HVO Photos & Video

Photo & Video Chronology

Latest Entries | Search (2011 and newer) | Archive (2010 and older)

Note: Check the Photo Glossary or a good dictionary for any terms unfamiliar to you. Looking for media you could swear you saw here but can't find now? Check the Archive.

October 25, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th flow crosses Apaʻa Street

Left: The June 27th lava flow crossed Apaʻa Street / Cemetery Road at 3:50 AM, HST, Saturday morning, October 25, 2014. In this photo, which was taken at about 9 AM Saturday, the flow is moving from right to left, with burning asphalt visible along it's NW margin. A utility pole, far right, was surrounded by lava but remained standing at the time of the photo. The hope is that the protective insulation and cinder/cement barrier around the pole will prevent it from burning through. Right: At 11 AM Saturday, the June 27th flow was advancing down the grassy driveway that leads to the Pāhoa cemetery. This view is looking upslope towards Apaʻa Street along the cemetery driveway.

October 24, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th flow front approaches Cemetery Rd./Apaʻa St.

The June 27th flow remains active, and has advanced at an increased rate over the past two days. This afternoon (2 pm), the flow front was pushing ahead as a narrow lobe, and was just 135 m (150 yards) from Cemetery Rd./Apaʻa St. The vent for the June 27th flow is on Puʻu ʻŌʻō (top of photograph), which is nearly 19 km (12 miles) away.

Left: A wider view of the flow front, and its position relative to Pāhoa. This morning the flow front was 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from Pāhoa Village Road, as measured along a straight line. Pāhoa Village Road is at the bottom of the photograph. Right: A closer view of the flow front, which has split into two separate lobes. As of 2 PM, the flow was only 135 m (approximately 150 yards) from Cemetery Rd./Apaʻa St., which spans this photo. HELCO crews can be seen working to protect utility poles along the road.

Left: Another view of the two lobes that make up the flow front. Vehicles for scale. Right: Just upslope of the flow front, the flow can be seen here parallel to the dirt road. The flow in this section was only about 30 m (100 feet) wide.

Left: Another view of the flow front and Cemetery Rd./Apaʻa St., looking east. The flow front is entering an open pasture. Right: HVO geologists can be seen in the pasture mapping the flow front position.

Another view of the leading tip of the flow, as it moves into the open pasture.

A comparison of a normal photograph with a thermal image of the flow front. The white box shows the approximate area of the thermal image. The thermal image shows that high temperatures are concentrated around the leading tip of the flow, which is consistent with lava focused at the front to sustain a higher advance rate.

Left: This Quicktime movie shows a close-up view of the flow front, and its proximity to Cemetery Rd./Apaʻa St. The transfer station is also shown. Right: This Quicktime movie shows a wider view of the flow front, and pans to the right to show the flow's proximity to Pāhoa.

October 22, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th lava flow continues advancement towards northeast

Left: The June 27th lava flow remains active, and continues to advance towards the northeast along the northern boundary of Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. Over the past day, the leading edge of the flow has moved ahead as a narrow lobe, and covered part of a dirt road. The flow front today was 815 meters (0.5 miles) from Apaʻa St., as measured along a straight line. Right: A wider view of the flow front, showing its proximity to Apaʻa St. and the transfer station. The vent for the June 27th lava flow is on Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone, which can be seen in the upper right portion of the photograph. The residential area in the lower left corner is in the western portion of Pāhoa.

Left: A closer view of the flow front from the air, showing the narrow lobe of lava moving along the dirt road. Kaohe Homesteads is in the left side of the photograph. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper right. Right: Another view of the flow front, showing the numerous smoke plumes arising from active breakouts burning vegetation at the flow margin. Kaohe Homesteads is in the left side of the photograph.

A comparison of a normal photograph of the flow front with a thermal image. The white box shows the approximate extent of the thermal image. The thermal image shows that active breakouts (white and yellow areas) are focused along the narrow lobe at the leading edge of the flow, but are also scattered for about 2 km (1.2 miles) behind the flow front.

Left: A vertical view of the lava upslope from the flow front covering the dirt road. Right: A view of the flow front from the ground, showing the pāhoehoe lava slowly moving through thick vegetation and creating thick plumes of smoke. Frequent methane explosions were occurring. These result from the cooked vegetation releasing methane, which then ignites. The explosions can range from small puffs to loud cannon-like blasts, and are an additional hazard in the immediate area of the flow margin. More information on methane explosions can be found here: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/archive/2002/02_10_17.html

Left: An HVO geologist marks the coordinates of the flow front with a GPS unit. Right: HVO geologists walk over the surface of the flow to track surface breakouts along a portion of the flow margin, about a kilometer (0.6 miles) upslope of the flow front.

