HVO Photos & Video

Photo & Video Chronology

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September 1, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th lava flow continues advancing eastward, with lava plunging into another ground crack

This wide view, looking west, shows the position of the June 27th flow front relative to the nearby Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. The front of the flow is moving through thick forest, and its position can be seen by the plumes of smoke above the center of the photograph. Near these active surface flows, there was also steaming from a ground crack, resulting from lava deep in the crack. The farthest point of this steaming was 1.7 km (1.1 miles) west of the boundary of the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision.

The June 27th lava flow remains active at its leading edge, where lava is spreading out slowly into thick forest and also plunging into one of the many deep ground cracks that form Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. This Quicktime video shows the activity near the eastern edge of the flow. This swiftly moving stream of lava was about 2 meters (yards) wide, and was visible down to about 30 meters (100 feet) depth in the crack, where it disappeared from view.

The Quicktime video begins with a view of the steaming ground crack, where lava is moving deep within the crack. As the view rotates west, lava can be seen on the surface burning thick forest. Finally, the camera focuses on the eastern edge of the flow, where lava is plunging into the deep ground crack. This swiftly moving stream of lava was about 2 meters (yards) wide, and was visible down to about 30 meters (100 feet) depth in the crack, where it disappeared from view.

Left: Surface flows at the front of the June 27th flow continue slowly moving through thick forest, creating scattered brush fires. This view looks south, and the cone of Heiheiahulu is in the upper left. Right: Extending slightly beyond the lava flows on the surface, a steaming ground crack indicates that lava is continuing to move beneath the surface. The front of the surface flows is just above and to the right of the center point of the photograph, and the steaming ground crack runs along the vertical center line of the photograph. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen on the horizon in the upper left.

Left: Near the leading edge of the lava on the surface, there was a swiftly moving stream of lava pouring into a deep ground crack (see Quicktime videos above). Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at the top of the photograph. Right: A closer look at the stream of lava pouring into the deep ground crack. See Quicktime videos above.

August 29, 2014 — Kīlauea


Far end of June 27th lava flow reactivates, lava spills out of steaming crack

The steaming ground crack observed yesterday suggested that lava was close to the surface within the crack, and today lava in the crack reached the surface and began spilling out into the thick forest. The leading edge of the lava today was near the abandoned well site (cleared area at left). This farthest lava was about 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō (visible on horizon) and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve.

A closer view of the pad of lava that emerged from the ground crack earlier this week, which had renewed surface flows today. At the east end (upper left in photograph) of the lava pad new breakouts spilled into adjacent ground cracks, and lava was visible within the ground crack extending farther to the east (visible by line of smoke extending towards upper left portion of photo). Heiheiahulu is visible in the upper right.

Left: A wide view of the leading edge of the June 27th lava flow, looking east down Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The main body of the June 27th flow ends near the center of the photograph, where lava poured into a deep ground crack. After traveling along the ground crack, lava emerged at the surface earlier this week, creating an isolated pad of lava (where the thick smoke is just above the center of the photograph). This pad of lava had renewed surface activity today, with lava filling and spilling out of a ground crack extending farther to the east of the lava pad. Right: Another wide view of the leading edge of the June 27th lava flow, again looking east. This shows the east end of the isolated lava pad. The thick smoke originates from lava filling a deep ground crack up to the surface. The smoke partly obscures the abandoned well site.

At the site of the isolated pad of lava near the leading edge of the June 27th flow, renewed surface flows today resurfaced the existing lava flow and also spilled into nearby ground cracks. In this photograph, two large streams of lava plunge into a crack that is a couple meters (yards) wide.

At the far end of the lava-filled crack, lava spilled out towards the north a very short distance. In this view from a thermal camera, the small lobe of lava moving north is easily visible. The trees surrounding the crack show brighter colors as they are heated by the lava flow, but not to the point of combustion.

The vent for the June 27th lava flow is on the upper northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The vent area is now covered by lava, but the lava tube that carries lava to the flow front is easily visible by the line of blue-colored fume. In the lower right, two skylights can be seen.

August 28, 2014 — Kīlauea


Steaming extends northeast along ground crack, suggesting lava is advancing again along the crack

Steaming (center of photograph) was reported this morning east of the small pad of lava (just above center) that emerged from a ground crack this past week. This renewed progression of steaming suggests that lava is again continuing to advance beneath the surface, along these ground cracks. On our afternoon overflight, the farthest point of steaming was near an abandoned well site, which serves as a convenient landmark in this broad expanse of forest. The farthest steaming was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve. In the top portion of the photograph, numerous plumes of smoke originate from scattered surface flows burning vegetation. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen on the horizon.

