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Images and Chronology
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20 May 2009

Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u aerial views

Aerial view of the Waikupanaha (left) and Kupapa`u (right) ocean entries.
 Aerial view of the Waikupanaha delta.
Left. Aerial view of the Waikupanaha (left) and Kupapa`u (right) ocean entries. Right. Aerial view of the Waikupanaha delta.

29 April 2009

A new skylight and the Kupapa`u delta continues to build

A new skylight provides a view into one of the two major lava tubes on the coastal plain.  Although only the incandescent tube walls can be seen in this photo, another vantage point provided a partial view of the flowing lava stream.
 The Kupapa`u delta continues to build.  This portion of the delta expanded about 30 yards eastward since last week's field visit.  A small lava stream could be seen at the front edge of the delta today, but no littoral explosions were observed.
Left. A new skylight provides a view into one of the two major lava tubes on the coastal plain. Although only the incandescent tube walls can be seen in this photo, another vantage point provided a partial view of the flowing lava stream. Right. The Kupapa`u delta continues to build. This portion of the delta expanded about 30 yards eastward since last week's field visit. A small lava stream could be seen at the front edge of the delta today, but no littoral explosions were observed.

22 April 2009

Kupapa`u ocean entry breakouts and littoral explosions

Minor breakouts of pahoehoe were active on the coastal plain, a short distance inland from the Kupapa`u entry.
 Another breakout near the Kupapa`u entry.
Left. Minor breakouts of pahoehoe were active on the coastal plain, a short distance inland from the Kupapa`u entry. Right. Another breakout near the Kupapa`u entry.
Small littoral explosions have been common at the Kupapa`u entry, building the steep-sided littoral cone visible at the right side of the image.
 The plume from the Waikupanaha ocean entry, at left, emanates from in front of the littoral cone and drifts west.  About 0.6 miles west of Waikupanaha, the Kupapa`u entry, at right, creates its own plume.
Left. Small littoral explosions have been common at the Kupapa`u entry, building the steep-sided littoral cone visible at the right side of the image. Right. The plume from the Waikupanaha ocean entry, at left, emanates from in front of the littoral cone and drifts west. About 0.6 miles west of Waikupanaha, the Kupapa`u entry, at right, creates its own plume.

17 April 2009

Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u ocean entries remain active and developed shatter ring

The two major ocean entries remain active.  The Waikupanaha entry, on the left, was producing a substantial plume today while the Kupapa`u entry, on the right, was less vigorous.
The Waikupanaha delta has experienced repeated breakouts, collapses and other changes over the past year.  During the past week, a 'shatter ring' - the circular rampart of rubble visible in the center of the delta - developed.  Shatter rings result from repeated, piston-like movement of the roof of an active lava tube, due to fluctuations in flow rate through the tube.  A timelapse movie from 2006, from another area of the flow field, shows how shatter rings behave.
Left. The two major ocean entries remain active. The Waikupanaha entry, on the left, was producing a substantial plume today while the Kupapa`u entry, on the right, was less vigorous. Right. The Waikupanaha delta has experienced repeated breakouts, collapses and other changes over the past year. During the past week, a 'shatter ring' - the circular rampart of rubble visible in the center of the delta - developed. Shatter rings result from repeated, piston-like movement of the roof of an active lava tube, due to fluctuations in flow rate through the tube. A timelapse movie from 2006, (shown below) from another area of the flow field, shows how shatter rings behave.

The feature seen here is called a shatter ring. (click on image to view movie)

To download, right-click the image and choose "Save Link As...".

East Lae`apuki Shatter Ring (1.0 MB)
October 16 , 2006 06:20:23 to 08:00:22
(2 hours 19 minutes and 59 seconds -- 1 frame per minute)

The feature seen here is called a shatter ring. It is a circular rampart of broken rock that forms over a lava tube when lava pressure in the tube repeatedly exceeds the strength of the overlying rock. Repeated flexing of the lava-tube roof breaks the rock around the edges of the mobile area. This shatter ring was active from late September to mid-October 2006, and, in this sequence, was about 55 m long and and 2.5 m high. The center of the shatter ring, which is not visible here, was about a meter lower than the lava surface outside the shatter ring. Thus, the center of the shatter ring uplifted about 5 meters during this event. Lava emerging from the base of the shatter ring is evidence of the overpressurization of the lava tube.

