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Images and Chronology
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30 July 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

 View looking down rift on the 7/21 fissures. Tan cone to the right is Pu'u Halulu and the large shield vent behind the active, shiny lava flows is Kupaianaha.
The front of the ‘a‘a flow that is advancing to the northeast is the foreground and Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the distant background. The scattered trees within the flow are the remnants of a kipuka that was overrun the flow.
Left. View looking down rift on the 7/21 fissures. Tan cone to the right is Pu'u Halulu and the large shield vent behind the active, shiny lava flows is Kupaianaha. Right. The front of the ‘a‘a flow that is advancing to the northeast is the foreground and Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the distant background. The scattered trees within the flow are the remnants of a kipuka that was overrun the flow.
 One of the sources for lava issuing from fissure segment D that feeds the advancing ‘a‘a flow.
An oblique view of the perched lava pond being built above fissure segment B. The level top of the pond is the surface of an active lava pond. Note that the pond is nearly as high above the ground as the top of Pu'u Halulu in the background.
Left. One of the sources for lava issuing from fissure segment D that feeds the advancing ‘a‘a flow. Right. An oblique view of the perched lava pond being built above fissure segment B. The level top of the pond is the surface of an active lava pond. Note that the pond is nearly as high above the ground as the top of Pu'u Halulu in the background.

27 July 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

 Lava flows erupting from two points along the eastern-most fissure—fissure D—had merged by Friday, July 27. The combined lava output began feeding an impressive ‘a‘a flow, shown here with Pu‘u ‘O‘o in the background, that was up to 200 meters wide. The ‘a‘a flow has traveled another 1.5 km toward the northeast since this photo was taken.
This is the terminus of the ‘a‘a flow showing the relationship between the lava channel and the ‘a‘a itself.
Left. Lava flows erupting from two points along the eastern-most fissure—fissure D—had merged by Friday, July 27. The combined lava output began feeding an impressive ‘a‘a flow, shown here with Pu‘u ‘O‘o in the background, that was up to 200 meters wide. The ‘a‘a flow has traveled another 1.5 km toward the northeast since this photo was taken. Right. This is the terminus of the ‘a‘a flow showing the relationship between the lava channel and the ‘a‘a itself.
 Activity from fissure B, after a lull on Thursday, July 26, had picked up again by Friday. In this photo, lava can be seen erupting from a slightly higher part of the fissure that had become sealed over during the previous week. Lava was spreading in all directions from the erupting vents and a new perched pond was being constructed.
The photo shows off the raised profile of the perched pond being built over fissure B. The closer vent, which is slightly lower from this vantage point, was upwelling with enough force to produce a 1-m-high dome fountain. The more distant, and slightly higher, vent was topped by a 2-m-high dome fountain. A hornito positioned between the two vents, easily identified by its sharp point, was adding frequent spatter bursts to an already exciting scene.
Left. Activity from fissure B, after a lull on Thursday, July 26, had picked up again by Friday. In this photo, lava can be seen erupting from a slightly higher part of the fissure that had become sealed over during the previous week. Lava was spreading in all directions from the erupting vents and a new perched pond was being constructed. Right. The photo shows off the raised profile of the perched pond being built over fissure B. The closer vent, which is slightly lower from this vantage point, was upwelling with enough force to produce a 1-m-high dome fountain. The more distant, and slightly higher, vent was topped by a 2-m-high dome fountain. A hornito positioned between the two vents, easily identified by its sharp point, was adding frequent spatter bursts to an already exciting scene.

