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Kilauea

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Images and Chronology
Looking for images you could swear you saw here but can't find now? Check Image Archive

30 November 2007

"Thanksgiving Eve" breakout

The terminus of the Thanksgiving Eve flow, stagnant since last week, can be seen reaching some old lava tube skylights at the bottom right side of the photo. The breakout source is at the bluish fume just of the center of the photo. Most of the lava is just piling up within several hundred meters (yards) of the vent.
Closer view of the Thanksgiving Eve flow. The vast majority of the erupted lava is building up the area where the incandescent streams are visible in the center of the photo.
Left.The terminus of the "Thanksgiving Eve" flow, stagnant since last week, can be seen reaching some old lava tube skylights at the bottom right side of the photo. The breakout source is at the bluish fume just of the center of the photo. Most of the lava is just piling up within several hundred meters (yards) of the vent.Right.Closer view of the "Thanksgiving Eve" flow. The vast majority of the erupted lava is building up the area where the incandescent streams are visible in the center of the photo.
The perched channel now appears to be very nearly, if not completely, abandoned, and the crusted surface of the pools has dropped back down after having filled to overflowing early in the week. One tiny active pad of lava was seen on the surface of the first pool, in the background. The Thankgiving Eve flow is the slightly lighter colored lava that starts at the fume source at top center and heads off toward top left. Pu`u `O`o is at top right.
South winds provided a nice view into the west side of Pu`u `O`o crater. Heavy degassing typically leaves the crater completely obscured.
Left.The perched channel now appears to be very nearly, if not completely, abandoned, and the crusted surface of the pools has dropped back down after having filled to overflowing early in the week. One tiny active pad of lava was seen on the surface of the first pool, in the background. The "Thankgiving Eve" flow is the slightly lighter colored lava that starts at the fume source at top center and heads off toward top left. Pu`u `O`o is at top right.Right.South winds provided a nice view into the west side of Pu`u `O`o crater. Heavy degassing typically leaves the crater completely obscured.

23 November 2007

"Thanksgiving Eve" breakout

View looking northwest at the Thanksgiving Eve breakout. The terminus of the flow, now stagnant, are the darker gray colored fingers cutting from left to right just below center frame. Pu`u `O`o is at the upper left. The perched channel starts just below the forested kipuka in the distance and extends off to the right.
Closer view of the Thanksgiving Eve breakout showing the active part of the flow, which was only reaching about 900 meters from the breakout point at fissure D.
Left.View looking northwest at the "Thanksgiving Eve" breakout. The terminus of the flow, now stagnant, are the darker gray colored fingers cutting from left to right just below center frame. Pu`u `O`o is at the upper left. The perched channel starts just below the forested kipuka in the distance and extends off to the right.Right.Closer view of the "Thanksgiving Eve" breakout showing the active part of the flow, which was only reaching about 900 meters from the breakout point at fissure D.
An even closer view of the new breakout showing the active lava stream. The lower flank of Pu`u Kahauale`a, northwest of the breakout point, is in the background.
	View of the four partly drained pools along the perched lava channel. Lava is still being supplied to the channel, feeding small seeps to the northwest (to the left) of the third pool.
Left.An even closer view of the new breakout showing the active lava stream. The lower flank of Pu`u Kahauale`a, northwest of the breakout point, is in the background.Right.View of the four partly drained pools along the perched lava channel. Lava is still being supplied to the channel, feeding small seeps to the northwest (to the left) of the third pool.
View from the northwest edge of the perched lava channel looking toward the upper end of the first pool. At the time of this photo, the surface of the lava pool was crusted and stationary. Lava is fed into the perched channel at the base of the wall in the background. The channel rim is about 6 meters (20 ft) above the lava surface, and the channel is about 50 meters (164 ft) across.
	The crusted surface of the lava channel was periodically overturning-a process where plates of cooled crust sink beneath the surface and are replaced by hot, fresh lava. In this photo, a long slice of cooled crust a few inches thick can be seen sliding down into the pooled lava, and new, frothy lava is welling up to fill the void.
Left.View from the northwest edge of the perched lava channel looking toward the upper end of the first pool. At the time of this photo, the surface of the lava pool was crusted and stationary. Lava is fed into the perched channel at the base of the wall in the background. The channel rim is about 6 meters (20 ft) above the lava surface, and the channel is about 50 meters (164 ft) across.Right.The crusted surface of the lava channel was periodically overturning-a process where plates of cooled crust sink beneath the surface and are replaced by hot, fresh lava. In this photo, a long slice of cooled crust a few inches thick can be seen sliding down into the pooled lava, and new, frothy lava is welling up to fill the void.