2 April 2009

Heavy-fumed Pu`u `Ō `ō crater, and the Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u entries

Views into Pu`u `Ō `ō crater continue to be obscured by heavy fume, allowing only partial views into the crater when the fume temporarily clears.
The Waikupanaha (left) and Kupapa`u (three plumes on right) entries continue producing sizeable steam plumes, even though no surface flows were observed due to the deflation phase of the current DI event.
Left. Views into Pu`u `Ō `ō crater continue to be obscured by heavy fume, allowing only partial views into the crater when the fume temporarily clears. Right. The Waikupanaha (left) and Kupapa`u (three plumes on right) entries continue producing sizeable steam plumes, even though no surface flows were observed due to the deflation phase of the current DI event.
Over the past week, the Kupapa`u entry has widened substantially, adding several new entry points along the delta.
Over the past week, the Kupapa`u entry has widened substantially, adding several new entry points along the delta.

30 March 2009

Quicktime movie of Halema`uma`u vent

This Quicktime movie shows recent activity observed within the Halema`uma`u vent with a thermal camera.  The video speed is approximately x30.  Cycles of filling and draining of the lava lake have been observed throughout much of the past week, following a collapse in the vent on March 25.  Filling-draining frequencies have ranged from about 10 to 20 cycles per hour.  A brief period of steady behavior, with no significant lava level fluctuations, was observed around midday on March 28.
This Quicktime movie shows recent activity observed within the Halema`uma`u vent with a thermal camera. The video speed is approximately x30. Cycles of filling and draining of the lava lake have been observed throughout much of the past week, following a collapse in the vent on March 25. Filling-draining frequencies have ranged from about 10 to 20 cycles per hour. A brief period of steady behavior, with no significant lava level fluctuations, was observed around midday on March 28.

26 March 2009

Ash-covered webcam and radiometer from Halema`uma`u overlook vent

A webcam and radiometer were caked with ash after a collapse in the Halema`uma`u overlook vent and accompanying ash event on March 15, 2008.  Ash was also found on signs and other smooth surfaces at the Sulphur Banks area in the National Park.
A webcam and radiometer were caked with ash after a collapse in the Halema`uma`u overlook vent and accompanying ash event on March 15, 2008. Ash was also found on signs and other smooth surfaces at the Sulphur Banks area in the National Park.

Several small steam plumes at Kupapa`u ocean entry

Minor activity at the Kupapa`u ocean entry created several small steam plumes along the margin of the lava delta.
Minor activity at the Kupapa`u ocean entry created several small steam plumes along the margin of the lava delta.

25 March 2009

Quicktime robust brown plume movie

This Quicktime movie shows the robust brown plume associated with a hybrid seismic event at 11:03 am.  Brown plumes such as this have appeared occasionally throughout the past year of eruptive activity at the summit, and are often associated with rockfalls.
This Quicktime movie shows the robust brown plume associated with a hybrid seismic event at 11:03 am. Brown plumes such as this have appeared occasionally throughout the past year of eruptive activity at the summit, and are often associated with rockfalls.

19 March 2009

Low bench of the Waikupanaha ocean entry and the new Kupapa`u delta

The Waikupanaha entry continues to build a low bench out from the sea cliff.  Shore-parallel cracks attest to the instability of the delta, which has collapsed many times over the past year.  In the very upper left corner of the photograph, the new Kupapa`u delta is visible.
Looking east along the coast, the new and growing Kupapa`u delta can be seen in the foreground, fed by a western branch of the flow field.  In the distance, the Waikupanaha ocean entry - now active for over a year and situated near the eastern margin of the flow field - emits a moderate size plume.
Left. The Waikupanaha entry continues to build a low bench out from the sea cliff. Shore-parallel cracks attest to the instability of the delta, which has collapsed many times over the past year. In the very upper left corner of the photograph, the new Kupapa`u delta is visible. Right. Looking east along the coast, the new and growing Kupapa`u delta can be seen in the foreground, fed by a western branch of the flow field. In the distance, the Waikupanaha ocean entry - now active for over a year and situated near the eastern margin of the flow field - emits a moderate size plume.

