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Kilauea

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Images and Chronology
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30 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

This is a photo of the third of four wide sections of the perched lava channel. The constrictions between the upper three perched sections are tubed over, while the narrow constriction between the third and fourth channel sections remains open (lower left).
	This is the last of the four sections of perched lava channel. The lava channel is fairly well crusted over and is moving very slowly.
Left. This is a photo of the third of four wide sections of the perched lava channel. The constrictions between the upper three perched sections are tubed over, while the narrow constriction between the third and fourth channel sections remains open (lower left).Right. This is the last of the four sections of perched lava channel. The lava channel is fairly well crusted over and is moving very slowly.
At the end of the perched lava channel, the lava cascades down a relatively gentle incline, as seen here, and enters a lower channel that has just begun to become perched.
	The lava channel is feeding a couple of broad, slow-moving `a`a fronts, including this one traveling along the southern margin of the flow field.
Left. At the end of the perched lava channel, the lava cascades down a relatively gentle incline, as seen here, and enters a lower channel that has just begun to become perched.Right. The lava channel is feeding a couple of broad, slow-moving `a`a fronts, including this one traveling along the southern margin of the flow field.

28 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Overview of perched channel cascading through lava falls into lower channel flowing to lower left.
	Closeup of lava falls.
Left. Overview of perched channel cascading through lava falls into lower channel flowing to lower left.Right. Closeup of lava falls.
Vent in lower center of photo, looking down perched channel. Note how full the channel is compared to previous days. The eastern end of the perched channel is above the seep.
	Reinvigorated seep on north side of perched channel issuing `a`a flows.
Left. Vent in lower center of photo, looking down perched channel. Note how full the channel is compared to previous days. The eastern end of the perched channel is above the seep.Right. Reinvigorated seep on north side of perched channel issuing `a`a flows.
First bridge, flow is from right to left. Note that the lava level upstream (to the right) of the bridge is higher than below the bridge.
	Looking south across active flow fronts. The closest is just going into a kipuka, the distant one is advancing slowly along the southern margin of previous flows.
Left. First bridge, flow is from right to left. Note that the lava level upstream (to the right) of the bridge is higher than below the bridge.Right. Looking south across active flow fronts. The closest is just going into a kipuka, the distant one is advancing slowly along the southern margin of previous flows.

25 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

This view, looking uprift, shows the summit crater of Kupaianaha (active from 1986 to 1992). Beyond that, fume rises from fissure D of the July 21 eruption, and the active lava channel can be seen extending off to the right in the image. Pu`u `O`o is heavily fuming in the background near the top of the photo.
Lava erupting from the fissure D vent travels through a perched channel for about 1.4 km (0.9 miles), then turns sharply east and cascades into a lower channel. Lava flows through the lower channel for about 600 m (~2000 ft) before transitioning into an `a`a flow.
Left.This view, looking uprift, shows the summit crater of Kupaianaha (active from 1986 to 1992). Beyond that, fume rises from fissure D of the July 21 eruption, and the active lava channel can be seen extending off to the right in the image. Pu`u `O`o is heavily fuming in the background near the top of the photo.Right.Lava erupting from the fissure D vent travels through a perched channel for about 1.4 km (0.9 miles), then turns sharply east and cascades into a lower channel. Lava flows through the lower channel for about 600 m (~2000 ft) before transitioning into an `a`a flow.
This photo, looking upstream, shows the gentle, multi-level cascade of lava from the end of the perched lava channel down into the lower channel.
	This is a near-vertical view of the lava cascade at the end of the perched channel. Down-stream is toward the top of the photo.
Left.This photo, looking upstream, shows the gentle, multi-level cascade of lava from the end of the perched lava channel down into the lower channel.Right. This is a near-vertical view of the lava cascade at the end of the perched channel. Down-stream is toward the top of the photo.
The surface of the lava stream in the both the perched channel and much of the lower channel is covered by a pahoehoe crust. About halfway down the lower channel, the surface texture of the lava stream changes abruptly where it pours over a small lava falls. The combination of turbulent action and cooling is just enough to cause the textural change from smooth pieces of crust to more blocky looking chunks.
The terminus of the main `a`a flow fed by the lava channel is about 1.8 km (1.1 miles) beyond the end of the lower lava channel. The terminus is not all that active, but continues to advance slowly.
Left. The surface of the lava stream in the both the perched channel and much of the lower channel is covered by a pahoehoe crust. About halfway down the lower channel, the surface texture of the lava stream changes abruptly where it pours over a small lava falls. The combination of turbulent action and cooling is just enough to cause the textural change from smooth pieces of crust to more blocky looking chunks.Right. The terminus of the main `a`a flow fed by the lava channel is about 1.8 km (1.1 miles) beyond the end of the lower lava channel. The terminus is not all that active, but continues to advance slowly.