26 July 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

 The level of activity at the July 21 fissure eruption site has decreased in the last 24-hours. One expression of this decrease is the exposed walls along the sides of the channel carrying lava erupted from fissure B. In this photo, the exposed walls are about 5-8 m high, and the width of the stream is 10-15 m.
Fissure B lava pours over a 6-8-m-high falls as it enters the lava channel that carries the lava to the southeast.
Left. The level of activity at the July 21 fissure eruption site has decreased in the last 24-hours. One expression of this decrease is the exposed walls along the sides of the channel carrying lava erupted from fissure B. In this photo, the exposed walls are about 5-8 m high, and the width of the stream is 10-15 m. Right. Fissure B lava pours over a 6-8-m-high falls as it enters the lava channel that carries the lava to the southeast.
 Fissure D, with lava erupting from two areas, also shows signs of a decrease in lava output. The western part of fissure D (D1---see map) is now only supplying lava to a single large lava stream flowing north (to the right in this photo). A decrease in the level of the lava pond has revealed 5-m-high walls. The eastern part of fissure D (D2---see map) is also less vigorous than yesterday, sending lava a short distance to the north. The D1 vent is to the left in this photo, and the D2 vent is just to the right of the center of the image.
he termini of the two flows erupting from fissure D collide to the northeast of the fissure. In this photo, pahoehoe, ‘a‘a, and overflows from a perched pond all come together in a mishmash of lava textures.
Left. Fissure D, with lava erupting from two areas, also shows signs of a decrease in lava output. The western part of fissure D (D1---see map) is now only supplying lava to a single large lava stream flowing north (to the right in this photo). A decrease in the level of the lava pond has revealed 5-m-high walls. The eastern part of fissure D (D2---see map) is also less vigorous than yesterday, sending lava a short distance to the north. The D1 vent is to the left in this photo, and the D2 vent is just to the right of the center of the image. Right. The termini of the two flows erupting from fissure D collide to the northeast of the fissure. In this photo, pahoehoe, ‘a‘a, and overflows from a perched pond all come together in a mishmash of lava textures.

25 July 2007

Activity at Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater and flank vents

