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Kilauea

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Images and Chronology
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21 June 2007

Pu?u ?O?o flow field quietly cools

A single skylight on the Petunia lava tube is still incandescent, but no lava is moving through the tube, and the persistent trickle of lava entering the ocean at Poupou has finally shut down.
The interior of the Kiln hornito at the upper end of the PKK lava tube was dull red yesterday but is dark today.
Left. A single skylight on the Petunia lava tube is still incandescent, but no lava is moving through the tube, and the persistent trickle of lava entering the ocean at Poupou has finally shut down. Right. The interior of the Kiln hornito at the upper end of the PKK lava tube was dull red yesterday but is dark today.

Pu?u ?O?o crater rim is wreathed with new cracks

Aerial view of web cam and heat sensing instruments on the north rim of Pu?u ?O?o crater.  Most of the large cracks in this view have existed for years, but many of them widened significantly in the last few days.
Geologist approaches the north rim warily, following the trace of newly widened ground cracks.
Left. Aerial view of web cam and heat sensing instruments on the north rim of Pu?u ?O?o crater. Most of the large cracks in this view have existed for years, but many of them widened significantly in the last few days. Right. Geologist approaches the north rim warily, following the trace of newly widened ground cracks.
Southwest flank of cone is cut by large cracks where the collapse of the Puka Nui and MLK vents undermined the flank.  Footpath across the cone is offset by the large cracks near center of view.
Geologist changes data card in time-lapse camera perched on the east rim of the crater. Jagged edge is new since June 18.
Left. Southwest flank of cone is cut by large cracks where the collapse of the Puka Nui and MLK vents undermined the flank. Footpath across the cone is offset by the large cracks near center of view. Right. Geologist changes data card in time-lapse camera perched on the east rim of the crater. Jagged edge is new since June 18.

June 19 eruptive fissure

The June 19 eruptive fissure at the northeast base of Kane Nui o Hamo continues to degas.  The discoloration of the forest is partly due to heat and partly to the effects of sulfurous gases.
The June 19 eruptive fissure at the northeast base of Kane Nui o Hamo continues to degas.  The discoloration of the forest is partly due to heat and partly to the effects of sulfurous gases.
The June 19 eruptive fissure at the northeast base of Kane Nui o Hamo continues to degas. The discoloration of the forest is partly due to heat and partly to the effects of sulfurous gases.
Telephoto view into the forest of spatter blob that landed squarely on top of a tree fern. Spatter covers the surrounding forest floor.
Large ohia trees litter the new lava flows.
Left. Telephoto view into the forest of spatter blob that landed squarely on top of a tree fern. Spatter covers the surrounding forest floor. Right. Large ohia trees litter the new lava flows.

20 June 2007 Episode 56 Map - June 20, 2007
Episode 56 Map (with seismicity) - June 20, 2007

From a distance Pu?u ?O?o looks unchanged

Weather and visibility at Pu`u `O`o cone improved this afternoon.  Flying downrift from the summit of Kilauea, the cone looks unchanged.
Weather and visibility at Pu`u `O`o cone improved this afternoon.  Flying downrift from the summit of Kilauea, the cone looks unchanged.
Weather and visibility at Pu?u ?O?o cone improved this afternoon. Flying downrift from the summit of Kilauea, the cone looks unchanged.

But close inspection reveals more collapse

Views from the northwest reveal that the cone has sprouted rabbit ears, formed by continued collapse of the West Gap pit (right foreground) and Puka Nui (right background).
Views from the northwest reveal that the cone has sprouted rabbit ears, formed by continued collapse of the West Gap pit (right foreground) and Puka Nui (right background).
Views from the northwest reveal that the cone has sprouted rabbit ears, formed by continued collapse of the West Gap pit (right foreground) and Puka Nui (right background).
On the southwest side of the cone, the MLK vent has deepened.  A time-lapse camera and seismic instrumentation, visible on the steep south flank of the cone, are still intact.
The east end of the crater, former home of the East Pond Vent, is still obscured by steam.
Left. On the southwest side of the cone, the MLK vent has deepened. A time-lapse camera and seismic instrumentation, visible on the steep south flank of the cone, are still intact. Right. The east end of the crater, former home of the East Pond Vent, is still obscured by steam.

