HVO Photos & Video

Photo & Video Chronology

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January 26, 2015 — Kīlauea


Left: HVO geologist taking a gps waypoint of the leading edge of the June 27th flow, which consisted of a narrow, sluggish breakout during the afternoon. Right: One of many small breakouts on the surface of the June 27th flow immediately upslope of the leading edge. Many inflation features are present on the flow, including the tumulus in upper right.

January 22, 2015 — Kīlauea


Sluggish breakouts persist near leading tip of the June 27th flow

The June 27th flow remains active near its leading tip, with breakouts scattered in the distal portion of the flow. The leading tip has not advanced significantly over the past few days, and remains about 600 meters (0.4 miles) from Highway 130.

Left: This photograph looks north, and shows the position of the leading tip of the flow relative to Highway 130. The brown swaths cut through the forest are fire breaks, and the large brown area at the left side of the image is a recent burn scar. Right: A view looking upslope at the leading tip of the flow.

January 21, 2015 — Kīlauea


Sluggish activity at leading tip of the flow

The leading tip of the most distal active portion of the June 27th lava flow remains active, but consists of small, sluggish breakouts that have not advanced a significant distance during the past two days. The leading tip of the flow remains approximately 600 meters (0.4 miles) from Highway 130.

Left: Only a handful of small breakouts were active along the leading tip of the flow. Right: Looking downslope at the leading tip of the flow, which is surrounded by burned vegetation.

January 13, 2015 — Kīlauea


Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow tip

The leading tip of the flow near Pahoa Marketplace remains stalled, but active breakouts persist a short distance upslope. Breakouts were active about 500 meters (0.3 miles) upslope of the stalled tip, and a portion of this activity on the north margin triggered a small brush fire.

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the stalled flow tip. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. About 700 meters (0.4 miles) upslope of the stalled tip, a small lobe is expanding towards the north-northeast, and had triggered a small brush fire this morning. Breakouts were also active farther upslope, with another north-northeast advancing lobe about 2 km (1.2 miles) upslope of the stalled tip.

Left: A closer look at the leading edge of the north-northeast advancing lobe that was active about 2 km (1.2 miles) upslope of the stalled flow tip. This lobe has crossed a fire break, and a small brush fire was active along the flow margin. Right: A view of the leading edge of the flow, looking downslope towards Pahoa Marketplace and Highway 130. The brush fire was triggered along the edge of a small north-northeast advancing lobe that was active about 700 meters (0.4 miles) upslope of the stalled flow tip.

Left: This close-up view of an inactive portion of the flow margin shows the irregular surface relief created from pāhoehoe flow inflation. Right: Winds from the south provided a fairly clear view in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. At the right side of the photograph, a thick fume source is situated on the northeast rim of the crater.

January 6, 2015 — Kīlauea


Kīlauea's East Rift Zone lava flow still active

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow has not advanced any closer to Pahoa Marketplace, but is still active. Breakouts were also active near the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well site, and along the distal 3 km (2 miles) of the flow, where a narrow lobe has been advancing toward the north-northeast. The view is to the southwest.

This shows a comparison of a normal photograph with a thermal image of the flow front. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image. White and yellow pixels in the thermal image show areas of active breakouts. Although the leading tip of the flow has stalled, the thermal image shows that active breakouts are present a short distance upslope of the stalled tip.

Left: This view, looking northeast, shows the distal part of the flow, with the flow lobe behind Pahoa Marketplace to the right and the newer north-northeast advancing lobe to the left. The north-northeast lobe is following a drainage that leads to the steepest-descent path that crosses Highway 130 about 1 km (0.6 mi) south of the Makuʻu Farmer’s Market. The flow, however, is still 3.5 km (2.2 mi) upslope from that spot and moving slowly. Right: This photo shows a closer view of the narrow north-northeast advancing lobe about 2.5 km (1.6 mi) upslope from the Pahoa Markplace. The view is to the northwest.

December 30, 2014 — Kīlauea


No change in activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Left: A clear view today of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s summit revealed no significant change during the past week. The cross-sectional area of the active lava stream in the tube on the flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō was the same as measured on December 22, suggesting no change in lava discharge from the vent. The central crater at Puʻu ʻŌʻō formed over several days following the opening of eruptive fissures on June 27; the view is looking toward the west. The distance from the high point on the northwest rim to the south rim (cliff in top middle to lower left in this photo) is about 300 m (~980 ft). Right: Close view of incandescence in spatter cone within a pit at the northeast edge of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s crater (the smaller pit visible to the right side in the adjacent photograph). Note small flows that cover the floor of this small crater.