21 November 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

View looking southeast toward the new breakout point on fissure D. Lava erupting from the fissure feeds lava flows heading in opposite directions. The flow heading northwest, in the foreground, has not advanced much beyond what seen in the photo---only about 200-300 meters. The flow heading toward the southeast---into the distance in this photo---is the dominant flow as had make it about 1 kilometer by the time this photo was taken at about 4:45 pm.
View looking northwest at the terminus of the southeasterly-directed flow. The effusion point is on the skyline in the distance, though it is difficult to see with the bad, late afternoon back-lighting.
Left.View looking southeast toward the new breakout point on fissure D. Lava erupting from the fissure feeds lava flows heading in opposite directions. The flow heading northwest, in the foreground, has not advanced much beyond what seen in the photo---only about 200-300 meters. The flow heading toward the southeast---into the distance in this photo---is the dominant flow as had make it about 1 kilometer by the time this photo was taken at about 4:45 pm.Right. View looking northwest at the terminus of the southeasterly-directed flow. The effusion point is on the skyline in the distance, though it is difficult to see with the bad, late afternoon back-lighting.
View looking northeast across the new breakout point with the partly-drained pool 1 of the perched channel beyond. The deep red incandescence in the distance is the now-exposed opening beneath the bridge separating the first and second pools of the perched channel.
View to the southwest looking at the upper end of pool 1 of the perched channel with the new breakout just beyond. The level of the lava in the first pool of the perched channel has dropped 10 meters or so. The channel continues to receive some lava, though the supply is greatly diminished.
Left.View looking northeast across the new breakout point with the partly-drained pool 1 of the perched channel beyond. The deep red incandescence in the distance is the now-exposed opening beneath the bridge separating the first and second pools of the perched channel.Right.View to the southwest looking at the upper end of pool 1 of the perched channel with the new breakout just beyond. The level of the lava in the first pool of the perched channel has dropped 10 meters or so. The channel continues to receive some lava, though the supply is greatly diminished.

15 November 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Looking west toward Pu`u `O`o fuming in the background. The various pahoehoe flows issued by the east tube are in smoking in the foreground and the channel end is fuming in the middle ground.
`A`a flow being squeezed out of an uplifted area northeast of the channel end.
Left.Looking west toward Pu`u `O`o fuming in the background. The various pahoehoe flows issued by the east tube are in smoking in the foreground and the channel end is fuming in the middle ground.Right. `A`a flow being squeezed out of an uplifted area northeast of the channel end.
View of a skylight on the east tube up near the channel end (silver surface near the top of the photo, flow is to right in channel). The skylight being empty and the channel being full when this photo was taken (10:51 am) suggests that the east tube was blocked and no lava was flowing into it form the channel.
`View of the same skylight at 3:15 pm after the tube blockage had been cleared and lava was flowing back through.
Left.View of a skylight on the east tube up near the channel end (silver surface near the top of the photo, flow is to right in channel). The skylight being empty and the channel being full when this photo was taken (10:51 am) suggests that the east tube was blocked and no lava was flowing into it form the channel.Right. View of the same skylight at 3:15 pm after the tube blockage had been cleared and lava was flowing back through.
About the same time that previous photo was taken, the lava level in the channel had dropped and lava was again pouring into the east tube inlet.
Aerial view of entire channel, bridges and all, flowing left to right.
Left.About the same time that previous photo was taken, the lava level in the channel had dropped and lava was again pouring into the east tube inlet.Right. Aerial view of entire channel, bridges and all, flowing left to right.

13 November 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

East tube inlet in south rim of perched channel is in lower right of this photo and smoke rising from several advancing pahoehoe flows is visible in the distance. The view is generally to the southeast and Kalalua cone is visible in the right side of the photo. Pu`u Kia`I is also visible in the photo although it is partially obscured by the smoke from the breakouts.
Closeup of the tube inlet in the south rim of the channel.
Left.East tube inlet in south rim of perched channel is in lower right of this photo and smoke rising from several advancing pahoehoe flows is visible in the distance. The view is generally to the southeast and Kalalua cone is visible in the right side of the photo. Pu`u Kia`I is also visible in the photo although it is partially obscured by the smoke from the breakouts.Right. Closeup of the tube inlet in the south rim of the channel.
Spattering against the south rim of the channel near the vent.
Closeup of the spattering.
Left.Spattering against the south rim of the channel near the vent.Right. Closeup of the spattering.