11 March 2009

Perched lava channel before and after shots and thermal video of Halema`uma`u vent

A before and after shot of a recent collapse in pool 1 of the perched lava channel.  The small hole broken through the crust in the left photo is about 5 m (16 feet) across.  Within the last week, a 60 m (200 foot) portion of the crust over the lava pond collapsed.  The lava pond has crusted over and the collapse rubble can be seen on the crusted surface.  The photo on the left was taken on February 26, the photo on the right with a difference in view of almost 90 degrees, was taken on March 11.
A before and after shot of a recent collapse in pool 1 of the perched lava channel. The small hole broken through the crust in the left photo is about 5 m (16 feet) across. Within the last week, a 60 m (200 foot) portion of the crust over the lava pond collapsed. The lava pond has crusted over and the collapse rubble can be seen on the crusted surface. The photo on the left was taken on February 26, the photo on the right with a difference in view of almost 90 degrees, was taken on March 11.
This Quicktime movie shows a thermal video providing views into the Halema`uma`u vent.  At a depth of about 130 yards below the vent rim, there is a series of small puffing gas vents, and these occasionally throw small amounts of spatter into the air.  The configuration and geometry of these small puffing vents have been observed to change on a daily basis.  Much of the interior of the Halema`uma`u vent is filled with rubble from frequent collapses of the vent walls.
This Quicktime movie shows a thermal video providing views into the Halema`uma`u vent. At a depth of about 130 yards below the vent rim, there is a series of small puffing gas vents, and these occasionally throw small amounts of spatter into the air. The configuration and geometry of these small puffing vents have been observed to change on a daily basis. Much of the interior of the Halema`uma`u vent is filled with rubble from frequent collapses of the vent walls.

5 March 2009

Perched channel large opening, new time-lapse camera, and Waikupanaha entry

Active surface flow near the eastern National Park boundary.
The Waikupanaha delta has been mostly rebuilt since it partly collapsed on Saturday, February 28.
Left. Active surface flow near the eastern National Park boundary.Right. The Waikupanaha delta has been mostly rebuilt since it partly collapsed on Saturday, February 28.
The coastal plain remains active, with lava flowing through tubes and across the surface, as shown by this visible-thermal comparison.  The Waikupanaha entry, active since March 2008, was producing a modest plume today.  This entry is fed by a subsurface tube, which does not exhibit a large thermal signature.  Active surface flows, situated west of the Waikupanaha entry, are distinct in the thermal image.  Letters denote corresponding points of reference in the visible and thermal images.  Earlier surface flows created short-lived entries at Poupou and Waha`ula, which are now both inactive.
The coastal plain remains active, with lava flowing through tubes and across the surface, as shown by this visible-thermal comparison. The Waikupanaha entry, active since March 2008, was producing a modest plume today. This entry is fed by a subsurface tube, which does not exhibit a large thermal signature. Active surface flows, situated west of the Waikupanaha entry, are distinct in the thermal image. Letters denote corresponding points of reference in the visible and thermal images. Earlier surface flows created short-lived entries at Poupou and Waha`ula, which are now both inactive.

26 February 2009

Perched channel large opening, new time-lapse camera, and Waikupanaha entry

A large opening in the floor of pool 1 of the perched channel.  Below the crust is a large void and sluggish lava pond.  The pond occasionally overturns and hosts small bubble bursts.
A time-lapse camera is deployed on the rim of pool 1 to monitor changes in the lava level of the pond.
Left. A large opening in the floor of pool 1 of the perched channel. Below the crust is a large void and sluggish lava pond. The pond occasionally overturns and hosts small bubble bursts. Right. A time-lapse camera is deployed on the rim of pool 1 to monitor changes in the lava level of the pond.
The Waikupanaha ocean entry plume has resumed after two back to back DI events.  The entry reactivated around 7 pm last night (February 25).  Winds were incredibly strong, causing the plume to skim along the water and keep from lofting.
Small lava streams enter the ocean along the front of the Waikupanaha delta.
Left. The Waikupanaha ocean entry plume has resumed after two back to back DI events. The entry reactivated around 7 pm last night (February 25). Winds were incredibly strong, causing the plume to skim along the water and keep from lofting. Right. Small lava streams enter the ocean along the front of the Waikupanaha delta.