 The pond over the upper-most active fissure (Fissure B --- see map) breached a before daylight yesterday (July 24) and sent a large ‘a‘a flow heading southeast. This is a view from upslope of the fissure looking down the length of the lava channel that continues to feed the ‘a‘a flow. The upper part of the fissure has sealed over and is visible as the line of bluish fume in roughly the center of the image. The edge of Pu`u Halulu is visible to the right of the picture, and Kupaianaha is long, low dark mound to the upper left.
This is a close-up of the start of the lava flow erupting from fissure B. The hornitos in the foreground are on top of the portion of the fissure that has sealed over.
Left. The pond over the upper-most active fissure (Fissure B --- see map) breached a before daylight yesterday (July 24) and sent a large ‘a‘a flow heading southeast. This is a view from upslope of the fissure looking down the length of the lava channel that continues to feed the ‘a‘a flow. The upper part of the fissure has sealed over and is visible as the line of bluish fume in roughly the center of the image. The edge of Pu`u Halulu is visible to the right of the picture, and Kupaianaha is long, low dark mound to the upper left. Right. This is a close-up of the start of the lava flow erupting from fissure B. The hornitos in the foreground are on top of the portion of the fissure that has sealed over.
 The ‘a‘a flow being fed by fissure B is over-riding an ‘a‘a flow that was emplaced, and stagnated, during the first day of the eruption on July 21. The older flow extends off through the lower left corner of the picture, while the terminus active flow is in the center of the image and is slightly lighter in color. The active channel feeding the ‘a‘a flow can be seen in the background.
Fissure C, to the east of fissure B, also was topped by a perched lava pond until yesterday, when the lava breached the pond wall. The tall, exposed walls of the drained fissure C pond can be seen just left of center. The fissure continues to erupt and lava has begun ponding again behind the rubble rafted north by the breach of the pond wall. The lava channel from fissure B starts at the middle right side of the image, and flows to the south of (behind, in this view) fissure C.
Left. The ‘a‘a flow being fed by fissure B is over-riding an ‘a‘a flow that was emplaced, and stagnated, during the first day of the eruption on July 21. The older flow extends off through the lower left corner of the picture, while the terminus active flow is in the center of the image and is slightly lighter in color. The active channel feeding the ‘a‘a flow can be seen in the background. Right. Fissure C, to the east of fissure B, also was topped by a perched lava pond until yesterday, when the lava breached the pond wall. The tall, exposed walls of the drained fissure C pond can be seen just left of center. The fissure continues to erupt and lava has begun ponding again behind the rubble rafted north by the breach of the pond wall. The lava channel from fissure B starts at the middle right side of the image, and flows to the south of (behind, in this view) fissure C.
 The material pushed out during the breach of the fissure C pond wall 
(center frame) continues to creep forward a day later as lava erupting from fissure C (just out of sight to the right) piles up behind it.
Fissure D is the most active fissure segment and is erupting lava from two discrete areas along its length. The upper part of fissure D (labeled D1 on the map) continues to build a lava pond and is sending lava flows coursing north. The lower part of fissure D (labeled D2 on the map) has refilled its pond that breached a few days ago. In this slightly off-kilter photo, the lower part of fissure D if supplying the flow in the foreground, while the upper part of fissure D is just beyond feeding flows that head off to the right (north). Fissure C is farther back and is supplying lava to the light-colored flow that cuts to the right across the middle of the top half of the photo. Fissure B starts at the farthest point of blue fume and feeds the flow that angles down to the left across the top half of the photo. Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the background at the top of the image, and the briefly active fissure A is the barely visible dark splotch on the near side of Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone.
Left. The material pushed out during the breach of the fissure C pond wall (center frame) continues to creep forward a day later as lava erupting from fissure C (just out of sight to the right) piles up behind it. Right. Fissure D is the most active fissure segment and is erupting lava from two discrete areas along its length. The upper part of fissure D (labeled D1 on the map) continues to build a lava pond and is sending lava flows coursing north. The lower part of fissure D (labeled D2 on the map) has refilled its pond that breached a few days ago. In this slightly off-kilter photo, the lower part of fissure D if supplying the flow in the foreground, while the upper part of fissure D is just beyond feeding flows that head off to the right (north). Fissure C is farther back and is supplying lava to the light-colored flow that cuts to the right across the middle of the top half of the photo. Fissure B starts at the farthest point of blue fume and feeds the flow that angles down to the left across the top half of the photo. Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the background at the top of the image, and the briefly active fissure A is the barely visible dark splotch on the near side of Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone.

23 July 2007

Active fissure, kipuka, and the perched lava pond

 View looking along the fissure from the lower perched lava pond (foreground) to Pu‘u ‘O‘o (background). The kipuka (pocket of vegetation) on the right edge of the photo is Pu‘u Kahauale‘a.
View looking along the fissure from the lower perched lava pond (foreground) to Pu‘u ‘O‘o (background). The kipuka (pocket of vegetation) on the right edge of the photo is Pu‘u Kahauale‘a.
View looking along the fissure from the lower perched lava pond (foreground) to Pu‘u ‘O‘o (background). The kipuka (pocket of vegetation) on the right edge of the photo is Pu‘u Kahauale‘a.
 Close-up of the edge of the lower lava pond with an HVO scientist standing at the base for scale. Note the pond overflow behind him.
HVO scientists returning from examining the edge of the perched lava pond. The pond difficult to walk over.
Left. Close-up of the edge of the lower lava pond with an HVO scientist standing at the base for scale. Note the pond overflow behind him. Right. HVO scientists returning from examining the edge of the perched lava pond. The pond difficult to walk over.
View of the largest perched lava pond fed by the July 21 fissures. The pond was estimated to be 12-15 m (40-50 feet) high. The trees in the distant are above the top of Royal Gardens subdivision.
Upper segment of the active fissure is still producing lava
Left.View of the largest perched lava pond fed by the July 21 fissures. The pond was estimated to be 12-15 m (40-50 feet) high. The trees in the distant are above the top of Royal Gardens subdivision. Right. Upper segment of the active fissure is still producing lava.

