USGS
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
yellow horizontal separator line

skip past main content navigational bar Kilauea
bullet - no meaningEruption
spacerSummary

bullet - no meaningHazards
bullet - no meaningHistory
bullet - no meaningPu`u `O`o
spacerPanorama

yellow horizontal separator line

Mauna Loa

yellow horizontal separator line

Earthquakes

yellow horizontal separator line

Other Volcanoes

yellow horizontal separator line

Volcanic Hazards

yellow horizontal separator line

About HVO  

yellow horizontal separator line

Kilauea

Note: Check Photo Glossary or a good dictionary for any terms unfamiliar to you.

Images and Chronology
Looking for images you could swear you saw here but can't find now? Check Image Archive

31 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Aerial view of nearly the entire July 21 eruption site. Fissure B, dead for months, extended from the lower left side of the image up to the bare cinder cone at center frame (Pu`u Halulu). Fissure C was just beyond fissure B, directly above Pu`u Halulu in this image. Fissure D, the active fissure, was beyond fissure C and is the fume source also directly above Pu`u Halulu. The smooth surface of the open lava channel, in the photo, extends up and to the left from fissure D, with a few fume sources apparent near its end. As of Wednesday, October 31, the most active lava flow was moving southeast from the end of the channel onto lava erupted in 1977. The terminus of this flow is the smoke visible near the upper right side of the image.
Aerial view looking west at the end of the active flows moving to the southeast. The flow front is about 3.5 km (2.2 miles) from the end of the lava channel. Pu`u `O`o can be seen fuming near top left, and Mauna Loa is the huge hump at top right.
Left. Aerial view of nearly the entire July 21 eruption site. Fissure B, dead for months, extended from the lower left side of the image up to the bare cinder cone at center frame (Pu`u Halulu). Fissure C was just beyond fissure B, directly above Pu`u Halulu in this image. Fissure D, the active fissure, was beyond fissure C and is the fume source also directly above Pu`u Halulu. The smooth surface of the open lava channel, in the photo, extends up and to the left from fissure D, with a few fume sources apparent near its end. As of Wednesday, October 31, the most active lava flow was moving southeast from the end of the channel onto lava erupted in 1977. The terminus of this flow is the smoke visible near the upper right side of the image.Right. Aerial view looking west at the end of the active flows moving to the southeast. The flow front is about 3.5 km (2.2 miles) from the end of the lava channel. Pu`u `O`o can be seen fuming near top left, and Mauna Loa is the huge hump at top right.
The two bright orange dots at the center of this image are skylights at the upper end of a lava tube being fed by lava draining from the southeast side of the channel. This tube is probably the source of the lava flow moving to the southeast. The thin, bright orange lines near the right side of the image are where lava drains into another tube that is carrying lava a short distance to the north.
View to the southwest looking upstream from the end of the channel (lower right) to the head of the channel at fissure D (heavy fume in distance).
Left. The two bright orange dots at the center of this image are skylights at the upper end of a lava tube being fed by lava draining from the southeast side of the channel. This tube is probably the source of the lava flow moving to the southeast. The thin, bright orange lines near the right side of the image are where lava drains into another tube that is carrying lava a short distance to the north.Right.View to the southwest looking upstream from the end of the channel (lower right) to the head of the channel at fissure D (heavy fume in distance).
View looking northeast down the length of the channel. The fissure D vent is the fume near lower left. In this photo, the upper 100 meters (330 ft) or so of the channel is covered by a stationary crust. In the Webcam, this crust can be seen growing downstream, then periodically breaking apart and getting rafted away by the lava channel only to repeat the process again.
When the level of the lava in the lava channel is high, as it has been since mid-October, the narrow constrictions in the lava channel often get covered by crusted lava to form bridges. Floating rafts of crust carried by the lava stream get piled up behind the bridges, impounding the lava, and causing the upstream section of the lava channel to become elevated above the downstream section of the channel. This image shows the bridge over the bottleneck between the first and second sections, or pools, of the lava channel. The elevation difference between the two pools is apparent.
Left. View looking northeast down the length of the channel. The fissure D vent is the fume near lower left. In this photo, the upper 100 meters (330 ft) or so of the channel is covered by a stationary crust. In the Webcam, this crust can be seen growing downstream, then periodically breaking apart and getting rafted away by the lava channel only to repeat the process again.Right. When the level of the lava in the lava channel is high, as it has been since mid-October, the narrow constrictions in the lava channel often get covered by crusted lava to form bridges. Floating rafts of crust carried by the lava stream get piled up behind the bridges, impounding the lava, and causing the upstream section of the lava channel to become elevated above the downstream section of the channel. This image shows the bridge over the bottleneck between the first and second sections, or "pools", of the lava channel. The elevation difference between the two pools is apparent.