20 February 2009

New Poupou ocean entry, Waikupanaha entry and infrared image

The new ocean entry this week, situated at Poupou, consists of a single lobe of lava feeding a small but growing delta at the base of the sea cliff.
The Waikupanaha entry, active since March 2008, has built a lava delta out from the sea cliff.  Shore-parallel cracks, visible in this photograph, attest to the instability, and potential for collapse, of the delta.
Left. The new ocean entry this week, situated at Poupou, consists of a single lobe of lava feeding a small but growing delta at the base of the sea cliff. Right. The Waikupanaha entry, active since March 2008, has built a lava delta out from the sea cliff. Shore-parallel cracks, visible in this photograph, attest to the instability, and potential for collapse, of the delta.
The TEB tube system cuts through the middle of the Royal Gardens subdivision, and feeds both a steadily active ocean entry at Waikupanaha (out of view, to the right of the image) and an area of active breakouts on the coastal plain (center of the image).  This image shows the area of coastal plain breakouts, both in the visual (top) and infrared (bottom).  One lobe of the active breakouts is feeding a new entry at Poupou.  Earlier activity fed an entry at Waha`ula, which is now inactive.  Points A and B designate corresponding points of reference in the visual and infrared images.
The TEB tube system cuts through the middle of the Royal Gardens subdivision, and feeds both a steadily active ocean entry at Waikupanaha (out of view, to the right of the image) and an area of active breakouts on the coastal plain (center of the image). This image shows the area of coastal plain breakouts, both in the visual (top) and infrared (bottom). One lobe of the active breakouts is feeding a new entry at Poupou. Earlier activity fed an entry at Waha`ula, which is now inactive. Points A and B designate corresponding points of reference in the visual and infrared images.

18 February 2009

Ballistic field behind Waikupanaha ocean entry, and lava drips over cliff

An area of the ballistic field behind the Waikupanaha ocean entry.  The lava delta collapsed yesterday afternoon (February 17) and created explosions that threw pieces of the delta, along with fresh lava, up to 275 m (900 ft) inland from the ocean entry point.
A large piece of spatter that landed about 170 m (560 ft) inland from the ocean entry during the February 17 delta collapse.
Left. An area of the ballistic field behind the Waikupanaha ocean entry. The lava delta collapsed yesterday afternoon (February 17) and created explosions that threw pieces of the delta, along with fresh lava, up to 275 m (900 ft) inland from the ocean entry point.Right. A large piece of spatter that landed about 170 m (560 ft) inland from the ocean entry during the February 17 delta collapse.
Lava flows over the sea cliff creating a small steam plume and lava delta near the buried Poupou-Kauka West archeological site within the National Park.  The new entry, which is located between Waikupanaha and Waha`ula, began within the last day.
Close-up photo of the lava as it drips over the sea cliff and hardens like candle wax.
Left. Lava flows over the sea cliff creating a small steam plume and lava delta near the buried Poupou-Kauka West archeological site within the National Park. The new entry, which is located between Waikupanaha and Waha`ula, began within the last day. Right. Close-up photo of the lava as it drips over the sea cliff and hardens like candle wax.

New ocean entry Quicktime movie

This Quicktime movie shows the new ocean entry within the National Park, near the location of the buried Poupou-Kauka West archeological site.  The entry consists of a series of narrow lava cascades falling onto the rocks at the base of the sea cliff.
This Quicktime movie shows the new ocean entry within the National Park, near the location of the buried Poupou-Kauka West archeological site. The entry consists of a series of narrow lava cascades falling onto the rocks at the base of the sea cliff.

