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Images and Chronology
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29 February 2008

Channelized `a`a flow hit the coastal plain in Royal Gardens subdivision and a new `a`a flow

Channelized `a`a flows continue to stream down to the bottom of the pali in Royal Gardens subdivision where they hit the coastal plain between Royal Avenue and King Avenue. The mix of pahoehoe and `a`a lava that fills the bottom center of the picture was deposited overnight, and extends some 520 out from the pali out of the sight of this photo.
A new `a`a flow is creeping down the west side of the flow that remains active in Royal Gardens. Its terminus, shown here, is still several hundred meters upslope.
Left.Channelized `a`a flows continue to stream down to the bottom of the pali in Royal Gardens subdivision where they hit the coastal plain between Royal Avenue and King Avenue. The mix of pahoehoe and `a`a lava that fills the bottom center of the picture was deposited overnight, and extends some 520 out from the pali out of the sight of this photo. Right.A new `a`a flow is creeping down the west side of the flow that remains active in Royal Gardens. Its terminus, shown here, is still several hundred meters upslope.

28 February 2008

Lava flows cutting through Royal Gardens subdivision

View of the lava flows cutting through the Royal Gardens subdivision. The cross street is Paradise Street; the street running up the pali with lava in it is Royal Avenue. The top of the subdivision is in shadow at the top of the pali. Pu`u `O`o is fuming in the background.
There have been two dominant lobe crossing Royal Gardens, one coming down Royal Avenue (to the right) and the other, more dominant flow, coming down Prince Avenue (to the left). The Prince Avenue flow, shown here, cuts to the east near the Prince/Paradise intersection and crosses the intersection of Royal and Orchid at the bottom right of the photo.
Left.View of the lava flows cutting through the Royal Gardens subdivision. The cross street is Paradise Street; the street running up the pali with lava in it is Royal Avenue. The top of the subdivision is in shadow at the top of the pali. Pu`u `O`o is fuming in the background.Right.There have been two dominant lobe crossing Royal Gardens, one coming down Royal Avenue (to the right) and the other, more dominant flow, coming down Prince Avenue (to the left). The Prince Avenue flow, shown here, cuts to the east near the Prince/Paradise intersection and crosses the intersection of Royal and Orchid at the bottom right of the photo.
The flow on Royal Avenue didn't stop for the stop sign at the Royal/Paradise intersection. Part of the flow diverted east down Paradise Street, while the main thrust of the flow continued down Royal, toward the bottom of the photo.
This is one of several lava streams of the Prince Avenue flow slicing through the forest between the cross streets of Paradise and Orchid. The lava stream is about 3 meters (10 feet) wide.
Left.The flow on Royal Avenue didn't stop for the stop sign at the Royal/Paradise intersection. Part of the flow diverted east down Paradise Street, while the main thrust of the flow continued down Royal, toward the bottom of the photo.Right. This is one of several lava streams of the Prince Avenue flow slicing through the forest between the cross streets of Paradise and Orchid. The lava stream is about 3 meters (10 feet) wide.
Lava fed by the western-most lava stream of the flow on Prince Avenue crossed Orchid Street just west of Royal Avenue in early afternoon.
After crossing Orchid Street, the western branch of the Prince Avenue flow intersected and followed the lower end of Royal Avenue, and soon reached the coastal plain at the base of the pali. Another branch of the Prince Avenue flow, extending off to the right through the middle of the photo, reached the coastal plain by mid-morning. The flow lobe following Royal Street down from the top of the pali can be seen near top left.
Left.Lava fed by the western-most lava stream of the flow on Prince Avenue crossed Orchid Street just west of Royal Avenue in early afternoon.Right.After crossing Orchid Street, the western branch of the Prince Avenue flow intersected and followed the lower end of Royal Avenue, and soon reached the coastal plain at the base of the pali. Another branch of the Prince Avenue flow, extending off to the right through the middle of the photo, reached the coastal plain by mid-morning. The flow lobe following Royal Street down from the top of the pali can be seen near top left.
View from the coastal plain looking back at the lava flows on the pali. The two flows reaching the base of the pali are part of the flow lobe that followed Prince Avenue most of the way through the subdivision. The smoke at upper right is from the flow lobe that followed Royal Avenue through the subdivision. The remaining sliver of Royal Avenue, just above and to the right of photo center, will likely be consumed before tomorrow.
View of an `a`a flow moving through vegetation. What else can be said? Lava. Fire. Pretty.
Left.View from the coastal plain looking back at the lava flows on the pali. The two flows reaching the base of the pali are part of the flow lobe that followed Prince Avenue most of the way through the subdivision. The smoke at upper right is from the flow lobe that followed Royal Avenue through the subdivision. The remaining sliver of Royal Avenue, just above and to the right of photo center, will likely be consumed before tomorrow.Right.View of an `a`a flow moving through vegetation. What else can be said? Lava. Fire. Pretty.