This figure compares the photo above with an equivalent view from a thermal camera. The plumes of smoke mark the farthest active lava on the surface (small, scattered lobes of pāhoehoe), which are also shown as small hotspots in the thermal image. The pad of lava that emerged from the ground crack earlier this week was inactive at the surface but still quite warm (high temperature patch in center of image). East of this pad of lava, steaming (just below the center of the photograph) has appeared over the past day, suggesting that lava is continuing to advance below the surface along a ground crack. Direct views into the crack were not possible due to thick vegetation, but close views of the steaming areas with the thermal camera reveal temperatures up to 190 C (370 F). These high temperature are further evidence of lava moving through the crack.

A closer of the new steaming. The thick vegetation obscures direct views of the ground crack, and only a line of steaming and browned vegetation is evident at the surface.

Slow-moving pāhoehoe advances through thick forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The pāhoehoe lobes surround, and burn through, the base of the trees. By the time the trees topple over, the lava surface temperature has cooled sufficiently that the downed trees do not completely burn through, leaving a field of tree trunks on the recent lava surface. One tree in the center of the photograph is completely surrounded by active lava, and likely on the brink of toppling over.

Left: Another view of the lava expanding into the forest. Right: Closer to the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, one of several skylights provides a view of the flowing lava stream within the lava tube. This lava tube supplies lava from the vent to the active surface flows near the flow front.

August 27, 2014 — Kīlauea


Activity at flow front appears to stall but surface flows remain active behind flow front

The June 27th flow remains active, but surface flows at the very farthest reaches of the flow appear to have stalled today. The lava flow front consisted of an isolated pad of lava that emerged from a deep ground crack several days ago. Today, this pad of lava appeared inactive at the surface, with no sign obvious activity in the adjacent crack. On today's overflight, the farthest active surface flows were on the main body of the June 27th flow, and were 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, or about 6 km (3.7 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve.

A closer view of the southern lobe of the June 27th lava flow. Smoke plumes originate from active surface breakouts, the farthest today reached 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The spot at which this lobe plunged into a deep ground crack last week can be seen near the bottom of the photograph. In the upper right portion of the photograph, smoke originating from active breakouts on the northern lobe can be seen.

A comparison of the normal photograph (see above) of the south lobe of the June 27th flow with an equivalent view from the thermal camera. The thermal camera clearly shows the extent of the farthest active breakout, which was relatively small.

Left: Another view of the south lobe of the June 27th flow, which plunged into a deep ground crack last week (this spot is visible at the right side of the photograph). This wide view, looking west, also shows another deep crack nearby, a short distance to the south of the active flows (which are producing the smoke plumes). This immediate area contains many ground cracks, which are part of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the distance. Right: The isolated pad of lava that emerged from the deep ground crack several days ago did not have any active breakouts at the surface today, but incandescent lava could be seen in numerous cracks on the surface. This likely represents lava that had ponded within the flow and remains hot, but immobile.

August 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


Lava resurfaces along crack, continues advancing through thick forest

The leading edge of the June 27th lava flow plunged into a deep crack on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone last week, and lava within the crack remained hidden for several days. Over the past day, lava returned to the surface at a point slightly farther along the crack, creating a small island of lava surrounded by thick forest. The farthest tip of the flow today was 11.4 km (7.1 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.1 km (1.9 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve.

Left: A view of the small pad of lava that has emerged from the crack over the past day. The lava pad was about 800 m (0.5 miles) long, and was about 1.3 km (0.8 miles) east of the point where lava plunged into the crack. Right: Another view of the isolated pad of lava that has emerged from the crack. This view is towards the east, along the East Rift Zone. The spot at which lava flowed into the crack is to the west, out of view beyond the bottom of the photograph.

View of the pad of lava with the equivalent view from a thermal camera.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater remains partly obscured by thick fume. In particular, the northeastern portion of the crater (bottom left part of image) has recently been entirely obscured to the naked eye, but the thermal camera provides a clear view through the fume, revealing a small lava pond.