11 February 2009

Large plume from Waikupanaha ocean entry, and spatter and cow-pie lavas

The Waikupanaha ocean entry continued to produce a large plume as several streams of lava enter the ocean.  In the center of the photograph, a large crack has formed, running parallel with the coastline and cutting across a littoral cone on the delta.  This littoral cone was created in the past several weeks, and clearly shows the instability of lava deltas.
Spatter and cow-pie lava litter the area behind the Waikupanaha delta.  The shiny blobs are deposits from the recent periods of bubble bursting on February 9 and 10.  For more information and photos on this topic, go to our website at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/hazards/oceanentry/deltaexplosions/ and scroll down to the section on bubble bursts.
Left. The Waikupanaha ocean entry continued to produce a large plume as several streams of lava enter the ocean. In the center of the photograph, a large crack has formed, running parallel with the coastline and cutting across a littoral cone on the delta. This littoral cone was created in the past several weeks, and clearly shows the instability of lava deltas. Right. Spatter and cow-pie lava litter the area behind the Waikupanaha delta. The shiny blobs are deposits from the recent periods of bubble bursting on February 9 and 10. For more information and photos on this topic, go to our website at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/hazards/oceanentry/deltaexplosions/ and scroll down to the section on bubble bursts.

7 February 2009

Thermal imagery video of Halema`uma`u lava lake cycles

This video shows thermal imagery of the vent inside Halema`uma`u crater.  The lava surface, about 130 yards below the vent rim, is clearly visible and can be seen undergoing cycles of filling and drainback.  Filling phases entail a rapidly rising lava level with intense (and loud) spattering, followed by a gradual phase of lava draining back down the conduit.  These cycles are thought to be controlled by episodic gas accumulation and release in the conduit.  The thermal image sequence is sped up by a factor of 15.
This video shows thermal imagery of the vent inside Halema`uma`u crater. The lava surface, about 130 yards below the vent rim, is clearly visible and can be seen undergoing cycles of filling and drainback. Filling phases entail a rapidly rising lava level with intense (and loud) spattering, followed by a gradual phase of lava draining back down the conduit. These cycles are thought to be controlled by episodic gas accumulation and release in the conduit. The thermal image sequence is sped up by a factor of 15.

4-5 February 2009

Robust brown plume rises from the Halema`uma`u vent, billowing steam plume from the Waikupanaha ocean entry, and thermal Halema`uma`u images

A dense ashy plume rises from the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent at 12:59, likely caused by a rock fall inside the vent on February 4.
A close up of the ash event on February 4.  The collapse probably reopened the vent which has been largely blocked by rubble since early December.
Left. A dense ashy plume rises from the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent at 12:59, likely caused by a rock fall inside the vent on February 4. Right. A close up of the ash event on February 4. The collapse probably reopened the vent which has been largely blocked by rubble since early December.
The familiar large billowing steam plume from the Waikupanaha ocean entry has diminished to minor puffs of steam after the onset of a DI event on February 3.  The orange dot in the center of the photo is a single stream of lava entering the ocean.
Two small streams of lava are seen on the Waha`ula delta in the National Park.  Due to the February 3 DI event, the entry plume was drastically reduced to wisps of steam.
Left. The familiar large billowing steam plume from the Waikupanaha ocean entry has diminished to minor puffs of steam after the onset of a DI event on February 3. The orange dot in the center of the photo is a single stream of lava entering the ocean. Right. Two small streams of lava are seen on the Waha`ula delta in the National Park. Due to the February 3 DI event, the entry plume was drastically reduced to wisps of steam.
The Halema`uma`u vent was again obscured to the naked eye by fume today, as shown by the photograph.  Thermal images acquired on today's overflight, however, could 'see' through the fume, and revealed changes within the vent that occurred during the morning.  On the early morning pass of the vent, at 8:49 am, a deep opening could be seen within the vent, extending to even greater depths.  On the early afternoon pass, at 1:02 pm, this opening was filled with a crusted lava pond, indicating that lava had risen during the intervening period.  The lava surface is estimated at about 130 yards below the vent rim.
The Halema`uma`u vent was again obscured to the naked eye by fume today, as shown by the photograph. Thermal images acquired on today's overflight, however, could 'see' through the fume, and revealed changes within the vent that occurred during the morning. On the early morning pass of the vent, at 8:49 am, a deep opening could be seen within the vent, extending to even greater depths. On the early afternoon pass, at 1:02 pm, this opening was filled with a crusted lava pond, indicating that lava had risen during the intervening period. The lava surface is estimated at about 130 yards below the vent rim.