23 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Lower, easternmost end of the feeder channel enters middle right side of photo flowing to the left before making an almost 90 degree turn to the right to feed an `a`a flow. Patch of incandescent lava in lower middle of the photo is the barely active seep on the north side of the feeder channel.
Closeup of lava pouring from the end of the feeder channel (lower right) into the `a`a flow channel (toward upper right) rafting a few big blocks of channel wall.
Left. Lower, easternmost end of the feeder channel enters middle right side of photo flowing to the left before making an almost 90 degree turn to the right to feed an `a`a flow. Patch of incandescent lava in lower middle of the photo is the barely active seep on the north side of the feeder channel.Right. Closeup of lava pouring from the end of the feeder channel (lower right) into the `a`a flow channel (toward upper right) rafting a few big blocks of channel wall.
Looking up the feeder channel to the vent, Pu`u `O`o is in the background. Spots of incandescence on the right side of the feeder channel are seeping out of the channel base.
Active fronts of two lava flows moving eastward, one along the southern margin of previous flows and one just to right of kipuka on previous flows.
Left. Looking up the feeder channel to the vent, Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the background. Spots of incandescence on the right side of the feeder channel are seeping out of the channel base.Right. Active fronts of two lava flows moving eastward, one along the southern margin of previous flows and one just to right of kipuka on previous flows.

21 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Photo of two bridges over the channel that have survived two drops of lava in the channel in the last week. The north flank of Kupaianaha is on the left side of the photo and the outline of Heiheiahulu cone is on the horizon.
Looking down `a`a flow toward the flow front. The channel end is in the foreground. Note the chunks of channel wall that have been pushed out and that are sticking up above the other lava flows. Pu`u Kia`i, the largest vent of the 1977 eruption, is just beyond and to the right of the farthest flow tip. Heiheiahulu again is on the horizon.
Left. Photo of two bridges over the channel that have survived two drops of lava in the channel in the last week. The north flank of Kupaianaha is on the left side of the photo and the outline of Heiheiahulu cone is on the horizon. Right. Looking down `a`a flow toward the flow front. The channel end is in the foreground. Note the chunks of channel wall that have been pushed out and that are sticking up above the other lava flows. Pu`u Kia`i, the largest vent of the 1977 eruption, is just beyond and to the right of the farthest flow tip. Heiheiahulu again is on the horizon.
Looking up channel with breach actually extending the channel and feeding an `a`a flow to the lower left. Pu`u `O`o is in the upper right of the photo.
Closeup of the stream exiting to the lower left from the breach in the channel end. Note the chunks of crust that are being ripped apart as they are rafted along the stream.
Left. Looking up channel with breach actually extending the channel and feeding an `a`a flow to the lower left. Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the upper right of the photo. Right. Closeup of the stream exiting to the lower left from the breach in the channel end. Note the chunks of crust that are being ripped apart as they are rafted along the stream.

18 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Looking up channel at 1:20 pm, breached end in foreground.
Looking up channel at 3:20 pm. The level of lava in the channel is higher.
Left. Looking up channel at 1:20 pm, breached end in foreground. Right. Looking up channel at 3:20 pm. The level of lava in the channel is higher.
Closeup of channel breach being blocked by a chunk of channel wall.
Looking toward vent showing two bridges and nearly full channel.
Left. Closeup of channel breach being blocked by a chunk of channel wall. Right. Looking toward vent showing two bridges and nearly full channel.
View of breach in channel end at 1:20 pm.
View of breach in channel end at 3:20 pm. The level of lava is higher in the channel.
Left. View of breach in channel end at 1:20 pm. Right. View of breach in channel end at 3:20 pm. The level of lava is higher in the channel.