GPS shows continuing extension across the rift zone

HVO geophysicist downloads GPS instrument near Pu`u `O`o.
The newly steaming crack at the uprift edge of Kane Nui o Hamo continues to emit a potent mix of steam and volcanic gas.  The eruptive fissure of June 19 is fuming in the distance, on the downrift side of Kane Nui o Hamo.  The edge of Makaopuhi Crater is at right.
Left. HVO geophysicist downloads GPS instrument near Pu?u ?O?o. Right. The newly steaming crack at the uprift edge of Kane Nui o Hamo continues to emit a potent mix of steam and volcanic gas. The eruptive fissure of June 19 is fuming in the distance, on the downrift side of Kane Nui o Hamo. The edge of Makaopuhi Crater is at right.

Part of June 19 eruptive fissure still fuming

iew from downrift shows June 19 eruptive fissure in foreground and this morning?s steaming crack in the background.  In between, two puffs of steam mark the location of the crack that was vigorously steaming on June 19.
Pahoehoe flow is visible through the scorched trees along the June 19 eruptive vent.
Left. View from downrift shows June 19 eruptive fissure in foreground and this morning?s steaming crack in the background. In between, two puffs of steam mark the location of the crack that was vigorously steaming on June 19. Right. Pahoehoe flow is visible through the scorched trees along the June 19 eruptive vent.

Lava tube from Pu?u ?O?o still draining

At the Poupou ocean entry, a single stream of lava continued to trickle into the surf.
Skylight in the roof of the lava tube leading to the ocean entry was mostly dark.  Cooling lava on the floor of the tube showed only a few glowing cracks, indicating that the trickle of lava at the ocean is coming from the broad area of inflated flows on the coastal plain.
Visibility at Pu?u ?O?o cone was nil this morning, due to rain and steam. Left. At the Poupou ocean entry, a single stream of lava continued to trickle into the surf. Right. Skylight in the roof of the lava tube leading to the ocean entry was mostly dark. Cooling lava on the floor of the tube showed only a few glowing cracks, indicating that the trickle of lava at the ocean is coming from the broad area of inflated flows on the coastal plain.

Newly steaming cracks near Kane Nui o Hamo

Photo taken June 19 looking downrift toward the green slope of Kane Nui o Hamo.  In the foreground, fresh ground cracks traverse Mauna Ulu lava flows. These cracks were mapped on June 18. In the distance, steam rises from a new crack on the north flank of Kane Nui o Hamo.
Today: Similar view, with the edge of Makaopuhi Crater visible to the right of Kane Nui o Hamo.  Steam and volcanic fume are now rising from the cracks in Mauna Ulu flows.
Left. Yesterday: Photo taken June 19 looking downrift toward the green slope of Kane Nui o Hamo. In the foreground, fresh ground cracks traverse Mauna Ulu lava flows. These cracks were mapped on June 18 (see http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/maps.html). In the distance, steam rises from a new crack on the north flank of Kane Nui o Hamo. Right. Today: Similar view, with the edge of Makaopuhi Crater visible to the right of Kane Nui o Hamo. Steam and volcanic fume are now rising from the cracks in Mauna Ulu flows.

19 June 2007 New Lava outbreak Press Release
Episode 56 Map

More collapse at Pu?u ?O?o

Repeated collapse has carved a fresh face on the south wall of the crater, revealing black and red layers of cinder and agglutinated spatter deposited by high lava fountains early in this eruption.  At mid-skyline, an antennae for relaying seismic data is now perched precariously close to the edge.
The northwest shoulder of the cone shows a series of new cracks that have sliced through the cone as the west gap pit, out of view to the right, continues to widen.  Horizontal lines on the steep, cinder-covered cone are foot paths.
Poor visibility due to thick steam allowed only a few glimpses into the crater today. Left. Repeated collapse has carved a fresh face on the south wall of the crater, revealing black and red layers of cinder and agglutinated spatter deposited by high lava fountains early in this eruption. At mid-skyline, an antennae for relaying seismic data is now perched precariously close to the edge. Right. The northwest shoulder of the cone shows a series of new cracks that have sliced through the cone as the west gap pit, out of view to the right, continues to widen. Horizontal lines on the steep, cinder-covered cone are foot paths.

