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Kilauea

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Images and Chronology
Looking for images you could swear you saw here but can't find now? Check Image Archive

27 April 2008

A visually stunning night from the pre-moonrise star show!

Since tradewinds have stiffened, the sky is clear, showing the awesome pre-moonrise stars and the intense Halema`uma`u glow.
Moonlit view of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, showing the Halema`uma`u plume in the background.
Left. Since tradewinds have stiffened, the sky is clear, showing the awesome pre-moonrise stars and the intense Halema`uma`u glow. Right. Moonlit view of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, showing the Halema`uma`u plume in the background.

24 April 2008

Visual/Thermal images, Waikupanaha entry plume and upwelling from heated water

Three rising plumes mark the location of the primary ocean entry points on the Waikupanaha delta.  Not surprisingly, the ocean water near the entry points is heated substantially by the lava, as shown by the thermal image on the right.
Three rising plumes mark the location of the primary ocean entry points on the Waikupanaha delta. Not surprisingly, the ocean water near the entry points is heated substantially by the lava, as shown by the thermal image on the right.
Hazy conditions upslope resulted in poor photos, leaving the coast as the only area with decent views. This view, looking west, shows the Waikupanaha entry plume. The County lava viewing area is visible just below center. The Ki entry (the point just beyond the viewing area but closer than the laze plume) has been inactive for several days.
 Water heated when lava enters the ocean often causes an area of upwelling as the hot water rises. The smooth surface of water upwelling off the western-most Waikupanaha entry point stands out in the center of this photo.
Left. Hazy conditions upslope resulted in poor photos, leaving the coast as the only area with decent views. This view, looking west, shows the Waikupanaha entry plume. The County lava viewing area is visible just below center. The Ki entry (the point just beyond the viewing area but closer than the laze plume) has been inactive for several days. Right. Water heated when lava enters the ocean often causes an area of upwelling as the hot water rises. The smooth surface of water upwelling off the western-most Waikupanaha entry point stands out in the center of this photo.
Lava - in tubes - flows through Royal Gardens, across the coastal plain and into the sea at the Waikupanaha ocean entries.  The thermal image on the right shows three recent breakouts (lava which has broken out from the tube onto the surface) on the coastal plain.  Only the most distant breakout, at the base of the pali, was active on Thursday morning.
Lava - in tubes - flows through Royal Gardens, across the coastal plain and into the sea at the Waikupanaha ocean entries. The thermal image on the right shows three recent breakouts (lava which has broken out from the tube onto the surface) on the coastal plain. Only the most distant breakout, at the base of the pali, was active on Thursday morning.

22 April 2008

Breakouts at TEB, pour back into skylight and wispy entry at Waikupanaha

A breakout from the TEB lava tube near the base of the Royal Gardens subdivision was feeding a small `a`a flow this morning.
 The breakout was confined to the lower, central part of the flow field between Paradise and Orchid Streets.
Left. A breakout from the TEB lava tube near the base of the Royal Gardens subdivision was feeding a small `a`a flow this morning. Right. The breakout was confined to the lower, central part of the flow field between Paradise and Orchid Streets.
Farther up-slope, another small breakout flowed only a short distance before pouring back into a skylight and rejoining the main lava stream.
 At the coast, activity was very subdued with only a tiny, wispy entry near the west end of the Waikupanaha delta.
Left. Farther up-slope, another small breakout flowed only a short distance before pouring back into a skylight and rejoining the main lava stream. Right. At the coast, activity was very subdued with only a tiny, wispy entry near the west end of the Waikupanaha delta.

18 April 2008

Trade winds return to Kilauea's summit

After a day of vog on April 17, trade winds strengthened today and blew the gas-and-ash plume from Halema`uma`u to the southwest.
 Aerial view of the vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u Crater.
Left. After a day of vog on April 17, trade winds strengthened today and blew the gas-and-ash plume from Halema`uma`u to the southwest. Right. Aerial view of the vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u Crater.