16 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Looking toward vent along channel showing the section crusted over the vent, Fissure D.
Lava flowing in channel under one of two bridges left after lava level dropped.
Left. Looking toward vent along channel showing the section crusted over the vent, Fissure D. Right. Lava flowing in channel under one of two bridges left after lava level dropped.
A narrow channel section promoting a lava rapids.
Lava draining out of the breach at the eastern end of the channel.
Left. A narrow channel section promoting a lava rapids. Right. Lava draining out of the breach at the eastern end of the channel.
Looking up channel toward vent; two `a`a flows fed through breach are in the foreground, Pu`u `O`o is in the background.
View of the stalled flow (dark) that was moving to the east. Pu`u Kia`i is to the lower left.
Left. Looking up channel toward vent; two `a`a flows fed through breach are in the foreground, Pu‘u ‘O‘o is in the background. Right. View of the stalled flow (dark) that was moving to the east. Pu`u Kia`i is to the lower left.

14 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Lower, easternmost portion of channel separated into sections by crusted surfaces.
Overview of the easternmost section of channel. Smoke in the distance is the advancing front of a new flow to the east. Kalalua is the forested cone behind the channel on the right edge of the photo.
Left. Lower, easternmost portion of channel separated into sections by crusted surfaces. Right. Overview of the easternmost section of channel. Smoke in the distance is the advancing front of a new flow to the east. Kalalua is the forested cone behind the channel on the right edge of the photo.
Looking back up the channel from the lower perched end toward the vent.
A view of the lower, easternmost end of the channel from the south. Note the uplifted and rotated block (former wall of channel) in the lower right of the photo suggesting that it was undermined and lifted by lava intruding beneath it from deep in the channel. Kupaianaha is the feature to the left of the 7/21 channel and flows and Pu`u `O`o is in the upper right of the photo.
Left. Looking back up the channel from the lower perched end toward the vent. Right. A view of the lower, easternmost end of the channel from the south. Note the uplifted and rotated block (former wall of channel) in the lower right of the photo suggesting that it was undermined and lifted by lava intruding beneath it from deep in the channel. Kupaianaha is the feature to the left of the 7/21 channel and flows and Pu`u `O`o is in the upper right of the photo.
The flow advancing just north of Pu`u Kia`i. Its channel is crusted over and a pahoehoe breakout is issuing from the right (northeast) side.
Looking south at overflow from channel. Kupaianaha is looming in the background.
Left.The flow advancing just north of Pu`u Kia`i. Its channel is crusted over and a pahoehoe breakout is issuing from the right (northeast) side. Kupaianaha is the shield vent to the left of the darker, recent flows with Pu`u `O`o looming behind it.Right. Looking south at overflow from channel. Kupaianaha is looming in the background.

11 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

The lava channel from fissure D was full today, and overflowing from several places along the channel length. Part of the channel was crusted over (middle of photo) about 300–400 yards downstream from the fissure.
View looking southwest back up the lava channel toward the fissure D vent fuming in the background.  The numerous overflows from the channel over the last several days have decreased the slope of the channel. Now, when the channel begins to back up, it backs up all the way to the vent.
Left. The lava channel from fissure D was full today, and overflowing from several places along the channel length. Part of the channel was crusted over (middle of photo) about 300–400 yards downstream from the fissure. Right. View looking southwest back up the lava channel toward the fissure D vent fuming in the background. The numerous overflows from the channel over the last several days have decreased the slope of the channel. Now, when the channel begins to back up, it backs up all the way to the vent.
Another view of lava channel, this one looking west toward Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Overflows are feeding a small pahoehoe flow (lower left) skirting east around the north side of Kupaianaha (left side of photo).
This overflow is from the northwest side of the channel, and other overflows can be seen heading east on the opposite side of the channel.
Left. Another view of lava channel, this one looking west toward Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Overflows are feeding a small pahoehoe flow (lower left) skirting east around the north side of Kupaianaha (left side of photo). Right. This overflow is from the northwest side of the channel, and other overflows can be seen heading east on the opposite side of the channel.