9 November 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Pahoehoe lobe from east tube bursting its seams.
	pahoehoe toe flowing into hole.
Left.Pahoehoe lobe from east tube bursting its seams.Right. Pahoehoe toe flowing into hole.
Channel section nearest the vent in which a couple of spattering events were seen. Some of the spatter was thrown 8-10 m (25-30 ft) high.
closeup of one of the spattering events from the channel edge. These may accompany an overturn of the crust growing on the channel
Left.Channel section nearest the vent in which a couple of spattering events were seen. Some of the spatter was thrown 8-10 m (25-30 ft) high. Right. Closeup of one of the spattering events from the channel edge. These may accompany an overturn of the crust growing on the channel.
Channel section farthest from the vent showing the east tube inlet (lower right). The crust on the rest of the channel section displays some very regular patterns.
Pahoehoe lobes issuing from the east tube advanced eastward in the vicinity of Pu`u Kia`i (peeking up out of the smoke).
Left. Channel section farthest from the vent showing the east tube inlet (lower right). The crust on the rest of the channel section displays some very regular patterns.Right. Pahoehoe lobes issuing from the east tube advanced eastward in the vicinity of Pu`u Kia`i (peeking up out of the smoke).

4 November 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Low-angle photo looking northwest of the first 3 channel segments (the three nearest the vent)  separated by bridges. The different levels achieved by each segment can be seen at this angle, each level drops to the next lowest in the direction of flow (northward).
	Seep-fed channelized `a`a flow on the south side of the channel. Note the slightly different levels for channel segments 3 and 4 (numbered north from vent).
Left. Low-angle photo looking northwest of the first 3 channel segments (the three nearest the vent) separated by bridges. The different levels achieved by each segment can be seen at this angle, each level drops to the next lowest in the direction of flow (northward). Right.Seep-fed channelized `a`a flow on the south side of the channel. Note the slightly different levels for channel segments 3 and 4 (numbered north from vent).
Looking south from actively oozing north-tube flows to channel. Pu`u `O`o is the high horizon point barely visible through mist.
	Looking south at easternmost activity from east-going tube. Pu`u Kia`i is the cone in the background
Left.Looking south from actively oozing north-tube flows to channel. Pu`u `O`o is the high horizon point barely visible through mist. Right. Looking south at easternmost activity from east-going tube. Pu`u Kia`i is the cone in the background.

2 November 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Pahoehoe flow advancing from the southern margin of the flow field around the 1977 channel that starts from Pu`u Kia`I (low tan cone at head of the tan channel). Pu`u `O`o is in the upper left corner of the photo.
	Overflows on both sides of the channel.
Left. Pahoehoe flow advancing from the southern margin of the flow field around the 1977 channel that starts from Pu`u Kia`I (low tan cone at head of the tan channel). Pu`u `O`o is in the upper left corner of the photo. Right. Overflows on both sides of the channel.
Overflows on south side of the channel with two skylights over the lava tube inlet to right. This tube supplied lava to the pahoehoe flow in photo 1084.
	A small lava stream flowing over one of the bridges spanning the channel and separating it into ponds. Lava is also flowing below the bridge.
Left. Overflows on south side of the channel with two skylights over the lava tube inlet to right. This tube supplied lava to the pahoehoe flow in photo 1084.Right. A small lava stream flowing over one of the bridges spanning the channel and separating it into ponds. Lava is also flowing below the bridge.
Part of the channel crusting over with a v-shaped opening pointing upstream. The crusting-over process usually starts at the upstream end, the crust grows downstream for a considerable distance, then the crust founders and sinks opening the channel to crusting over again.
Vent end of the channel demonstrating its perched nature.
Left. Part of the channel crusting over with a v-shaped opening pointing upstream. The crusting-over process usually starts at the upstream end, the crust grows downstream for a considerable distance, then the crust founders and sinks opening the channel to crusting over again.Right. Vent end of the channel demonstrating its perched nature.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 30 Nov 2007 (pnf)