25 February 2008

Main lava streams cutting through Royal Gardens subdivision

View of the upper of two main lava streams cutting through the Royal Gardens subdivision. This portion of the subdivision was buried by lava flows in the 1980's and early 1990's.
The terminus of the upper stream was burning asphalt on an exposed sliver of Prince Avenue, hence the dark gray smoke in this picture.
Left.View of the upper of two main lava streams cutting through the Royal Gardens subdivision. This portion of the subdivision was buried by lava flows in the 1980's and early 1990's.Right.The terminus of the upper stream was burning asphalt on an exposed sliver of Prince Avenue, hence the dark gray smoke in this picture.
View of the upper end of the lower of the two main lava streams in Royal Gardens. This flow was following Royal Avenue down-slope.
Looking back upslope at the lower lava stream in Royal Gardens. The terminus of the resulting `a`a flow, stalled in this photo, is at lower left. The active front of the flow is marked by the smoke. The cross street visible in the photo is Pikake Street.
Left.View of the upper end of the lower of the two main lava streams in Royal Gardens. This flow was following Royal Avenue down-slope. Right. Looking back upslope at the lower lava stream in Royal Gardens. The terminus of the resulting `a`a flow, stalled in this photo, is at lower left. The active front of the flow is marked by the smoke. The cross street visible in the photo is Pikake Street.

22 February 2008

TEB flow field, Royal Gardens subdivision, huge collapses, forested Kalalua, and Pu`u Kia`i

View to the north at the TEB flow field with Mauna Kea in the distance. The multi-fingered front of the active flow is the black lava just right of center frame. This flow has only weak activity, and faint smoke can be seen emanating from the southeast-most active terminus, also just right of center. The upper roads of the Royal Gardens subdivision can be seen at lower left.
Several collapses have occurred in the past week on the TEB rootless shields. The two visible here are on the flank of the TEB shield, just down-tube from the TEB vent (fuming profusely). The heaviest fume is also coming from a recent collapse. The black lava at the bottom of the nearest hole is the recently crusted surface of the lava stream in the tube (compare to photo 20080219-2997-TRO from February 19).
Left.View to the north at the TEB flow field with Mauna Kea in the distance. The multi-fingered front of the active flow is the black lava just right of center frame. This flow has only weak activity, and faint smoke can be seen emanating from the southeast-most active terminus, also just right of center. The upper roads of the Royal Gardens subdivision can be seen at lower left.Right.Several collapses have occurred in the past week on the TEB rootless shields. The two visible here are on the flank of the TEB shield, just down-tube from the TEB vent (fuming profusely). The heaviest fume is also coming from a recent collapse. The black lava at the bottom of the nearest hole is the recently crusted surface of the lava stream in the tube (compare to photo 20080219-2997-TRO from February 19).
View to the southwest at the most vigorous part of the flow field-active lava crawling to the northeast and wrapping around Kalalua. The shiny pad of lava just above and to the left of center is not connected to the active lava just behind it. Lava from the more distant flow entered an old lava tube and reemerged a few hundred meters away to form the nearer flow.
View to the northeast, almost opposite to the previous photo, of the pad of lava separated from the main body of the flow. Pu`u Kia`i is the barren cone visible at top right; Kalalua is the forested cone on the left side of the photo.
Left.View to the southwest at the most vigorous part of the flow field-active lava crawling to the northeast and wrapping around Kalalua. The shiny pad of lava just above and to the left of center is not connected to the active lava just behind it. Lava from the more distant flow entered an old lava tube and reemerged a few hundred meters away to form the nearer flow.Right.View to the northeast, almost opposite to the previous photo, of the pad of lava separated from the main body of the flow. Pu`u Kia`i is the barren cone visible at top right; Kalalua is the forested cone on the left side of the photo.