9 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

End of refilled channel viewed from the northwest.
Closeup of the channel constricted by a series of islands.
Left. End of refilled channel viewed from the northwest. Right. Closeup of the channel constricted by a series of islands.
End of channel viewed from the south.
End of channel view from the northeast. Note the deeply incised channel and overflows.
Left. End of channel viewed from the south. Right. End of channel view from the northeast. Note the deeply incised channel and overflows.

7 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Northeast end of the lava channel that breached last night. The lava spills out of the end, flows around the chunk of remaining channel wall, and rejoin a flow moving northeast over previous flows.
Another view of the breached channel end. The tan flows in the distance are those erupted from Pu`u `O`o between 1983 and 1986.
Left.Northeast end of the lava channel that breached last night. The lava spills out of the end, flows around the chunk of remaining channel wall, and rejoin a flow moving northeast over previous flows. Right. Another view of the breached channel end. The tan flows in the distance are those erupted from Pu`u `O`o between 1983 and 1986.
Active front of the flow spawned by the channel breach is at the photo bottom, looking up flow and channel.
Vent and start of channel showing a bit of crusting. The arching crust broke down by the end of the day.
Left. Active front of the flow spawned by the channel breach is at the photo bottom, looking up flow and channel. Right. Vent and start of channel showing a bit of crusting. The arching crust broke down by the end of the day.
Looking vertically down on a section of the channel.
View down channel from source. Silvery flows are the recent overflows.
Left. Looking vertically down on a section of the channel. Right. View down channel from source. Silvery flows are the recent overflows.

4 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

View from fissure D vent down the full channel. The shiny flow immediately adjacent to the channel are overflows that have happened in the last day.
Closeup of the lower end of the full channel. Note the built up walls perching the channel lava, the spillover feeding a flow advancing along the northeast margin of previous flows, and the seeps feeding a flow advancing along the southern margin of previous flows.
Left. View from fissure D vent down the full channel. The shiny flow immediately adjacent to the channel are overflows that have happened in the last day. Right. Closeup of the lower end of the full channel. Note the built up walls perching the channel lava, the spillover feeding a flow advancing along the northeast margin of previous flows, and the seeps feeding a flow advancing along the southern margin of previous flows.
View of the front of the flow advancing northeast early in the morning still moving over older Pu`u `O`o lavas.
The flow advancing northeast reached the forest before noon.
Left. View of the front of the flow advancing northeast early in the morning still moving over older Pu‘u ‘O‘o lavas. Right. The flow advancing northeast reached the forest before noon.
Lower end of channel showing details of the seeps feeding a flow advancing along the southern margin.
Front of the flow advancing along the southern margin.
Left. Lower end of channel showing details of the seeps feeding a flow advancing along the southern margin. Right. Front of the flow advancing along the southern margin.

2 September 2007

July 21 Fissure Eruption

Movie clip-Aerial of eddy in channel near vent D. 1.1MB
Movie clip-Aerial of eddy in channel near vent D. 1.1MB
Closeup of the `a`a flow advancing along the south side of flow 1.
A couple of the sources of the `a`a flow advancing along the south side of flow 1.
Left. Closeup of the `a`a flow advancing along the south side of flow 1. Right. A couple of the sources of the `a`a flow advancing along the south side of flow 1.
D1 vent edges are crusted and is building a spatter cover.
Midsection of the channel estimated to be about 50 m (150 ft) wide at the widest.
Left. D1 vent edges are crusted and is building a spatter cover. Right. Midsection of the channel estimated to be about 50 m (150 ft) wide at the widest.
End of the channel in the foreground looking back toward vent. A spillover is feeding an `a`a flow advancing to the northeast (to the right in the photo) over previous flows. Several seeps on the south (left) side of the channel feed an `a`a flow advancing along the south side of previous flows.
Closeup of channelized `a`a flow advancing NNE over previous flows.
Left. End of the channel in the foreground looking back toward vent. A spillover is feeding an `a`a flow advancing to the northeast (to the right in the photo) over previous flows. Several seeps on the south (left) side of the channel feed an `a`a flow advancing along the south side of previous flows. Right.Closeup of channelized `a`a flow advancing NNE over previous flows.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 30 Sep 2007 (pnf)