22 July 2007

Perched lava pond and lava from a drowned fissure

 Perched lava pond at the eastern end of the July 21 fissures.
Perched lava pond at the eastern end of the July 21 fissures.
Perched lava pond at the eastern end of the July 21 fissures.
 Lava issuing from a drowned fissure near Pu‘u Halulu.
Lava issuing from a drowned fissure near Pu‘u Halulu.
Lava issuing from a drowned fissure near Pu‘u Halulu.

21 July 2007

More channels

 One of the flow fronts advancing to the northeast and touching off a small fire at the edge of Pu‘u Kahauale‘a.
Channels carry lava away from lower fissures.
Left. One of the flow fronts advancing to the northeast and touching off a small fire at the edge of Pu‘u Kahauale‘a. Right. Channels carry lava away from lower fissures.
 Puka Nui pit (top) and MLK pit filled with lava before midnight, but were inactive today.
HVO scientists sample and make measurements at the edge of one of the channels.
Left. Puka Nui pit (top) and MLK pit filled with lava before midnight, but were inactive today. Right. HVO scientists sample and make measurements at the edge of one of the channels.
 Leading tip of the fissure (steaming area at bottom of photo) that erupted lava minutes after photo was taken.
Leading tip of the fissure (steaming area at bottom of photo) that erupted lava minutes after photo was taken.

21 July 2007 New Fissure eruption east of Pu‘u ‘O‘o Crater Press Release

Lava moves east from Pu‘u ‘O‘o

 Uppermost active fissure with lava flowing eastward in a channel.
Looking west toward Pu‘u ‘O‘o (top of photo) showing low spattering from fissure feeding lava channels.
Left. Uppermost active fissure with lava flowing eastward in a channel. Right. Looking west toward Pu‘u ‘O‘o (top of photo) showing low spattering from fissure feeding lava channels.
 Uppermost active channel flows over fissure.
Uppermost active channel flows over fissure.
Left. Uppermost active channel flows over fissure. Right. Uppermost active channel flows over fissure.
 Looking west along erupting fissure feeding lava flows
Closeup of spattering from one of the channels.
Left. Looking west along erupting fissure feeding lava flows. Right. Closeup of spattering from one of the channels.
 HVO scientists sample an active channel
West end of now inactive fissure on east flank of Pu‘u ‘O‘o. The eruption may have started here. Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater is in the upper left. Blue fume mark vents along the fissure.
Left. HVO scientists sample an active channel. Right. West end of now inactive fissure on east flank of Pu‘u ‘O‘o. The eruption may have started here. Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater is in the upper left. Blue fume mark vents along the fissure.
 Overlooking new lava flows from a point one-half mile east of Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Active flows are visible in the top middle of the photo from a long set of fissures.
Left. Overlooking new lava flows from a point one-half mile east of Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Active flows are visible in the top middle of the photo from a long set of fissures. Right.

19 July 2007

Activity at Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater and flank vents