20 February 2008

Pahoehoe lava flow reaches Royal Gardens subdivision

View looking northwest at the lowest lobe of pahoehoe lava advancing into the upper reaches of the Royal Gardens subdivision. The terminus is the just below the small forested kipuka in the dead center of the photo. The flow has advanced about 270 meters (yards) in the last 24 hours. Pu`u `O`o is at top left.
View to the west looking at active and recent pahoehoe of the lava flow atop the pali above Royal Gardens. This is the broadest part of the flow, where most of the active lava from this flow is slowly creeping downhill. The fingers in the foreground, however, are stagnant.
Left.View looking northwest at the lowest lobe of pahoehoe lava advancing into the upper reaches of the Royal Gardens subdivision. The terminus is the just below the small forested kipuka in the dead center of the photo. The flow has advanced about 270 meters (yards) in the last 24 hours. Pu`u `O`o is at top left.Right.View to the west looking at active and recent pahoehoe of the lava flow atop the pali above Royal Gardens. This is the broadest part of the flow, where most of the active lava from this flow is slowly creeping downhill. The fingers in the foreground, however, are stagnant.

19 February 2008

Lava entering kipuka, TEB flow approaching Royal Gardens, awesome skylight, lava stalactites, deep depths, and aerial view into another collapsed rootless shield

View to the northeast of lava entering a small kipuka. Pu`u `O`o fumes profusely in the background. The less prominent fume plume from the TEB vent is in the background just right of center. The snow-clad summit of Mauna Loa can be seen in the distance between Pu`u `O`o and the TEB vent.
Lava entering the kipuka was igniting trees and brush. Fire and smoke were accompanied by the near continuous booms of small methane explosions.
Left. View to the northeast of lava entering a small kipuka. Pu`u `O`o fumes profusely in the background. The less prominent fume plume from the TEB vent is in the background just right of center. The snow-clad summit of Mauna Loa can be seen in the distance between Pu`u `O`o and the TEB vent. Right. Lava entering the kipuka was igniting trees and brush. Fire and smoke were accompanied by the near continuous booms of small methane explosions.
View to the north looking at the terminus of the multi-fingered front of pahoehoe lava from the TEB flow approaching the Royal Gardens Subdivision. The upper subdivision street, `Ekaha, is in the foreground.
Side-view into a skylight on a lava tube near the southeastern end of the TEB rootless shields. The length of the stream in this picture is about 30 feet, and is flowing from right to left.
Left.View to the north looking at the terminus of the multi-fingered front of pahoehoe lava from the TEB flow approaching the Royal Gardens Subdivision. The upper subdivision street, `Ekaha, is in the foreground. Right. Side-view into a skylight on a lava tube near the southeastern end of the TEB rootless shields. The length of the stream in this picture is about 30 feet, and is flowing from right to left.
Close-up view of the upstream (right) side of the skylight shown above.
Close-up view of the downstream (left) side of the skylight shown above. Note the lava stalactites hanging from the tube ceiling. The ends of the longer stalactites were flexible and wafting in the breeze created by heat billowing from the skylight.
Left.Close-up view of the upstream (right) side of the skylight shown above. Right.Close-up view of the downstream (left) side of the skylight shown above. Note the lava stalactites hanging from the tube ceiling. The ends of the longer stalactites were flexible and wafting in the breeze created by heat billowing from the skylight.
This near vertical view into certain death provides reason enough to stay off the top of the TEB rootless shields. The tops of several of the shields have collapsed in the last several days revealing the furnace-like cavities hidden beneath thin crusts. This opening is about 20 feet across, and the bottom is probably about 100 feet down.
An aerial view into the collapsed top of another rootless shield. The TEB vent is at the top of the photo, and the lava in the skylight is flowing toward the bottom of the photo. The skylight is probably about 30 feet across.
Left.This near vertical view into certain death provides reason enough to stay off the top of the TEB rootless shields. The tops of several of the shields have collapsed in the last several days revealing the furnace-like cavities hidden beneath thin crusts. This opening is about 20 feet across, and the bottom is probably about 100 feet down. Right.An aerial view into the collapsed top of another rootless shield. The TEB vent is at the top of the photo, and the lava in the skylight is flowing toward the bottom of the photo. The skylight is probably about 30 feet across.

15 February 2008

TEB fume source, rootless shield 6, and snowed-capped Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa

The summit of Kupaianaha fills the lower half of the photo. The TEB vent is the prominent fume source at middle right, and the rootless shields and active lava tube extend to the left across the center of the photo. Pu`u `O`o is at the upper right.
The TEB vent and flow field is the dark-colored lava at upper left. The dark-colored, narrow flow that crosses vertically through the center of the photo was sourced from rootless shield 6 (see map) and was emplaced over the last couple of days. Its front was stagnant, or nearly so, by the time this photo was taken. The snowy summit of Mauna Kea is in the background.
Left.The summit of Kupaianaha fills the lower half of the photo. The TEB vent is the prominent fume source at middle right, and the rootless shields and active lava tube extend to the left across the center of the photo. Pu`u `O`o is at the upper right. Right.The TEB vent and flow field is the dark-colored lava at upper left. The dark-colored, narrow flow that crosses vertically through the center of the photo was sourced from rootless shield 6 (see map) and was emplaced over the last couple of days. Its front was stagnant, or nearly so, by the time this photo was taken. The snowy summit of Mauna Kea is in the background.
Rootless shield 6 continues to feed a kilometer-long flow. This is the upper, channelized portion of the flow. Pu`u `O`o is in the background. The snow covered summit of Mauna Loa is beyond Pu`u `O`o in the background
Geologist Matt Patrick collects a lava sample from the front of an advancing sheet flow on the east side of the TEB flow field.
Left.Rootless shield 6 continues to feed a kilometer-long flow. This is the upper, channelized portion of the flow. Pu`u `O`o is in the background. The snow covered summit of Mauna Loa is beyond Pu`u `O`o in the background.Right.Geologist Matt Patrick collects a lava sample from the front of an advancing sheet flow on the east side of the TEB flow field.

8 February 2008

Overflows to Kahauale'a, new shield, and shiny active lava

Overflows from the perched channel and the TEB vent reached the base of the forested cone of Kahauale'a. The TEB shield and perched channel comprise the dark colored mound framed by steam in the upper left quadrant of the photo. A hint of incandescence can be seen at the TEB vent, and the perched channel is just beginning to overflow again.
In less than half an hour, the TEB vent was overflowing again and sending flows downhill back toward Kahauale'a.
Left.Overflows from the perched channel and the TEB vent reached the base of the forested cone of Kahauale'a. The TEB shield and perched channel comprise the dark colored mound framed by steam in the upper left quadrant of the photo. A hint of incandescence can be seen at the TEB vent, and the perched channel is just beginning to overflow again. Right.In less than half an hour, the TEB vent was overflowing again and sending flows downhill back toward Kahauale'a.
Shield 5, the new shield southeast of shield 4, hosted large flows today. Despite the large amount of lava erupting, the flows were not traveling very far. It is likely that a perched pond will develop of the shield.
With the development of the TEB rootless shields, Kupaianaha (the brown lava at upper right) no longer stands out prominently. The shiny active lava from shield 5 stands out just above and to the right of center, and the rest of the rootless shields define the low ridge extending back toward the top center of the photo. Pu'u 'O'o  is at top left.
Left.Shield 5, the new shield southeast of shield 4, hosted large flows today. Despite the large amount of lava erupting, the flows were not traveling very far. It is likely that a perched pond will develop of the shield.Right.With the development of the TEB rootless shields, Kupaianaha (the brown lava at upper right) no longer stands out prominently. The shiny active lava from shield 5 stands out just above and to the right of center, and the rest of the rootless shields define the low ridge extending back toward the top center of the photo. Pu'u 'O'o is at top left.

7 February 2008

TEB, rootless shield tube system, perched channel, and visible/infrared view

View into the TEB vent. The level was very low today, and the lava stream could be seen plunging down into the rootless shield tube system deep below stranded remnant of pond crust.
The huge pond on top of rootless shield 4 was inactive today (compare to last week's photos). Emptying of the pond to construct a new shield to the southeast of shield 4 caused the crusted pond surface to sag and drop down several meters.
Left.View into the TEB vent. The level was very low today, and the lava stream could be seen plunging down into the rootless shield tube system deep below stranded remnant of pond crust. Right.The huge pond on top of rootless shield 4 was inactive today (compare to last week's photos). Emptying of the pond to construct a new shield to the southeast of shield 4 caused the crusted pond surface to sag and drop down several meters.
At around noon today, lava began to erupt again in pool 1 of the perched channel. This photo, taken shortly after the activity began, shows the breakout point and rapidly advancing flow within pool 1.
30 minutes after the previous photo, lava had traveled about 325 m and was overflowing the west side of the channel.
Left.At around noon today, lava began to erupt again in pool 1 of the perched channel. This photo, taken shortly after the activity began, shows the breakout point and rapidly advancing flow within pool 1.Right.30 minutes after the previous photo, lava had traveled about 325 m and was overflowing the west side of the channel.
Lava flows fed from the new shield (shield 5) were narrow and slow moving. The adjacent thermal image shows the active and recently active flows on shield 5.
Lava flows fed from the new shield (shield 5) were narrow and slow moving. The adjacent thermal image shows the active and recently active flows on shield 5.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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Updated: 29 February 2008 (pnf)