26 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Aerial view of the entire channel, looking downstream.  The sinuous, silver-crusted channel is is about 1.4 km long.  Smoke in the distance marks the farthest extent of the active flows.
The downstream end of the channel is not a dead end, but rather the entrance to a lava tube.  Lava is pouring into the tube on the right side of the channel, beneath the thick gas plume.  In the background, two channel overflows are visible.
Left. Aerial view of the entire channel, looking downstream. The sinuous, silver-crusted channel is is about 1.4 km long. Smoke in the distance marks the farthest extent of the active flows.Right. The downstream end of the channel is not a dead end, but rather the entrance to a lava tube. Lava is pouring into the tube on the right side of the channel, beneath the thick gas plume. In the background, two channel overflows are visible.
Close-up of the channel overflows, which are feeding pahoehoe flows to the south east.  The channel is about 90 m across at its widest point, at far left.
View looking northwest, with Pu`u `O`o in the distance. In the foreground is the silver terminus of the channel overflow.  The terminus of an `a`a flow that is breaking out from the side of the channel levee is overruning the active pahoehoe.
Left. Close-up of the channel overflows, which are feeding pahoehoe flows to the south east. The channel is about 90 m across at its widest point, at far left.Right. View looking northwest, with Pu`u `O`o in the distance. In the foreground is the silver terminus of the channel overflow. The terminus of an `a`a flow that is breaking out from the side of the channel levee is overruning the active pahoehoe.
Geologist snags a lava sample from the channel overflow and dips it into a coffee can filled with water to cool it quickly.  The `a`a flow in the background is overrunning the edge of the pahoehoe.
The active terminus of the tube-fed flow is burning into the margin of the forest 2 km northeast of the end of the channel.  At the lower edge of the photo, active pahoehoe is overrunning lichen-covered `a`a from the early days of Pu`u `O`o (1983-85). This lobe only extends about 100 m beyond previous lobes.
Left. Geologist snags a lava sample from the channel overflow and dips it into a coffee can filled with water to cool it quickly. The `a`a flow in the background is overrunning the edge of the pahoehoe. Right. The active terminus of the tube-fed flow is burning into the margin of the forest 2 km northeast of the end of the channel. At the lower edge of the photo, active pahoehoe is overrunning lichen-covered `a`a from the early days of Pu`u `O`o (1983-85). This lobe only extends about 100 m beyond previous lobes.
Bonus Pic:  Happy Halloween from HVO!
Bonus Pic: Happy Halloween from HVO!

19 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Side view of the perched channel. The fissure D vent is beneath the fuming area to the right, Kupaianaha is the shield vent behind the channel and Pu`u Kahauale`a is the forested kipuka in the foreground
Pahoehoe overflows (light gray) making their way over flows erupted earlier but since July 21 (dark `a`a). The tan `a`a lava flows in the lower right were erupted from Pu`u `O`o in 1983 and 1984.
Left.Side view of the perched channel. The fissure D vent is beneath the fuming area to the right, Kupaianaha is the shield vent behind the channel and Pu`u Kahauale`a is the forested kipuka in the foreground.Right.Pahoehoe overflows (light gray) making their way over flows erupted earlier but since July 21 (dark `a`a). The tan `a`a lava flows in the lower right were erupted from Pu`u `O`o in 1983 and 1984.
South side of the perched channel looking upstream from the northeast end. Overflows dominate the channel in the upper part of the photo, seep-fed lava flows are issuing from the left (south) side of the channel.
Looking up the channel full to overflowing (shiny, some red), seep-fed flows (dark `a`a) on the right (north) side of the channel, Pu`u `O`o is in the background.
Left.South side of the perched channel looking upstream from the northeast end. Overflows dominate the channel in the upper part of the photo, seep-fed lava flows are issuing from the left (south) side of the channel.Right. Looking up the channel full to overflowing (shiny, some red), seep-fed flows (dark `a`a) on the right (north) side of the channel, Pu`u `O`o is in the background.

12 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

View of the eruptive vent and the channel it is currently feeding.  The channel is relatively full, which is creating numerous overflows all along its length.
An `a`a flow seeping from underneath the northwest side of the perched channel’s base.  View is toward the north.
Left.View of the eruptive vent and the channel it is currently feeding. The channel is relatively full, which is creating numerous overflows all along its length. Right. An `a`a flow seeping from underneath the northwest side of the perched channel’s base. View is toward the north.
Looking south across the channel (width ~30 m) at ground level.  The rim on the opposite side is about 3 meters high.  Most of the channel has formed a thin, cracked crust through which lava occasionally spatters.
Previously, a cascade marked the transition from the upper to the lower channel (see images from 10/7/07).  This has since disappeared to be replaced by a more seamless transition at the bend in the channel.  Overflows were seen on both sides of the channel as lava topped the rim.
Left. Looking south across the channel (width ~30 m) at ground level. The rim on the opposite side is about 3 meters high. Most of the channel has formed a thin, cracked crust through which lava occasionally spatters. Right. Previously, a cascade marked the transition from the upper to the lower channel (see images from 10/7/07). This has since disappeared to be replaced by a more seamless transition at the bend in the channel. Overflows were seen on both sides of the channel as lava topped the rim.