 Lava continues to erupt at Pu`u `O`o. Looking west across the crater from the east spillway, the lighter colored lava in the center of the image is active lava erupting from the west vent (site of pronounced fuming) on the crater floor. In the background, the elevated pond filling the West Gap pit is within about 20 meters of the western rim of the pit. Overflows from the pond continue to occasionally overflow into Pu`u `O`o crater. The edge of Puka Nui pit can be seen in the background to the left.
The pond filling the West Gap pit is in the foreground in this view. The lava erupting from the west vent in the main crater can be seen beyond the West Gap lava on the left side of the photo. The Puka Nui pit is the long pit on the right cut off by the photo, and the MLK pit in to the right in the background. The small fuming area just above the center of the frame is a new vent that became active yesterday afternoon (July 18) and described below.
Left. Lava continues to erupt at Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Looking west across the crater from the east spillway, the lighter colored lava in the center of the image is active lava erupting from the west vent (site of pronounced fuming) on the crater floor. In the background, the elevated pond filling the West Gap pit is within about 20 meters of the western rim of the pit. Overflows from the pond continue to occasionally overflow into Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater. The edge of Puka Nui pit can be seen in the background to the left. Right. The pond filling the West Gap pit is in the foreground in this view. The lava erupting from the west vent in the main crater can be seen beyond the West Gap lava on the left side of the photo. The Puka Nui pit is the long pit on the right cut off by the photo, and the MLK pit in to the right in the background. The small fuming area just above the center of the frame is a new vent that became active yesterday afternoon (July 18) and described below.
 This vent, on the inner south wall of Pu`u `O`o cone, started erupting yesterday afternoon (July 18), and has begun to build a small spatter cone. This view also provides a nice perspective showing how the pond in the West Gap pit (in the background to the right) is elevated above the main Pu`u `O`o crater floor (continues out of sight to the right).
This is a close-up of the spattering vent described above.
Left. This vent, on the inner south wall of Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone, started erupting yesterday afternoon (July 18), and has begun to build a small spatter cone. This view also provides a nice perspective showing how the pond in the West Gap pit (in the background to the right) is elevated above the main Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater floor (continues out of sight to the right). Right. This is a close-up of the spattering vent described above.
 Lava began erupting in the Puka Nui area a few days ago and continues to feed a small lava pond in the Puka Nui pit. This pond is the obvious smooth-looking lava surface filling the lower right side of the image. The vent feeding the lava pond is the small, weakly fuming group of spatter cones just right of the center of the photo. The bluish fume near the top left of the photo is the spattering vent on the south wall of Pu`u `O`o cone described above.
The pond in Puka Nui was barely active when this photo, looking roughly northeast, was taken. The high walls of the main Pu`u `O`o crater can be seen in the background.
Left. Lava began erupting in the Puka Nui area a few days ago and continues to feed a small lava pond in the Puka Nui pit. This pond is the obvious smooth-looking lava surface filling the lower right side of the image. The vent feeding the lava pond is the small, weakly fuming group of spatter cones just right of the center of the photo. The bluish fume near the top left of the photo is the spattering vent on the south wall of Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone described above. Right. The pond in Puka Nui was barely active when this photo, looking roughly northeast, was taken. The high walls of the main Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater can be seen in the background.

16 July 2007

Activity at West Gap

 This view, looking east across West Gap pit and Pu`u `O`o crater, provides a closer view of the new lava pond in the West Gap. The small spatter cones just to the right of the lava pond were built over the weekend. By Monday, lava was only seen upwelling at the edge of the lava pond near the base of the closer cone. The effusion point is at the right edge of the shinier, more silvery pad of lava visible in this photo. The larger spatter cone, partly hidden by fume, is probably about 15 feet high.
The weather cleared briefly on Monday afternoon and provided a decent view looking west at Pu`u `O`o crater. The lava pond on the crater floor has stagnated and subsided, revealing the levee walls built up last week. Last week's dominant eastern vent has become mostly inactive, while the western vent continues to episodically produce small lava flows. The vent on the south wall of West Gap pit, which became active on Friday the 13th, remains active. The lava pond that subsequently filled the West Gap pit is visible on the far side of the crater to the right where it is spilling into the main Pu`u `O`o crater.
Left. This view, looking east across West Gap pit and Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater, provides a closer view of the new lava pond in the West Gap. The small spatter cones just to the right of the lava pond were built over the weekend. By Monday, lava was only seen upwelling at the edge of the lava pond near the base of the closer cone. The effusion point is at the right edge of the shinier, more silvery pad of lava visible in this photo. The larger spatter cone, partly hidden by fume, is probably about 15 feet high. Right. The weather cleared briefly on Monday afternoon and provided a decent view looking west at Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater. The lava pond on the crater floor has stagnated and subsided, revealing the levee walls built up last week. Last week's dominant eastern vent has become mostly inactive, while the western vent continues to episodically produce small lava flows. The vent on the south wall of West Gap pit, which became active on Friday the 13th, remains active. The lava pond that subsequently filled the West Gap pit is visible on the far side of the crater to the right where it is spilling into the main Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater.