3 February 2009

Active scattered breakouts on coastal plain feeds Waha`ula ocean entry

Scattered breakouts remained active on the coastal plain, within and near the National Park boundary, with one lobe feeding the Waha`ula ocean entry (not shown).
Scattered breakouts remained active on the coastal plain, within and near the National Park boundary, with one lobe feeding the Waha`ula ocean entry (not shown).

Small vigorous breakout pushes out large section of the flow front

An inflated flow front, about 1.5 yards in thickness, gives way and releases a gush of very fluid lava from its interior.  This small but vigorous breakout occurred when pressurized lava within the flow created fractures at the margin, and then pushed out a large section of the flow front as a single block (about 2 yards wide).  As the block fell down, fluid lava then spilled out from behind it, creating a thin, fast-moving flow which partially buried the block.  This image sequence covers about five minutes.
An inflated flow front, about 1.5 yards in thickness, gives way and releases a gush of very fluid lava from its interior. This small but vigorous breakout occurred when pressurized lava within the flow created fractures at the margin, and then pushed out a large section of the flow front as a single block (about 2 yards wide). As the block fell down, fluid lava then spilled out from behind it, creating a thin, fast-moving flow which partially buried the block. This image sequence covers about five minutes.

29 January 2009

Lava falls and a small lava delta at the new Waha`ula ocean entry

Lava flows drip over the sea cliff creating several lava falls at the new Waha`ula ocean entry.
A stream of lava pours into the sea, building a small lava delta at Waha`ula.
Left. Lava flows drip over the sea cliff creating several lava falls at the new Waha`ula ocean entry. Right. A stream of lava pours into the sea, building a small lava delta at Waha`ula.

22 January 2009

Halema`uma`u Overlook vent obscured and a visible lava stream at Waikupanaha

Despite two small rim collapses on Sunday, January 18, the view into the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent is still obscured by fume. The vent is now 377 feet (115 meters) across.
A lava stream is visible pouring into the ocean from the center of the Waikupanaha delta.  Several points of entry along the delta create a large billowing steam plume.
Left. Despite two small rim collapses on Sunday, January 18, the view into the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent is still obscured by fume. The vent is now 377 feet (115 meters) across. Right. A lava stream is visible pouring into the ocean from the center of the Waikupanaha delta. Several points of entry along the delta create a large billowing steam plume.

Draping lava reaches the ocean at Waha`ula

Lava finally reaches the ocean inside the national park at Waha`ula.  The entry began sometime between the evening of January 21 and the morning of January 22, 2009. The shiny flow in the center of the photo is the active branch of the TEB flow that made it to the ocean.
A closer view of the new ocean entry at Waha`ula.  Lava drapes over the sea cliff and creates a small amount of steam where it is dripping into the ocean.
Left. Lava finally reaches the ocean inside the national park at Waha`ula. The entry began sometime between the evening of January 21 and the morning of January 22, 2009. The shiny flow in the center of the photo is the active branch of the TEB flow that made it to the ocean. Right. A closer view of the new ocean entry at Waha`ula. Lava drapes over the sea cliff and creates a small amount of steam where it is dripping into the ocean.
A narrow finger of lava cascades over the sea cliff into the ocean at Waha`ula.  The corresponding thermal image on the right highlights the contrast of the active lobe.
A narrow finger of lava cascades over the sea cliff into the ocean at Waha`ula. The corresponding thermal image on the right highlights the contrast of the active lobe.
On the left, a thermal image taken from a helicopter on December 31 shows relatively cool temperatures inside the vent, during a period of reduced vent activity.  Vent glow, ash production and gas-rushing sounds have reappeared this week—after a six week pause—and this increase in activity is shown by the new hot source within the conduit (measured at about 90-100 yards below the rim).
On the left, a thermal image taken from a helicopter on December 31 shows relatively cool temperatures inside the Halema`uma`u vent. Vent glow, ash production and gas-rushing sounds have reappeared this week—after a six week pause—and this increase in activity is shown by the new hot source within the conduit (measured at about 90-100 yards below the rim).