Left: This Quicktime movie provides an aerial overview of the flow front. Right: This Quicktime movie was captured at the flow front, and shows a small channelized portion of the pāhoehoe flow pouring over the dirt road embankment. Gas trapped within the flow is released via occasional small bubble bursts.

October 21, 2014 — Kīlauea


Satellite image shows update on flow activity

This satellite image was captured by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures, and show active lava. White areas are clouds.

The image shows that the flow remains active. Most active breakouts are focused near the flow front. These breakouts extend from the leading tip of the flow back to about 2 km (1.2 miles) behind the front. Several small breakouts are also active in the area where lava is moving through ground cracks. The June 27 vent is on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater contains several small hot spots (which are caused by several small incandescent holes on the crater floor). The newly cleared portion of Chain of Craters Road is also faintly visible near the coastline.

October 20, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th lava flow remains active

The June 27th lava flow remains active, with no significant advancement of the flow front since Friday, Oct 17. The flow is active along the northern boundary of Kaohe Homesteads subdivision, with brush fires along the flow margins creating thick plumes of smoke. The flow front today was 1.1 km (0.7 miles) from the closest point on Apaʻa St., as measured along a straight line. Although there has been little net advancement of the flow front over the past week, breakouts persist behind the flow front.

A comparison of a normal photograph of the flow front with a thermal image. Although the leading edge of the flow has advanced only a slight amount over the past week (about 100 m, or 110 yards), active portions behind the flow front have moved at a faster rate. Surface flows along the southern margin of the flow have advanced 575 m (630 yards) over the past week, and are now close to the leading edge of the flow. The thermal image shows that other breakouts are scattered behind the flow front.

Left: Upslope from the flow front, several breakouts are active around the crack system. These surface flows (marked by the smoke plumes) have filled in a ground crack that is immediately north of another crack. The southern crack, marked by the white dotted line, is the main crack that lava is traveling along below the surface. The lava is moving deep within this crack over a span of about 1.5 km (nearly one mile), before it surfaces at a pad of lava visible at the bottom of the photograph. Right: Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater remains filled with thick fume, but recent views with the naked eye and thermal camera confirm that little change has occurred in the crater over recent weeks. The fume masks a handful of small incandescent openings on the crater floor.

Small explosion of spatter from the lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

Left: A collapse of rock from the wall of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater occurred yesterday (Sunday, October 19) around 1:15 am, with rocks impacting the lake and triggering an explosion of spatter. The scar left by this collapse is visible as the light-colored area marked in the photo. The spatter fell around the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook, which is within an area closed to the public due to hazards like this. For scale, the lava lake is about 160 m (175 yards) wide from this angle. Right: This Quicktime movie shows the small explosion of spatter that occurred at Halemaʻumaʻu on Sunday, October 19. Spatter landed around the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook (closed to the public).

October 17, 2014 — Kīlauea


Very little advancement of the flow's leading edge, but breakouts persist around flow front

The June 27th lava flow remains active, but has advanced only a minor distance - about 50 m (55 yards) - over the past two days. Activity persists around the flow front, however, with numerous scattered breakouts. The flow front this morning was 1.1 km (0.7 miles) from Apaʻa St., as measured along a straight line.

Left: Another view of the flow front, looking downslope towards Pāhoa. The smoke plumes are created by individual breakouts burning vegetation at the flow margin. Right: A closer look at the flow front, showing the leading edge moving through thick vegetation.

A comparison of a normal photograph of the flow front with a thermal image. The white box shows the extent of the thermal image. The thermal image shows that numerous active breakouts (white and yellow areas) are scattered behind the flow front.

A close view of the north margin of the flow, just behind the flow front.

This Quicktime movie provides a brief aerial overview of activity at the flow front.

October 15, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front advancement slows, but active breakouts persist near the front

The June 27th lava flow advancement has slowed, with the leading edge of the flow moving only a few tens of meters (yards) over the past two days. Nevertheless, active breakouts persist around the flow front, as shown in this photo by the continued burning of vegetation along the flow margins. This morning, the flow front was 1.1 km (0.7 miles) from Apaʻa St., as measured along a straight line.

