HVO Photos & Video

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February 27, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow front

The leading tip of the June 27th flow remains stalled about 500 meters (550 yards) from Highway 130, but scattered breakouts remain active upslope of the stalled tip.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the leading portion of the June 27th flow. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image. In the thermal image, the active breakouts are visible as yellow and white pixels, and these areas are scattered upslope of the stalled tip of the flow.

Left: Another view of the leading tip of the June 27th flow, looking downslope towards Highway 130. Right: This photograph looks southeast at the fork in the June 27th flow that is just west of Kaohe Homesteads. The east branch (top portion of photo) crossed Apaʻa St. and entered Pāhoa in late October, and this branch is now inactive. The west branch (lower portion of photo) has headed towards areas at the north end of Pāhoa, and remains active.

Breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō remains active

The breakout on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō that began last weekend remains active, but has advanced only a minor distance over the past four days. The new breakout is visible as the light-colored area just to the right of the center of the photograph. Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater is in the upper left portion of the photograph.

Left: A closer look at some of the activity at the breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Right: An HVO geologist sets up a time-lapse camera to monitor the breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Clear views in Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater

This view looks north and shows Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Much of the original cone has been covered by subsequent lava flows, many of which poured out of the crater. Within the crater, a depression holds a number of smaller pits, some of which contain active lava ponds.

Left: This view looks west and shows the depression within Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater. This depression formed following the start of the June 27th lava flow. Right: A closer look at a glowing hole in the northeast pit in Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater. Recent overflows from the opening created the dark flows filling the bottom of the pit.

Left: This lava pond was active in the southern pit in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. The diameter of the lava pond was roughly 18 m (60 ft). Weak spattering was active on the pond margin. Right: A closer look at the hole in the northeast pit. An active, bubbling lava surface could be seen a couple meters (yards) below the rim.

February 23, 2015 — Kīlauea


Breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow front; new breakout at Puʻu ʻŌʻō

The leading tip of the June 27th lava flow remains stalled, but breakouts persist upslope of the stalled tip. Today, one of these breakouts (marked by the arrow) had advanced a short distance towards the north, reaching one of the fire break roads.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the inactive flow tip. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image on the right. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. Although active breakouts are absent at the inactive tip of the flow, breakouts are present roughly 450 m (490 yards) behind the tip, and are also scattered further upslope.

New breakout at Puʻu ʻŌʻō

This photograph looks east, and shows the breakout on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō that began over the weekend. The breakout, visible as the lighter colored region in the center of the photograph, occurred from the area of the June 27th vent (upper right portion of photograph).

Left: A small lobe of pāhoehoe on the new breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Right: A closer look at some of the activity on the new breakout on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

February 19, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow tip

The leading tip of the June 27th flow has been stalled for several weeks, but scattered breakouts have persisted upslope. On today's overflight, one of these breakouts was active south of the stalled tip and about 650 meters (0.4 miles) northwest of the Pāhoa transfer station.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the inactive flow tip. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image on the right. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. Although active breakouts are absent at the inactive tip of the flow, breakouts are present roughly 500 m (550 yards) behind the tip, and are also scattered further upslope.

Left: Another view of the leading portion of the June 27th flow. Persistent breakouts a short distance upslope of the stalled tip have resulted in widening of this section of the flow. Right: Another view of the leading portion of the June 27th flow, looking upslope. Pahoa Marketplace is in the lower right corner of the photograph. Mauna Loa can be seen near the top of the photograph.

Summit eruption continues

The winds today were carrying the gas plume from Halemaʻumaʻu towards the northeast. Volcano Village is in the bottom portion of the photograph and Mauna Loa is in the upper right.

February 10, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts continue upslope of stalled flow front

The leading tip of the June 27th flow has been stalled roughly 500 meters (550 yards) upslope of Highway 130 for several weeks, but breakouts have persisted upslope of this stalled tip. Today, the closest active breakout to the flow tip was roughly 300 meters (330 yards) upslope of the tip.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the inactive flow tip. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image on the right. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. Although active breakouts are absent at the inactive tip of the flow, breakouts are present just a short distance behind the tip, and are also scattered further upslope.

Left: Roughly 6 km (4 miles) upslope of the stalled tip of the flow, a small breakout was active at a major fork on the June 27th flow. The lobe extending off the top of the photograph entered Pāhoa in October, and is now inactive. The lobe extending off the left edge of the photograph is the currently active lobe. Right: A breakout was also active farther upslope, closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō. This breakout, visible as the light gray surface, has reached the forest boundary and triggered several small brush fires.

Summit eruption at Halemaʻumaʻu Crater continues

The summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater continues with relatively steady activity. Today, spattering was active along the south margin of the lava lake.

February 5, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow front

Although the leading tip of the flow remains stalled roughly 500 meters (550 yards) upslope of Highway 130, active breakouts persist a short distance upslope of the stalled tip. These active breakouts are evident as small smoke plumes on the flow margin, where lava is burning vegetation.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the inactive flow tip. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image on the right. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. Although active breakouts are absent at the inactive tip of the flow, breakouts are present just a short distance behind the tip, and are also scattered further upslope.

