to the south, extending 400 m (0.25 mi) from its source at Fissure D. Steam marks the beginning of the perched channel, which extends towards the upper right-hand corner of the photo. Right. Thanksgiving Eve breakout flow emerges from the top of a small lava shield built over the last several weeks.
Lava has reoccupied the original perched channel, nearly filling the first pond (whose south end is marked by the steaming area) and resulting in overflowing of the third pond (in the foreground).  In the upper right portion of the photo, Pu`u `O`o degasses in the distance.
A large terrace of lava seeping from the side of the perched channel formed on the east side of the third pond (the third pond is just beyond the right edge of the photo).  In this view, the first pond is visible behind the seep terrace, and the start of the perched channel is marked by the steaming area.
Left. Lava has reoccupied the original perched channel, nearly filling the first pond (whose south end is marked by the steaming area) and resulting in overflowing of the third pond (in the foreground). In the upper right portion of the photo, Pu`u `O`o degasses in the distance. Right. A large terrace of lava seeping from the side of the perched channel formed on the east side of the third pond (the third pond is just beyond the right edge of the photo). In this view, the first pond is visible behind the seep terrace, and the start of the perched channel is marked by the steaming area.
Lava has not yet reentered the fourth pond, at the far end of the perched channel, shown here.  The lava currently within this pond is inactive, with its level approximately 6 meters (20 ft) below the rim.  Near the left edge of the photo is the former tube entrance, which had fed flows to the east during much of November.
Geologist sampling lava from the active seep on the east side of the perched channel.
Left. Lava has not yet reentered the fourth pond, at the far end of the perched channel, shown here. The lava currently within this pond is inactive, with its level approximately 6 meters (20 ft) below the rim. Near the left edge of the photo is the former tube entrance, which had fed flows to the east during much of November. Right. Geologist sampling lava from the active seep on the east side of the perched channel.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 31 January 2008 (pnf)