Busy day on the east rift zone

Pu`u `O`o fumes mightily on the skyline, while numerous small plumes rise from the tube leading from the TEB vent.  An active, shiny pahoehoe flow fans out from the TEB tube in the foreground.  View is to the northwest.
 Twin plumes rise from the Waikapanaha ocean entry, while the Ki entry has no visible activity.
Left. Pu`u `O`o fumes mightily on the skyline, while numerous small plumes rise from the tube leading from the TEB vent. An active, shiny pahoehoe flow fans out from the TEB tube in the foreground. View is to the northwest. Right. Twin plumes rise from the Waikapanaha ocean entry, while the Ki entry has no visible activity.
Geologists measure the electrical field across the lava tube above Royal Gardens.  These measurements are used to determine the cross-sectional area of the lava in the tube.  Combined with measurements of the speed of the molten stream, this allows scientists to calculate the volume of lava flowing through the tube.
 Geologist points radar gun at speeding lava stream inside the tube to determine how fast it's flowing.
Left. Geologists measure the electrical field across the lava tube above Royal Gardens. These measurements are used to determine the cross-sectional area of the lava in the tube. Combined with measurements of the speed of the molten stream, this allows scientists to calculate the volume of lava flowing through the tube. Right. Geologist points radar gun at speeding lava stream inside the tube to determine how fast it's flowing.
Geologist cleans off the webcam box on the rim of Pu`u `O`o.  A small collapse inside the Pu`u `O`o crater on the rainy afternoon of April 17 coated the box with mud.
 The webcam and a wooden box for catching Pele's tears and spatter are perched on the rim of Pu`u `O`o.  The crater is enshrouded in fume, precluding any view of the effects of yesterday's collapse.
Left. Geologist cleans off the webcam box on the rim of Pu`u `O`o. A small collapse inside the Pu`u `O`o crater on the rainy afternoon of April 17 coated the box with mud. Right. The webcam and a wooden box for catching Pele's tears and spatter are perched on the rim of Pu`u `O`o. The crater is enshrouded in fume, precluding any view of the effects of yesterday's collapse.

17 April 2008

Morning views of plume and vehicle tracks

Early morning plethora of volcano photographers at the Jaggar Museum Overlook.
 Morning view of the plume from the southwest.
Left. Early morning plethora of volcano photographers at the Jaggar Museum Overlook. Right. Morning view of the plume from the southwest.
HVO field vehicle and tracks through the red dust produced during the small April 16 explosion.
Pink ash/mud caked onto the field vehicle back at HVO.
Left. HVO field vehicle and tracks through the red dust produced during the small April 16 explosion. Right. Pink ash/mud caked onto the field vehicle back at HVO.

16 April 2008

Small explosion from Halema`uma`u ejects red rock dust

A small explosion took place from the new vent at about 4 a.m. on April 16.  Geologists' truck leaves tracks in the pale-red rock dust that coated Crater Rim Drive near the Halema`uma`u parking lot.
 Geologist cleans out ash collector near the southeast rim of  Halema`uma`u.
Left. A small explosion took place from the new vent at about 4 a.m. on April 16. Geologists' truck leaves tracks in the pale-red rock dust that coated Crater Rim Drive near the Halema`uma`u parking lot. Right. Geologist cleans out ash collector near the southeast rim of Halema`uma`u.
Following the explosion, the vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u was emitting its usual gas plume, which also contains a small amount of ash.
Geologists sweep all the ash from a square meter of the road, in order to calculate the rate of ash accumulation in the last 24 hrs.
Left. Following the explosion, the vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u was emitting its usual gas plume, which also contains a small amount of ash.Right. Geologists sweep all the ash from a square meter of the road, in order to calculate the rate of ash accumulation in the last 24 hrs.

Breakouts active on flow field

An active breakout from a glowing hornito near the TEB vent was feeding a small pahoehoe flow on the west side of the shield complex this morning.  View is to the northeast.
Vigorous steam plumes rise from the Waikapanaha ocean entry this morning. Geologist cleans out ash collector near the southeast rim of  Halema`uma`u.
Left. An active breakout from a glowing hornito near the TEB vent was feeding a small pahoehoe flow on the west side of the shield complex this morning. View is to the northeast. Right. Vigorous steam plumes rise from the Waikapanaha ocean entry this morning.
A lovely braided lava channel emanated from a skylight on the east side of the 2008 Royal Gardens flow field.  This photo is looking upstream to the source.
The channelized `a`a flow extended about 50 meters beyond the base of the pali.
Left. A lovely braided lava channel emanated from a skylight on the east side of the 2008 Royal Gardens flow field. This photo is looking upstream to the source. Right. The channelized `a`a flow extended about 50 meters beyond the base of the pali.