Left: This section of the flow, which has cut through forest west of Kaohe Homesteads, is relatively narrow. In the left portion of the photograph, the flow is slightly more than 100 meters (110 yards) wide. Right: Breakouts were also active in the upper portion of the flow field today. This pāhoehoe lava is flowing over ʻaʻā erupted from Puʻu ʻŌʻō in the 1980s.

A wider view of the breakout in the upslope portion of the June 27th flow. Active surface lava was about 3.5 km (2.2 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which can be seen in the upper left corner of the photograph.

Left: The pāhoehoe breakout northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō is seen here covering older (1980s) ʻaʻā. Many pieces of the old ʻaʻā clinker were surrounded by the solidifying pāhoehoe, and then lifted by the inflating flow surface. Right: This view looks west at Puʻu ʻŌʻō. In the lower left portion of the photograph, the circular perched lava pond that was active in early July can be seen. Just to the right of this perched lava pond, a line of white fume can be seen extending to the lower right corner of the image. This fume marks the path of the subsurface lava tube for the June 27th lava flow. The vent for the June 27th flow, and the start of the lava tube, is slightly below the center point of the photograph.

January 29, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow front

The leading tip of the June 27th flow has not advanced significantly over the past week, and remains roughly 500 meters (550 yards) upslope of Highway 130, west of the fire and police station. Breakouts persist upslope, however, and these areas of activity can be spotted in this photograph by small smoke plumes where the lava is burning vegetation on the flow margins.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the inactive flow tip. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image on the right. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. Although active breakouts are absent at the inactive tip of the flow, breakouts are present just a short distance behind the tip, and are also scattered further upslope.

Left: This photograph looks downslope, and shows the proximity of the flow front to the highway. Right: This photograph looks upslope along the ground crack system of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. A small breakout from the lava tube is burning forest just left of the center of the photograph. In the upper left, thick fume is emitted from Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Near the top of the photograph, the snow-covered peak of Mauna Loa can be seen.

Left: In the upslope portion of the June 27th flow field, a breakout was active north of the forested cone of Kahaualeʻa. Some of this lava was the "blue glassy" type of pāhoehoe, which often represents lava that has been stored within an inflated flow for several days. Right: A closer look at the blue glassy type of pāhoehoe, whose color stands out from the more typical black lava surface on the left side of the photo. For scale the photograph width is about two meters (yards).

January 26, 2015 — Kīlauea


Left: HVO geologist taking a gps waypoint of the leading edge of the June 27th flow, which consisted of a narrow, sluggish breakout during the afternoon. Right: One of many small breakouts on the surface of the June 27th flow immediately upslope of the leading edge. Many inflation features are present on the flow, including the tumulus in upper right.

January 22, 2015 — Kīlauea


Sluggish breakouts persist near leading tip of the June 27th flow

The June 27th flow remains active near its leading tip, with breakouts scattered in the distal portion of the flow. The leading tip has not advanced significantly over the past few days, and remains about 600 meters (0.4 miles) from Highway 130.

Left: This photograph looks north, and shows the position of the leading tip of the flow relative to Highway 130. The brown swaths cut through the forest are fire breaks, and the large brown area at the left side of the image is a recent burn scar. Right: A view looking upslope at the leading tip of the flow.

January 21, 2015 — Kīlauea


Sluggish activity at leading tip of the flow

The leading tip of the most distal active portion of the June 27th lava flow remains active, but consists of small, sluggish breakouts that have not advanced a significant distance during the past two days. The leading tip of the flow remains approximately 600 meters (0.4 miles) from Highway 130.

Left: Only a handful of small breakouts were active along the leading tip of the flow. Right: Looking downslope at the leading tip of the flow, which is surrounded by burned vegetation.

January 13, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow tip

The leading tip of the flow near Pahoa Marketplace remains stalled, but active breakouts persist a short distance upslope. Breakouts were active about 500 meters (0.3 miles) upslope of the stalled tip, and a portion of this activity on the north margin triggered a small brush fire.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the stalled flow tip. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. About 700 meters (0.4 miles) upslope of the stalled tip, a small lobe is expanding towards the north-northeast, and had triggered a small brush fire this morning. Breakouts were also active farther upslope, with another north-northeast advancing lobe about 2 km (1.2 miles) upslope of the stalled tip.

Left: A closer look at the leading edge of the north-northeast advancing lobe that was active about 2 km (1.2 miles) upslope of the stalled flow tip. This lobe has crossed a fire break, and a small brush fire was active along the flow margin. Right: A view of the leading edge of the flow, looking downslope towards Pahoa Marketplace and Highway 130. The brush fire was triggered along the edge of a small north-northeast advancing lobe that was active about 700 meters (0.4 miles) upslope of the stalled flow tip.

Left: This close-up view of an inactive portion of the flow margin shows the irregular surface relief created from pāhoehoe flow inflation. Right: Winds from the south provided a fairly clear view in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. At the right side of the photograph, a thick fume source is situated on the northeast rim of the crater.