9 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Overview of a section of the flow field looking downrift. It is impossible to photograph the entire flow field in one picture without a wide angle lens, owing to its size.
A close up of part of the channel (looking upstream) showing 5-m high channel walls. Previous bathtub rings indicate the level of the lava has dropped. Part of the channel wall (lower centre of image) has calved off and looks like it will soon be rafted away by the flow.
Left.Overview of a section of the flow field looking downrift. It is impossible to photograph the entire flow field in one picture without a wide angle lens, owing to its size. Right.A close up of part of the channel (looking upstream) showing 5-m high channel walls. Previous bathtub rings indicate the level of the lava has dropped. Part of the channel wall (lower centre of image) has calved off and looks like it will soon be rafted away by the flow.
Looking east (downrift) at the lower end of the channel. In the foreground, the steely gray, shinier p?hoehoe are recent overflows from the channel. An active overflow can be seen near the center of the image, flowing off to the right. In the middle distance, a track of incandescence (orange color) indicates the advance of `a`a flows.
A crust has formed over the mouth of Fissure D. The headspace between the lava in the channel and the crust varies according to lava effusion rate. The view is to the south, with the fumes being blown towards the south west by the prevailing winds. The shelly pahoehoe around the channel is a few weeks old.
Left.Looking east (downrift) at the lower end of the channel. In the foreground, the steely gray, shinier pahoehoe are recent overflows from the channel. An active overflow can be seen near the center of the image, flowing off to the right. In the middle distance, a track of incandescence (orange color) indicates the advance of `a`a flows. Right. A crust has formed over the mouth of Fissure D. The headspace between the lava in the channel and the crust varies according to lava effusion rate. The view is to the south, with the fumes being blown towards the south west by the prevailing winds. The shelly pahoehoe around the channel is a few weeks old.

7 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Early morning view of four incandescent patches each indicating an active flow front. The lower channel can be seen behind these fronts with Pu`u `O`o on the horizon. View is to the west.
Lava issuing from northeastern end of lower channel (with pahoehoe draped levees in upper right of photo).
Left.Early morning view of four incandescent patches each indicating an active flow front. The lower channel can be seen behind these fronts with Pu`u `O`o on the horizon. View is to the west. Right.Lava issuing from northeastern end of lower channel (with pahoehoe draped levees in upper right of photo).
Looking upstream at lava cascading out of perched channel and into the lower channel at 6:47 am.
Looking upstream at the lava cascade about 10 minutes later showing that the big block in the cascade has split and is starting to separate while sliding along the channel bottom.
Left.Looking upstream at lava cascading out of perched channel and into the lower channel at 6:47 am. Right. Looking upstream at the lava cascade about 10 minutes later showing that the big block in the cascade has split and is starting to separate while sliding along the channel bottom.

5 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

High altitude view of the perched pond and the lower channel with Pu`u `O`o and its white plume in the upper right. This photo was taken about 2,000 ft above ground level.
Closeup of lava in the perched pond flowing to the left through a constriction.
Left. High altitude view of the perched pond and the lower channel with Pu`u `O`o and its white plume in the upper right. This photo was taken about 2,000 ft above ground level. Right. Closeup of lava in the perched pond flowing to the left through a constriction.
View looking upstream into the cascade at the end of the long perched pond with a block being rafted.
View looking downstream along the lower channel which is about 15 m (50 ft) wide. The inner walls are about 6 m (20 ft) high.
Left. View looking upstream into the cascade at the end of the long perched pond with a block being rafted. Right. View looking downstream along the lower channel which is about 15 m (50 ft) wide. The inner walls are about 6 m (20 ft) high.

3 October 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

View of the east end of the perched pond and the upper part of the lower channel with its various branches active over the last few days. The channel just below the cascade is about 10 m (30 feet) wide.
	Newest flow lobe burning forest on the southern margin of the flow field. Pu`u Kia`i (1977 Kilauea vent) is the tan cone directly behind the burning and Heiheiahulu is the prominent skyline cone.
Left. View of the east end of the perched pond and the upper part of the lower channel with its various branches active over the last few days. The channel just below the cascade is about 10 m (30 feet) wide.Right. Newest flow lobe burning forest on the southern margin of the flow field. Pu`u Kia`i (1977 Kilauea vent) is the tan cone directly behind the burning and Heiheiahulu is the prominent skyline cone.
View up the perched channel with the head of the lower channel in the foreground. Pu`u `O` is in the background.
	Closeup of the cascade at the transition from perched channel to the lower channel. The chunks within the stream and laying about outside the channel are probably bits of the perched channel walls that have been rafted downstream.
Left. View up the perched channel with the head of the lower channel in the foreground. Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the background.Right. Closeup of the cascade at the transition from perched channel to the lower channel. The chunks within the stream and laying about outside the channel are probably bits of the perched channel walls that have been rafted downstream.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


Homeblank spacerVolcano Watchblank spacerProductsblank spacerGalleryblank spacerPress Releases
How Hawaiian Volcanoes Work

The URL of this page is http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/archive/2007_Oct.html
Contact: hvowebmaster@usgs.gov
Updated: 1 Nov 2007 (pnf)