13 April 2008

Blue Kilauea

Halema`uma`u plume below and cirrus clouds above made for a spectacular sky early on the morning of April 11.  Photos taken from the Steaming Bluff.
Halema`uma`u plume below and cirrus clouds above made for a spectacular sky early on the morning of April 11. Photos taken from the Steaming Bluff.
Halema`uma`u plume below and cirrus clouds above made for a spectacular sky early on the morning of April 11.  Photos taken from the Steaming Bluff.
Halema`uma`u plume below and cirrus clouds above made for a spectacular sky early on the morning of April 11. Photos taken from the Steaming Bluff.

11 April 2008

Aerial views of Halema`uma`u and TEB vents

Halema`uma`u plume from the east rim.  The overlook fence is on the rim just to the left of the plume.
 Aerial view of vent.  The lip of the vent that separated it from the crater floor collapsed into the vent just before the explosion on April 9.
Left. Halema`uma`u plume from the east rim. The overlook fence is on the rim just to the left of the plume. Right. Aerial view of vent. The lip of the vent that separated it from the crater floor collapsed into the vent just before the explosion on April 9.
Aerial view looking down-tube-towards Royal Gardens-from the TEB vent.  Forested Kalalua cone is at upper left.
Close-up of TEB vent showing incandescent hole to the side of the main collapse pit.
Left. Aerial view looking down-tube-towards Royal Gardens-from the TEB vent. Forested Kalalua cone is at upper left.Right. Close-up of TEB vent showing incandescent hole to the side of the main collapse pit.
Breakout burns vegetation on the margin of the TEB flow, just inland of the Ki entry.
 Smoke from the breakout joins the plumes from the ocean entries.  The viewing area is at far right.
Left. Breakout burns vegetation on the margin of the TEB flow, just inland of the Ki entry. Right. Smoke from the breakout joins the plumes from the ocean entries. The viewing area is at far right.

10 April 2008

PRESS RELEASE - Halema‘uma‘u Vent Explodes a Second Time

Small explosion from Halema`uma`u

At 11:08 p.m. on April 9, Halema`uma`u produced a small explosion. Blocks from the explosion hit the Halema`uma`u overlook fence, which was already damaged by the March 19 explosion. Halema`uma`u from Steaming Bluff.
Explosion debris in ash collector near the overlook. Wooden box is about 1.5 by 2 feet.
Left. At 11:08 p.m. on April 9, Halema`uma`u produced a small explosion. Blocks from the explosion hit the Halema`uma`u overlook fence, which was already damaged by the March 19 explosion.Right. Explosion debris in ash collector near the overlook. Wooden box is about 1.5 by 2 feet.
Hot fragments melted a hole in this plastic bucket, which was used as an ash collector.
Hot fragments melted a hole in this plastic bucket, which was used as an ash collector.
Before and after photographs show the enlargement of the vent during the explosion.
Before and after photographs show the enlargement of the vent during the explosion.

Trade winds return

Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at 5 p.m.
Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at 5 p.m.

9 April 2008

Halema`uma`u plumes from Highway 11 and Steaming Bluff

Halema`uma`u plume dominates the scene as motorists on Highway 11 approach Volcano.
Halema`uma`u from Steaming Bluff.
Left. Halema`uma`u plume dominates the scene as motorists on Highway 11 approach Volcano.Right. Halema`uma`u from Steaming Bluff.