Slow-moving breakouts form new flow front

Left: Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow remains active upslope from the Pahoa Marketplace area, visible at lower right. The leading edge stalled on December 22, but breakouts just upslope widened the flow field and then overtook the flow front during the past few days. The new leading edge advanced the flow front about 150 m (165 yd) since December 27. The flow crossed the firebreak road on December 28. The new tip is 530 m (580 yd) upslope of the Pahoa Marketplace, and was itself stalled at the time the photo was taken. The view is to the southwest. Right: The leading part of the flow consisted of several small, active lobes this afternoon. The front of the lobe that crossed the firebreak was stalled, though breakouts were active about 50 m (55 yd) upslope. Another lobe (area of most visible smoke in center) was about 300 m (330 yd) upslope of the tip and 150 m (165 yd) upslope of the firebreak. A third lobe was 350 m (385 yd) upslope of the firebreak. The view is to the northeast.

This compares a normal photograph of the active flow front with a thermal image. The photograph has been cropped and rotated to approximate the perspective of the thermal image. The thermal image shows that small breakouts were present immediately behind the leading tip of the flow and farther upslope, indicated by the white and yellowish pixels.

December 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image shows breakouts active upslope of stalled flow front

This satellite image was captured on Thursday, December 25, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds. The yellow outline is the flow margin as mapped on Monday, December 22.

The image above shows a close-up of the June 27th lava flow in the area of Kaohe Homesteads and Pāhoa. Although the leading tip of the flow stalled earlier this week, active breakouts have persisted a short distance upslope of this stalled front. The image shows active breakouts (red pixels) roughly 150 meters (160 yards) upslope of the stalled tip, with additional breakouts scattered upslope.

This satellite image was captured on Thursday, December 25, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds. The yellow outline is the flow margin as mapped on Monday, December 22.

The image above shows the extent of the entire June 27th lava flow, from its vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō to the flow front near Pāhoa, and provides an overview of the distribution of active breakouts on the flow. Near the vent, an area of active breakouts is present about 3 km (2 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Farther downslope, breakouts are active in the area of ground cracks. Closer to the flow front, breakouts are scattered just uplslope of the stalled tip of the flow.

December 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


Scattered surface activity continues near flow front and farther upslope

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow remains active upslope from the Pahoa Marketplace area, visible at upper left, though activity has waned over the past week. The flow was very close to a firebreak road cut several months ago. The Pahoa Transfer Station is at upper right. The view is to the southeast.

This compares a normal photograph of the active flow front with a thermal image. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image. In the thermal image, white and yellow pixels show areas of active breakouts. The thermal image shows that small breakouts are present near the leading tip of the flow, and that many other breakouts are active upslope.

Left: A small, but fairly vigorous, breakout was active this afternoon about 1 km (0.6 miles) behind the tip of the flow. This is the narrowest part of the flow, with a width of about 30 m (33 yards). The smoke in the distance is from surface lava near the front of the flow. The view is to the northeast. Right: This photo shows a closer view of the picturesque breakout at the narrow section of the flow.

Left: Breakouts were also active much farther upslope. Leaks from the lava tube near the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well site (at left) have been active for a couple of weeks, and are slowly invading forest to the north. View is to the west-southwest. Right: A breakout from the lava tube has also been active on the upper part of the flow field near Puʻu ʻŌʻō since December 5. The smoke is from a narrow finger of lava burning lichen on an older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow. Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at upper right. The view is to the south-southwest.

December 21, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image shows distribution of active breakouts on June 27th lava flow

This satellite image was captured on Friday, December 19, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.

The upslope portion of the June 27th flow, near Puʻu ʻŌʻō, is obscured by clouds, but the downslope portion of the flow near Pāhoa is relatively cloud free. The image provides a clear view of the distribution of active breakouts on this downslope portion of the flow. Surface lava is active around the leading tip of the flow, marked as "active flow front", but a short distance upslope of the leading tip there is an absence of surface breakouts. About 1.5-2 km (0.9-1.2 miles) upslope of the leading tip of the flow, many scattered breakouts are present. This image emphasizes that activity on the June 27th flow is not limited to the flow front.

December 19, 2014 — Kīlauea


Leading tip of flow has slowed, but remains active

Left: Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow continues to advance downslope toward the Pahoa Marketplace. This photo is of a small breakout from the edge of the inflated flow several hundred meters (yards) back from the active front. Right: This photo gives the general appearance of the surface of the flow, looking upslope, where the flow is narrower on slightly steeper terrain. It is normal for trees within the flow path to not burn after they topple. By the time the trees fall over, the surface crust of the flow has cooled below their ignition temperature. The photo was taken about 350 m (380 yards) behind the tip of the flow. The flow was already inflated 2 to 3 meters (yards) at this location.