Left: A wider view of the flow front from the north. The transfer station on Apaʻa St. is at the left edge of the photo, and Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen on the horizon in the upper right. Right: A closer view of the leading edge of the flow, which consisted of scattered breakouts along the flow margin that were slowly moving through thick vegetation.

A normal photograph along with a thermal image of the flow front. The white box shows the approximate extent of the thermal image. The thermal image clearly shows the distribution of active breakouts (white and yellow areas), which are scattered at the leading edge of the flow but are also present up to about 1.8 km (1.1 miles) behind the flow front.

Left: Although the advancement of the leading edge of the June 27th flow has been minor over the past two days, a view into a skylight on the lava tube today showed that lava in the tube was still swiftly moving downslope towards the flow front. Right: Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater remains filled with thick fume, and activity in the crater has not changed significantly over the past week. In the lower portion of the photograph, a line of fume sources marks the path of the June 27th lava tube. The broad circular feature in the left portion of the photograph is the perched lava pond that was active in July.

October 13, 2014 — Kīlauea


June 27th lava flow remains active, continues advancing northeast

The flow front remains active, with continued slow advancement towards the northeast over the weekend. The flow front today was 1.1 km (0.7 miles) upslope from Apaʻa St. and 2.2 km (1.4 miles) from Pāhoa Village Road, as measured along a straight line. This photo, looking down flow and taken at a low altitude, shows the flow front direction relative to the transfer station and Pāhoa.

Left: A wider view of the flow front, looking upslope. Kaohe Homesteads is in the left portion of the image, and Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen on the horizon. Right: A closer view of the flow front, burning vegetation at its flow margin.

A view of the flow front from a normal camera (left) as well as from a thermal camera (right). The white box shows the extent of the thermal image. The thermal image shows that breakouts are active at the leading tip of the flow, and are also scattered upslope from the flow front.

Left: Active breakouts are also scattered around the area that lava first entered ground cracks. The smoke plumes mark spots where individual breakouts are burning vegetation. Right: Activity in Puʻu ʻŌʻō today remains similar to what we have observed during recent weeks. Several pits on the crater floor had small incandescent holes, and there appeared to be a small lava pond in the southern pit.

This Quicktime movie provides a brief aerial overview of activity at the flow front.

October 10, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front remains narrow, continues to advance towards northeast

The June 27th lava flow remains active, and continues advancing towards the northeast. The flow front today was still narrow, about 185 m (roughly 600 feet) wide. The flow front today was 1.3 km (0.8 miles) upslope from Apaʻa St. and 2.4 km (1.5 miles) from Pāhoa Village Road.

Comparison of a normal photograph with a thermal image. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image. The thermal image shows active breakouts (white and yellow areas) focused at the flow front but also scattered behind the front.

A closer look at the narrow flow front. Kaohe Homesteads subdivision in the upper left portion of the image.

Left: A thermal image of the flow front, which consisted of several lobes moving through thick vegetation. Yellow and white areas are active breakouts on the surface, while the red and purple areas are cooling crust. Right: This Quicktime movie provides a brief aerial overview of the flow front, showing its proximity to the the transfer station on Apaʻa St., and ends by panning over to show Pāhoa.

October 8, 2014 — Kīlauea


Flow front remains narrow, and continues slowly advancing to northeast

The June 27th lava flow remains active, and continues to slowly advance towards the northeast along the forest boundary. The flow front remains narrow, about 100 m (yards) wide, and was 1.4 km (0.9 miles) from Apaʻa St. and 2.5 km (1.6 miles) from Pāhoa Village Road (as measured along a straight line).

Left: A wider view of the flow front, with Kaohe Homesteads at the left side of the photograph. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen on the horizon in the upper right. Right: A closer view of the flow front moving along the forest boundary. The flow front had nearly entered a clearing in the thick forest.

A normal photograph compared with a thermal image of the flow front. The white box shows the approximate extent of the thermal image. Breakouts (white and yellow areas in thermal image) were active at the leading edge of the flow, and were also scattered behind the flow front.

Left: A view into one of the skylights of the lava tube supplying lava to the June 27th lava flow. Right: A look into the southern portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater. A small lava pond (roughly 10 meters, or yards, wide) was active in the southern pit. The pond surface was fluctuating as spattering was active on the pond margin.

This Quicktime movie provides a quick aerial overview of activity at the flow front. At the end of the movie there is a view of the lava stream in one of the skylights on the lava tube supplying lava to the flow front.