8 April 2008

Wind change sends plume northeastward and full-view showing plumes from both Halema`uma`u and Pu`u `o`

This was the view from the Mauna Loa Strip Road in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park at 7 a.m. this morning. Stagnant surface winds, combined with higher elevation winds from the southwest, caused the plume to rise straight up and then shear off to the northeast.
This was the view from the Mauna Loa Strip Road in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park at 7 a.m. this morning. Stagnant surface winds, combined with higher elevation winds from the southwest, caused the plume to rise straight up and then shear off to the northeast.
Closer views of the panorama taken from the Mauna Loa Strip Road at 7 a.m.
Closer views of the panorama taken from the Mauna Loa Strip Road at 7 a.m.
Closer views of the panorama taken from the Mauna Loa Strip Road at 7 a.m.
Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at 5 p.m.
Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at 5 p.m.
View of the Halema`uma`u plume from Pu`u `O`o. The plumes from both vents were blown northward this morning.
Another view of the Halema`uma`u (left) and the Pu`u `O`o (right)  plumes above the pali being blown northward (to the right) by the wind while the steam plumes from the ocean entries are being blown to the west.
Left. View of the Halema`uma`u plume from Pu`u `O`o. The plumes from both vents were blown northward this morning.Right. Another view of the Halema`uma`u (left) and the Pu`u `O`o (right) plumes above the pali being blown northward (to the right) by the wind while the steam plumes from the ocean entries are being blown to the west.

7 April 2008

Southeastward plumes from Halema`uma`u

Southeastward Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory taken in the early morning.
Southeastward Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory taken in the early morning.
Southeastward Halema`uma`u plume from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory taken in the early morning.

6 April 2008

Littoral explosions at Waikupanaha entry

Movie of the littoral explosions at Waikupanaha.
Movie of the littoral explosions at Waikupanaha. [6MB in size.]
Geologists visiting the ocean entries late yesterday morning were treated to a display of explosive activity at the Waikupanaha entry.  An enormous steam and gas plume rose from the entry.
Molten spatter was visible at the base of the plume.  The explosive activity continued for about an hour.
Left. Geologists visiting the ocean entries late yesterday morning were treated to a display of explosive activity at the Waikupanaha entry. An enormous steam and gas plume rose from the entry. Right. Molten spatter was visible at the base of the plume. The explosive activity continued for about an hour.
The explosions took place at the edge of the lava bench, where spatter and smaller fragments were hurled as high as 20 m.  Much of the ejecta landed in the water, but enough landed on the bench to form the beginnings of a littoral cone.
The explosions took place at the edge of the lava bench, where spatter and smaller fragments were hurled as high as 20 m.  Much of the ejecta landed in the water, but enough landed on the bench to form the beginnings of a littoral cone.
The explosions took place at the edge of the lava bench, where spatter and smaller fragments were hurled as high as 20 m. Much of the ejecta landed in the water, but enough landed on the bench to form the beginnings of a littoral cone.
In contrast to its neighbor, the Ki entry was calm yesterday, with a few lava streams quietly entering the sea.
In contrast to its neighbor, the Ki entry was calm yesterday, with a few lava streams quietly entering the sea.

5 April 2008

Lehua for Halema`uma`u

Dark skies, shifting winds, and `ohi`a trees in bloom made for dramatic views of the Halema`uma`u plume late on the afternoon of April 5.  These photos were taken from the Volcano House on the northeast rim of the caldera.
Dark skies, shifting winds, and `ohi`a trees in bloom made for dramatic views of the Halema`uma`u plume late on the afternoon of April 5.  These photos were taken from the Volcano House on the northeast rim of the caldera.
Dark skies, shifting winds, and `ohi`a trees in bloom made for dramatic views of the Halema`uma`u plume late on the afternoon of April 5. These photos were taken from the Volcano House on the northeast rim of the caldera.
Views from Steaming Bluffs on the north rim of the caldera.
Views from Steaming Bluffs on the north rim of the caldera.
Views from Steaming Bluffs on the north rim of the caldera.

4 April 2008

Halema`uma`u plume sheds hair

Light trades contribute to a gloomy morning at Kilauea's summit.  The amount of ash in the plume has diminished over the past few days.  Most of what is currently being ejected is Pele's hair and tears-both forms of volcanic glass.
The last two days of fallout from the Halema`uma`u plume have produced thick accumulations of Pele's hair on the downwind sides of curbs in the closed parking lot.
Left. Light trades contribute to a gloomy morning at Kilauea's summit. The amount of ash in the plume has diminished over the past few days. Most of what is currently being ejected is Pele's hair and tears-both forms of volcanic glass. Right. The last two days of fallout from the Halema`uma`u plume have produced thick accumulations of Pele's hair on the downwind sides of curbs in the closed parking lot.
Matched aerial views of the vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u Crater, taken with regular and infrared cameras at the same time on April 3.
Matched aerial views of the vent on the south wall of Halema`uma`u Crater, taken with regular and infrared cameras at the same time on April 3.