August 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th lava flow continues advancing northeast, with a portion entering a deep crack

This image shows a broad overview of activity at the front of the June 27th lava flow. Steaming in the lower-center portion of the photograph issues from a crack on the East Rift Zone. A portion of the lava flow has entered this crack, and the steaming extends out 1.4 km (0.9 miles) from the visible flow margin at the surface. Presumably, this steaming results from groundwater heated by lava deep within the crack. In the upper-right part of the image, a smoke plume originates from a more northerly lobe that is advancing through thick forest, triggering small brush fires. The vent for the June 27th lava flow is on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, the cone in the upper left part of the photo.

This Quicktime movie shows the southern front of the June 27th lava flow from Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Lava here has flowed into a deep crack on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The line of steam extending out from the visible flow margin at the surface is inferred to be caused by lava deep within the crack. This video also shows the lava stream beneath the flow surface, supplied by a lava tube, plunging into the crack.

Left: Looking west, this photo shows the far end of the steaming that extends out beyond the visible flow margin at the surface. Right: A closer look at one of the steam sources. The crack from which steam is issuing is not visible through the thick vegetation.

Left: A view looking east, near the front of the southern lobe that has entered the crack. Lava is inferred to be present in the deep crack beyond the visible margin of the flow, based on the line of steam sources as well as a vigorous cascade of lava seen in a skylight in the bottom portion of the photo. Right: A closer look at the lava stream plunging into the crack. The lava is fed from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō via a lava tube.

North of where lava is entering the crack, another lobe is pushing through thick forest, triggering small brush fires. The source of the smoke marks the front of this lobe, and Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen just above this spot.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater remains partly obscured by thick fume. The thermal camera today revealed that several lava ponds persist in their usual locations in the northeast and southeast portions of the crater floor.

August 14, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27 lava flow remains active in forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

The June 27 lava flow remains active as a narrow lobe pushing through thick forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, triggering small brush fires. This view is to the east, with the forested cone of Heiheiahulu partly obscured by the smoke plume from this angle. The flow front today was 8.7 km (5.4 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Left: The surface flows active at the front of the June 27 lava flow are fed from lava flowing through a lava tube. This collapse of a portion of the roof has produced a skylight, and a direct view of the fluid lava stream several meters (yards) beneath the surface. Right: A remarkable perched lava pond was active on the June 27 lava flow more than a month ago. On August 12 a small lava flow erupted from the rim of the inactive pond, with the flow presumably originating from fluid lava that remained in the perched pond interior. This type of flow is commonly erupted from perched lava ponds and small lava shields, and we informally refer to these as "seeps". The seeps have a characteristic spiny, toothpaste-like, flow texture. Today, this seep was inactive, but the flow interior remained incandescent. The front of this small flow can be seen at the top of the photograph.

Another skylight and view into the tube supplying lava to the front of the June 27 lava flow.

August 12, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27 flow continues advancing through forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

The June 27 flow remains active, and has advanced further into the forest over the past week. The flow front today was 8.5 km (5.3 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō (see "map" link above for current flow field map). The flow's continued brisk advance rate is likely related, in part, to its continued confinement by local topography. Today, the narrow flow front was within one of the many linear depressions (grabens) on the East Rift Zone. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the distance.

Left: Another view of the flow front, looking east. The small bump on the horizon, near the center of the photograph, is the forested cone of Heiheiahulu. Right: Portions of the June 27 lava flow continue to expand and cover older flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Left: Thick fume continues to obscure views into Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater with the naked eye. The thermal camera has proven useful recently to see the hidden activity, which includes several small lava ponds (see thermal image from the July 29 overflight, below). Right: A skylight reveals the fluid lava stream within the main tube on the June 27 lava flow. The recently active perched lava pond is in the upper left portion of the photograph.

A closer look into the skylight on the June 27 lava flow, revealing complex structure within the lava tube. The bright incandescent area is the fluid lava stream, which was slowly but steadily flowing through the tube.

August 10, 2014 — Kīlauea


Lava lake activity continues in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

The usual lava lake activity continues in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater with no major changes related to the recent hurricane. This afternoon the lake surface was about 40 meters (130 ft) below the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater, which has been typical over the past several weeks. Lake surface migration was from north to south (top of photo to bottom), and occasional gas bubbles were bursting through the crust.

August 6, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27 lava flow reaches forest boundary

The June 27 flow continues to advance at a brisk rate, and has reached the forest boundary over the past week. On today's overflight, thick plumes of smoke from burning vegetation partially obscured the flow front. See the "maps" link above for today's flow field map.

A wider view of the flow front, looking east. The June 27 flow is the lighter-colored lava passing through the center of the photograph.