Last Gasp at the Ocean Entry

The only lava visible from Pu?u ?O?o to the sea is a single stream entering the water at the Poupou entry.  This lava probably represents the final draining of the Campout tube.
The only lava visible from Pu?u ?O?o to the sea is a single stream entering the water at the Poupou entry.  This lava probably represents the final draining of the Campout tube.
The only lava visible from Pu?u ?O?o to the sea is a single stream entering the water at the Poupou entry. This lava probably represents the final draining of the Campout tube.

New eruptive fissure

View from Napau Crater (left foreground) looking uprift to the new eruptive fissure at the northeast base of Kane Nui o Hamo.  A short distance farther is a new steaming crack.  Mauna Ulu, Pu`u Hululu, and Mauna Loa are visible in the background.
Fresh pahoehoe is visible through the canopy of the rain forest.
Left. View from Napau Crater (left foreground) looking uprift to the new eruptive fissure at the northeast base of Kane Nui o Hamo. A short distance farther is a new steaming crack. Mauna Ulu, Pu`u Hululu, and Mauna Loa are visible in the background. Right. Fresh pahoehoe is visible through the canopy of the rain forest.
Steam, volcanic fume, and wood smoke rise from the forest near the new fissure.  The forest is so wet that only the vegetation inundated by the flows burned.
Steam, volcanic fume, and wood smoke rise from the forest near the new fissure.  The forest is so wet that only the vegetation inundated by the flows burned.
Steam, volcanic fume, and wood smoke rise from the forest near the new fissure. The forest is so wet that only the vegetation inundated by the flows burned.

New lava flow near fissure

Thin pahoehoe flows extended only about 50 meters from the fissure, toppling tree ferns and a few ohia trees.  The fissure had stopped erupting by the time these photos were taken, shortly after 8:00 A.M., on June 19.
Flames from overrun vegetation flicker above the surface of the new pahoehoe flow.
Left. Thin pahoehoe flows extended only about 50 meters from the fissure, toppling tree ferns and a few ohia trees. The fissure had stopped erupting by the time these photos were taken, shortly after 8:00 A.M., on June 19. Right. Flames from overrun vegetation flicker above the surface of the new pahoehoe flow.

Steam and gas from a fissure and a crack

Steam and gas from a fissure (nearest) and a crack (farthest) that opened up some time last night (June 18 or 19). A small pad of new but cooling lava had issued from the fissure. Mauna Loa is in the far background and Mauna Ulu is in the near background.
Steam and gas from a fissure (nearest) and a crack (farthest) that opened up some time last night (June 18 or 19). A small pad of new but cooling lava had issued from the fissure. Mauna Loa is in the far background and Mauna Ulu is in the near background.
Steam and gas from a fissure (nearest) and a crack (farthest) that opened up some time last night (June 18 or 19). A small pad of new but cooling lava had issued from the fissure. Mauna Loa is in the far background and Mauna Ulu is in the near background.

18 June 2007 Earthquake Swarm Press Release

Pu?u ?O?o crater before and after Swarm

Pu`u `O`o before the intrusion, June 01, 2007.
Pu`u `O`o after the intrusion, June 18, 2007.
Left. Before picture of Pu?u ?O?o crater from the northeast. Within the crater, the order of the vents, from foreground to background, is: East Pond vent, two January vent spatter cones, South Wall Complex and Drainhole vents. Right. After picture of Pu?u ?O?o crater from the northeast. Note the 20 m+ drop in the crater floor and slumping of the south wall. Steam obscures the collpase of the January spatter cones and East Pond vent in the foreground.

Pu?u ?O?o crater

Pu`u `O`o vent from east
Pu`u `O`o vent from northeast
Left. Pu?u ?O?o vent from east. Right. Pu?u ?O?o vent from northeast.
Pu`u `O`o vent from south.
South Wall Complex, inside Pu`u `O`o crater, from north
Left. Pu?u ?O?o vent from south. Right. South Wall Complex, inside Pu?u ?O?o crater, from north.