3 April 2008

From the summit to the sea

The view at Kilauea's summit at about 8 a.m. this morning.  Weakened trade winds permitted the Halema`uma`u plume to rise above a thermal inversion layer and spread, making for poor visibility.
By 10 a.m., when this picture was taken, the trades had picked up.  View is to the southwest, toward the Ka`u desert, where much of the ash has fallen.
Left. The view at Kilauea's summit at about 8 a.m. this morning. Weakened trade winds permitted the Halema`uma`u plume to rise above a thermal inversion layer and spread, making for poor visibility. Right. By 10 a.m., when this picture was taken, the trades had picked up. View is to the southwest, toward the Ka`u desert, where much of the ash has fallen.
Pu`u `O`o crater overflows with fume on a cool morning.
Aerial view looking uprift from Pu`u Kiai, the vent for the 1977 eruption, which is partially visible in the foreground.  The forested kipuka with the scorched edges is Kalalua, a prehistoric cone.  The small plume comes from the TEB vent, and the large white plume on the skyline is from Pu`u `O`o.
Left. Pu`u `O`o crater overflows with fume on a cool morning.Right. Aerial view looking uprift from Pu`u Kiai, the vent for the 1977 eruption, which is partially visible in the foreground. The forested kipuka with the scorched edges is Kalalua, a prehistoric cone. The small plume comes from the TEB vent, and the large white plume on the skyline is from Pu`u `O`o.
Fume rises from a lava tube in upper Royal Gardens subdivision. The coastal plain and ocean are in the background.
View looking west at the coast.  Smoke rises from the edge of the active flow inland of the Ki entry.  At center, a narrow finger of the new flow touches the 1980s vintage Quarry flow in the foreground.
Left. Fume rises from a lava tube in upper Royal Gardens subdivision. The coastal plain and ocean are in the background.Right. View looking west at the coast. Smoke rises from the edge of the active flow inland of the Ki entry. At center, a narrow finger of the new flow touches the 1980s vintage Quarry flow in the foreground.
Plume from the Waikupanaha entry casts a shadow on the sea in the early morning sun.
Plume from the Waikupanaha entry casts a shadow on the sea in the early morning sun.

2 April 2008

The ash collector and movie clip of Halema`uma`u

Geologist on the south rim of Halema`uma`u Crater collects the contents of an ash collector.  The collector is on a tripod to avoid wind blown ash at ground level.
The bag contains 8-hours worth of ash collected at this site.  The ash is composed of rock fragments, Pele's hair and tears, and small bits of spatter.
Left. Geologist on the south rim of Halema`uma`u Crater collects the contents of an ash collector. The collector is on a tripod to avoid wind blown ash at ground level. Right. The bag contains 8-hours worth of ash collected at this site. The ash is composed of rock fragments, Pele's hair and tears, and small bits of spatter.
Video clip taken from the southeast rim of Halema`uma`u at 3 p.m. on April 2.
Video clip taken from the southeast rim of Halema`uma`u at 3 p.m. on April 2.

1 April 2008

From the summit to the sea

Geologist checks a time lapse camera that is canted out over the edge of Halema`uma`u Crater near the former overlook.
The time lapse camera looks down into the new vent.  Strong trade winds are blowing the gas-and-ash plume to the left.
Left. Geologist checks a time lapse camera that is canted out over the edge of Halema`uma`u Crater near the former overlook. Right. The time lapse camera looks down into the new vent. Strong trade winds are blowing the gas-and-ash plume to the left.
Fume rises from lava tubes that descend the pali through Royal Gardens subdivision.  All of the lava that is flowing to the ocean is taking this route.
Aerial view looking west of the ocean entries this morning.  The visitor overlook is at right center.
Left. Fume rises from lava tubes that descend the pali through Royal Gardens subdivision. All of the lava that is flowing to the ocean is taking this route. Right. Aerial view looking west of the ocean entries this morning. The visitor overlook is at right center.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 27 April 2008 (pnf)