15 July 2007

Active lava lake and the new vent at Pu‘u ‘O‘o

 aerial view of Pu‘u ‘O‘o  on the morning of July 13, 2007, showing the active lava lake, the east and west vent, surrounded by remnants of the collapsed crater floor.
 aerial view of new vent that started around 4 pm on July 13, 2007 in West Gap pit.
Left. Aerial view of Pu‘u ‘O‘o on the morning of July 13, 2007, showing the active lava lake, the east and west vent, surrounded by remnants of the collapsed crater floor. Right. Aerial view of new vent that started around 4 pm on July 13, 2007 in West Gap pit.

5 July 2007

Aerial tour around Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone

 Looking to the east through the collapsed West Gap of Pu`u `O`o, the silver crust of the active lava pond is visible through the fume.
 Pu`u `O`o from the east. The new lava is difficult to see from this angle because of the persistent fume that rises from the east rim of the crater.
Left. Looking to the east through the collapsed West Gap of Pu‘u ‘O‘o, the silver crust of the active lava pond is visible through the fume. Right. Pu‘u ‘O‘o from the east. The new lava is difficult to see from this angle because of the persistent fume that rises from the east rim of the crater.
 View from the southwest, with the collapse pits of Puka Nui (left) and MLK (right) in the foreground.
 The two active vents are visible in this view—a vent with a small spatter cone to the left, which is feeding the larger of the two active ponds, and a vent on the side of the northeast crater wall that feeds a smaller pond in the deepest part of the crater.
Left. View from the southwest, with the collapse pits of Puka Nui (left) and MLK (right) in the foreground. Right. Looking into the crater over the south rim. The two active vents are visible in this view—a vent with a small spatter cone to the left, which is feeding the larger of the two active ponds, and a vent on the side of the northeast crater wall that feeds a smaller pond in the deepest part of the crater. These vents are near or at the locations of the pre-collapse Beehive and East Pond vents.

Lava falls at east end of crater

 The lava falls at the east end of the crater is feeding the smaller of the two ponds.
 Telephoto view of the lava falls.
Left. The lava falls at the east end of the crater is feeding the smaller of the two ponds. The larger and higher pond (its edge is visible to the left) is intermittently draining into the eastern pond. Note person with gas-sensing instrument on the crater rim at the extreme right. Right. Telephoto view of the lava falls.

Lava pond fills center of crater

 View of overturning lava pond from the north rim of the crater.
 The Beehive vent is topped by a small spatter cone. Beyond the vent, the crust of the pond is overturning, revealing the molten interior.
Left. View of overturning lava pond from the north rim of the crater. Right. The Beehive vent is topped by a small spatter cone. Beyond the vent, the crust of the pond is overturning, revealing the molten interior.

4 July 2007

Circulating lava pond

 View of a circulating lava pond filling the collapsed floor of Pu`u `O`o crater, as captured by the webcam at 4:42 am July 4, 2007.
View of a circulating lava pond filling the collapsed floor of Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater, as captured by the webcam at 4:42 am July 4, 2007.

2 July 2007 Lava returns to Pu‘u ‘O‘o Crater Press Release

A glimpse of lava at Pu‘u ‘O‘o

 A brief glimpse of a lava flow on the collapsed floor of Pu`u `O`o crater.
 A brief glimpse of a lava flow on the collapsed floor of Pu`u `O`o crater.
A brief glimpse of a lava flow on the collapsed floor of Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 1 Aug 2007 (pnf)