14 January 2009

Pu`u `Ō `ō fuming line sources, and cool views of snow-capped Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, and the Halema`uma`u plume in background

Winds from the west push the plume from Pu`u `Ō `ō crater towards the east.  The line of fuming sources to the right of, and beyond, Pu`u `Ō `ō originates from skylights and fume outlets in the TEB tube system.
In the foreground, Pu`u `Ō `ō's fume-filled crater marks the current center of activity on Kilauea's east rift zone.  In the upper right, the snow-capped summit of Mauna Kea is visible.  In the upper left, the broad snow-covered summit of Mauna Loa can be seen.  In this view, the summit of Kilauea is immediately below Mauna Loa's summit, and the Halema`uma`u plume is visible drifting to the northeast.
Left. Winds from the west push the plume from Pu`u `Ō `ō crater towards the east. The line of fuming sources to the right of, and beyond, Pu`u `Ō `ō originates from skylights and fume outlets in the TEB tube system. Right. In the foreground, Pu`u `Ō `ō's fume-filled crater marks the current center of activity on Kilauea's east rift zone. In the upper right, the snow-capped summit of Mauna Kea is visible. In the upper left, the broad snow-covered summit of Mauna Loa can be seen. In this view, the summit of Kilauea is immediately below Mauna Loa's summit, and the Halema`uma`u plume is visible drifting to the northeast.

Waikupanaha ocean entry's narrow stream of incandescent lava

Lava on the coastal plain marches slowly towards the ocean, with the currently active lava comprising the lighter colored areas emplaced over darker, older flows from the current eruption.  The narrow finger of recent lava at the far left of the photograph was a lobe that stalled to within about 150 yards of the coast.  In the center of the photograph, the shiny area indicates an active lava lobe, which is about 350 yards from the coast.
A close-up view of the lava delta at the Waikupanaha ocean entry reveals a narrow stream of incandescent lava entering the water.  Upon contact with the water, the fluid lava often breaks apart into globs that float on the surface for some time, creating the steam trails visible here.
Left. Lava on the coastal plain marches slowly towards the ocean, with the currently active lava comprising the lighter colored areas emplaced over darker, older flows from the current eruption. The narrow finger of recent lava at the far left of the photograph was a lobe that stalled to within about 150 yards of the coast. In the center of the photograph, the shiny area indicates an active lava lobe, which is about 350 yards from the coast. Right. A close-up view of the lava delta at the Waikupanaha ocean entry reveals a narrow stream of incandescent lava entering the water. Upon contact with the water, the fluid lava often breaks apart into globs that float on the surface for some time, creating the steam trails visible here.

8 January 2009

Active pahoehoe lobe

Scattered pahoehoe breakouts were active today on the coastal plain.  In the very upper left of the photograph, fuming is visible from the tubes supplying lava to the coastal plain flows.
An active pahoehoe lobe on its slow march to the ocean, just west of the current Waikupanaha ocean entry and its vigorous plume.  The white dot to the left of the ocean entry is an unoccupied structure that was surrounded by flows in August 2008.
Left. Scattered pahoehoe breakouts were active today on the coastal plain. In the very upper left of the photograph, fuming is visible from the tubes supplying lava to the coastal plain flows. Right. An active pahoehoe lobe on its slow march to the ocean, just west of the current Waikupanaha ocean entry and its vigorous plume. The white dot to the left of the ocean entry is an unoccupied structure that was surrounded by flows in August 2008.

Eruption-viewing opportunities change constantly, so refer to this page often. Those readers planning a visit to Kilauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes can get much useful information from Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.


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The URL of this page is http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/multimedia/archive/2009/2009_Jan-May.html
Contact: hvowebmaster@usgs.gov
Updated: 11 June 2009 (pnf)