Poupou ocean entry

Poupou ocean entry
Poupou ocean entry

Cracks across Chain of Craters Road

Cracks across Chain of Craters Road near Mauna Ulu, June 17.
Cracks in Chain of Craters Road near Mauna Ulu turnoff. More cracking was observed to the east between Mauna Ulu and Kane Nui o Hamo. Father's Day, June 17.

13 June 2007

Pu?u ?O?o crater and Petunia flow

The East Pond vent, on the eastern side of the Pu?u ?O?o crater, has hosted a small lava pond for the last couple of years.
 A new skylight near the breakout point of the flow provides the first look of the 3-meter-wide lava stream inside the tube.
Left. The East Pond vent, on the eastern side of the Pu?u ?O?o crater, has hosted a small lava pond for the last couple of years. Sloshing and weak spattering on the pond surface frequently ejects small pieces of spatter and Pele?s tears. The small wooden boxes, seen in this photo on the edge of the vent just below the area of strongest spattering, are used to collect these stray pieces of lava. Chemical analyses of the spatter and tears allows us to study the evolution of the lava to better understand the eruption. Right. The Petunia flow, which began in mid-May, continues to push toward the southeast. The upper part of the lava flow has already evolved into a well-developed lava tube that easily transports lava down-slope to feed the terminus of the lengthening flow. A new skylight near the breakout point of the flow provides the first look of the 3-meter-wide lava stream inside the tube.

Lava toes and old roads

This photo shows off the fascinating surface texture of a barely active toe of lava.
This photo shows one of the subdivision streets, its bottom buried by lava, disappearing up-slope into the rain.
Left. While pictures showing the spectacular side of volcanic eruptions are what generally captures the imagination, the little details can often be just as interesting. This photo shows off the fascinating surface texture of a barely active toe of lava. Right. Large `a`a flows invaded the upper reaches of the Royal Gardens subdivision between 1983 and 1986. Since that time, pahoehoe flows have surrounded the subdivision and cut off access by road. Earlier this year, lava from the Campout flow buried the last remnants of Royal Gardens at the base of the pali. This photo shows one of the subdivision streets, its bottom buried by lava, disappearing up-slope into the rain.

1 June 2007

Pu?u ?O?o crater and Petunia flow

looking approximately south, the East Pond vent is emitting bluish-colored fume in the foreground
the lighter, silvery-colored Petunia flow can be seen making its way along the east margin of the Campout flow. The terminus of the flow is visible in the lower right-hand corner of the photo.
Left. Clear skies lately have allowed spectacular aerial views of Pu?u ?O?o. In this photo, looking approximately south, the East Pond vent is emitting bluish-colored fume in the foreground. Just behind and slightly to the right, the January vent is fuming profusely. The South Wall subsidence feature, which encompasses South Wall complex, Drainhole vent, Beehive vent, and Dave?s pit, is lightly fuming behind the January vent. Beyond Pu?u ?O?o, in the background, faint fume traces the PKK lava tube down-slope from the PKK vent on the southwest flank of Pu?u ?O?o. Right. In mid-May, lava broke out from an old skylight, called the Petunia skylight, on the upper part of the PKK lava tube. This lava flow, which we are calling the Petunia flow, continues to be active and has sent lava about 2 km down-slope. In this photo, the lighter, silvery-colored Petunia flow can be seen making its way along the east margin of the Campout flow. The terminus of the flow is visible in the lower right-hand corner of the photo.

Poupou ocean entry

The Poupou entry, its plume seen in the distance, has been active since May 16. It is being fed through a lava tube that passes below the Royal gardens subdivision, seen at the bottom of the photo, before turning southward toward the ocean
This photo, obviously, is looking at the Poupou entry from the opposite direction of the previous photo.
Left. The Poupou entry, its plume seen in the distance, has been active since May 16. It is being fed through a lava tube that passes below the Royal gardens subdivision, seen at the bottom of the photo, before turning southward toward the ocean. Right. This photo, obviously, is looking at the Poupou entry from the opposite direction of the previous photo. The Poupou entry has not yet built much of a delta. The amount of lava entering the water there is less than that seen at other recent ocean entries. The reason is likely because part of the volume of erupted lava is being robbed by the Petunia flow, near Pu?u ?O?o, and by surface breakouts inland from the ocean entry.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 22 June 2007 (pnf)